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Jim/Steelsewing

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When I was chasing after early type 40 library tables the first one to arrive was a surprise. The table had a left-sided knee control. Not only that, but it was an electronic knee control and not the mechanical rods of the 101 cabinets. This table came with another question since it had a 1919 model 66 in Red Eye decals. Not that the machine is odd, but according to everything I've read, the type 40 DeLuxe Library Table was introduced to the public in July of 1920.

Hmmm indeed.

The underside of the cabinet also proved just as interesting.

IMG_4035.jpg 

Here's a pic showing the controller mechanism located in the back left corner of the table, and I have never seen one of those before. And the barely visible end of the support rod for the left leaf can be seen (top right). It is not spring driven, and there is no actuator on the leaf hinge.

IMG_4025.jpg 

Looking a little like a beached octopus, the cabinet sports the early wiring connectors that use the round metal sheathed Bakelite plugs. This photo makes it all look far more complicated than is. From what I've been able to gather from other machines, this system predates the 'usual' Singer 3-prong plug by about five years. I had fun with redoing the wiring on the 1921 model 101 with these plugs and thought this shouldn't be much different.

DSCN0003.jpg 

I was wrong. All of the plugs on the 101 were plugs, not pins. The ends of the power cord on the 66 have two pin assemblies. Once the metal barrel is removed, this is what lay inside.

DSCN0005.jpg 

After considerable cleaning... (read chipping away solder) you can see what was used for a connector in the early 20s. The piece of copper is surrounded by the Bakelite and the 'loop' in the back is the connection point for connecting the wire.

DSCN0008.jpg 

Reproducing the original wiring set-up wasn't at all fun. Apparently what Singer did was to take the bare wire end and stuff it into the copper loop of the pin connector. Then, using a healthy amount of flux, the loop and wire were heated and solder was allowed to 'flow' through the combination. This method 'filled' the spaces between wire and loop with solder. (lead solder at least 40/60).  Once all this cooled, the connection is very solid, but the space between the soldered connection and the metal barrel sleeve that covers it, is disconcerting.

DSCN0009.jpg 

I went ahead and reproduced the original method of connection, but before the metal barrel cover was spun onto the Bakelite, I covered the connection in two layers of electrical tape. Even with that, I'm still not fond of the method being used.

DSCN0010.jpg 

The receiving plugs for the motor circuit were far easier to tackle. These had an added feature of a screw tap in the center of the loop! This made for a far simpler and seemingly safer connection (lots more space between barrel cover and connection. Here you can see that the wrap of electrical tape was already there when I took the wiring apart - wonder if it had been installed at the factory? =)

I replaced the power cord, and the leads to the motor and left the original wire to the controller - since it appeared perfectly viable. The wiring diagram is really simple, but there isn't any option at all for a light assembly circuit. More than once during the process of replacing these connections, I actually missed having the 3-prong version.





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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #2 
Wow...you are a brave man to tackle that one.
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Christy

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My dad would've said "glad it was you and not me!"  Still, it's intersting and I'm glad you shared.  It would've made me nervous too and I'm not sure if I would've stayed with the original or  tried to think of another plan.  I'm not personally fond of electrical tape.  It never feels like it's going to stay put for long.  I might have tried a bit of shrink tape.  I like that much better!
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Jim/Steelsewing

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The only thing I could think of to make it any safer and still use the original power cord ends was to grind or cut down the width of the loop. If I took x amount off both sides and left a slimmer loop, then I could wrap the loop with wire, solder and shrink tube most it and then spin the barrel cover over that. It would be more like the plugs with the center screw. I may yet do just that. On the other hand, I do have all the parts I'd need to convert it all over to the 3-prong. It wouldn't take very long and I could add a Singerlight to the mix, but that would take away a piece of the evolution of early electrical systems, and I sort of like having the light-less cabinet. If I stumbled onto one of these, then there's bound to be others still out there. 
__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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