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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #1 
Rescue this from a flea market seller today.
Japanese made and two new for my collection.
 
But it will be fun to play with for a bit before I find it a new home.

20190317_144000-1024x768.jpg  20190317_143946-1024x768.jpg  20190317_143833-1024x768.jpg  20190317_143819-1024x768.jpg  20190317_143745-1024x768.jpg  20190317_143737-1024x768.jpg  20190317_143730-1024x768.jpg 


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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #2 
You have the best flea markets there, Steve.
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penny

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Reply with quote  #3 
It's a cute little thing but study.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #4 
Nice save. Don't see that kind and size of needle plate very often. I take it is a chain stitch and maybe a little smaller than a FW?

Is it three stitches per hand wheel revolution?

Janey

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SteveH-VSS

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20190317_192438-800x600.jpg 


This shows the very unique hand crank case interaction and if you look at the second photo below you will see the little metal plate they put there to make sure if your fingers got pinched you got really damaged
20190317_192454-600x800.jpg  20190317_192443-600x800.jpg 


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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #6 
Sweet little machine, Steve!  When you decide to 're-home' it, I would be interested....
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WI Lori
You have the best flea markets there, Steve.


I was thinking the same thing!

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #8 
Actually I think it is more about repetition.  Because of the Heartbeat issues, we had to limit our exercise to walking so we picked two local flea markets as our walking route...   When you scan them every week, you find surprise gems.
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Sondra

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Reply with quote  #9 
I'm interested to see how the stitching is compared to a W&G. That's the only chain stitch I have experience with, but have read some about some of the others stitch mechanisms.
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #10 
I am still at the clean stage.  But once it is no longer gunked up, I will test sew with it.
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #11 
That is awesomely cool!
I've never understood machines that have large beds with a short arm. You're lugging around "that size" anway, you might as well have a harp to go with it!

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #12 
Ok, Looking for a little help here.  This machine has the strangest thread path of any machine I have worked with

The little rusty disk on the top right appears to be like the automatic tension of a W&G in operation
On the right side in this picture you can see what I call the "take down" because it is like the Take-up arm in the front but is operates DOWN while the other goes up....
Then there is the thread guide at the top with a slotted hole like most, but then a second actual hole is next to it....
Even though it has the upper "automatic tension" bit, there is a standard tension as well.

Every way I have threaded it breaks thread in use.

The folks on FB do not seem to know either (yet)

20190321_205001-768x1024.jpg 


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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #13 
I don't know if this will help. It isn't quite the same, but maybe a similar path??    You will have to scroll through the pictures to see a machine threaded.
https://page.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/l368231172

Maybe 'take-down' first, up through the face plate around the top knob (automatic tensions?) , back through the face plate, tension disc, take up lever, needle.  

What kind of needle? round or flat shank?

Janey

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #14 
flat

I do not see any pics on that site and none of the things I clicked on showed any, sorry.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #15 
The forum's URL mechanism added a space to the end of the URL.  Copy and paste the text of the link yourself, instead of clicking on it.

paul

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #16 
I just fixed the link in the post as well.

I see it.  I'll try it.  Different model, but the concept should be the same

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorba
That is awesomely cool!
I've never understood machines that have large beds with a short arm. You're lugging around "that size" anway, you might as well have a harp to go with it!


Actually, back when I was sewing clothes, I wondered why there was so much room under the arm. I only used a relative small seam and thought there wasn't much room to the left of the needle to support the larger amount of fabric. I used a portable machine for a lot of years.

Janey

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #18 
Thank you, Paul, for figuring that out.

Thank you, Steve, for fixing the link.

I hope that works. It sure is a cute machine.

Janey


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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench


Actually, back when I was sewing clothes, I wondered why there was so much room under the arm. I only used a relative small seam and thought there wasn't much room to the left of the needle to support the larger amount of fabric. I used a portable machine for a lot of years.

Janey


I figured somebody would say that - and that *is* the only justification I can think of. With that said, you can always extend the sewing surface to the left of the needle "by hook or by crook" in any one of a number of ways. Its a bit harder to get more harp space! But I'm usually trying to stuff a 25 yard skirt or something else that's big and/or bulky under the arm.  Hemming and elastic cases aren't so bad, but if you're sewing in the middle of the darn thing, it can be painful!

But that's why I have my main machine in a table, its nice to be able to spread out in that direction. I remember my mother using books on occasion with her portable.

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