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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #1 
This just arrived safe and sound via FedEx. This is an early Canadian sewing machine on its original marble base. It does have a shuttle and what I can get it out I'll find out if it has a bobbin

20190806_171124-1024x768.jpg  20190806_171115-1024x768.jpg 


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SteveH-VSS

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Success!!!  It has a shuttle and bobbin!

Took some serious cleaning with SM Oil and 0000 Steel wool along with liberal oiling, but she moves smooth as glass (if a little heavy in the hand)

This is one of the only machines on the Needlebar list that is all blanks...  Research indicates that this should use a 16x1 needle.

The vertically oriented VS shuttle mechanism is soo cool.  I will try to get a video tonight.

Pics to follow soon.

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Stacy

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Reply with quote  #3 
Steve, So happy for you.

  When I hear "Wanzer", I still think of Jennifer Hill (RIP).

   She had 7 or so, of various models, including L'il Wanzer.  I remember her mentioning her model F,  from 1870s (?),  had reverse.

 Jennifer had used some popular photo hosting platform , but that collapsed, and I'm not sure if she got around to transferring pics of her collection elsewhere.

 (She was a helpful member of many sm groups, including Needlebar).

 
 Looking forward to seeing your video.

 

 
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
Success!!!  It has a shuttle and bobbin!... I will try to get a video tonight.

Pics to follow soon.


YIPPPIE !!!!! For both it having the shuttle & bobbin and looking forward to pictures and video.

Janey

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #5 
The bobbin and shuttle as found....  
20190806_191315_cropped.jpg


The Bobbin and Shuttle cleaned up.  NOTE: See the fingernail groove cut into it to make inserting and removing the shuttle easier
  20190806_193213.jpg 

The way it got clean...  You may see a bottle of Tri-Flo in some of these pictures, but it is filled with SM Oil because i like the size and feed tube
20190806_191108.jpg 

The face plate after a found of cleaning.  Trying to get a shot to see all of the text was fun...
20190806_204406.jpg 

How she looks now (no flash)
20190807_072207.jpg


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SteveH-VSS

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #7 
Amazing!  I've never heard nor seen this type of shuttle action.  You have an interesting and fun machine there - probably pretty rare too I'm guessing.
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Stacy

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Sew cool. Thanks Steve.
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SteveH-VSS

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #10 
Interesting shuttle action Steve. It looks very "efficient" in design and function. Thanks for sharing.
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seb58

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Reply with quote  #11 
Very interesting! I'm always amazed at the ingenuity!
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #12 
I love watching the constant rotating shaft motion get converted to reciprocating 1/4 arc motion.  I could watch a loop of that for quite a while.....
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #13 
See, there's the thing.  I've seen, and even designed, some very clever software mechanisms in my life, but basically no one will ever see them, or think, "Whoa, that Wanzer guy -- he was on a roll, that day!"

Mechanicals are cool.

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #14 
She Sews!!!!!

I ordered a batch of Organ 16x1 needles from Amazon and they were delivered very quickly. 
Unfortunately they were NOT 16x1 they were 15x1 which is the same size but flat shank. 
The 15x1 shank is also slightly thicker...

HOWEVER, in the paperwork they indicated that the 15x1 is Euro Sys 705 H and I recalled just working with my stack of original Victorian needles from Europe and a stack of packs were system 705 (The H seems to indicate flat shank, without it is round)  I opened a pack, cleaned a needle (100+ years of storage in paper) and it worked!  It was not picking up the bottom stitch however.  I checked the groove direction (always a possibility on round shank) but it was correct and decided to quit for the night as i was getting frustrated.

Then I remembered needle set marks......

Many older machines have a horizontal line scored into the needlebar.  When you set the needlebar so that the horizontal mark is at the exact top edge of the body, the needle should have the eye at the level of the stitch plate.  Easy adjustment and Viola! she sews!

20190813_205123.jpg 


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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #15 
There's nothing more satisfying than taking an old machine about 150 years old or older and getting it to sew. You are so lucky to find one that takes modern needles. I'd like to get a Wanzer, but they are rare in my experience. I only had a chance to bid on one and lost. Cool mechanism! 

- Bruce
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thanks, I agree!

I am conflicted about this one.....  I have a standing policy against "adding back" to old machines.  With that said however, I really want to use this one and having 30% of the bed japanning missing and gouges all over the work surface makes that more challenging.  I have been debating with myself about stripping the TOP work surface only and applying DE1635 (simulated Japanning) and then adding a label underneath to call out the work done.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #17 
Would simply stripping and polishing the bed surface suffice?  You could still attach a note, and/or a photo of the original damaged surface, but it wouldn't be "adding back".  And there would be less risk of the new paint clashing with the old japanning.

paul

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #18 
Maybe.  I had not considered that.  I will ponder that for a while.

But in regards to the clashing, I have painted 1/4 of a sewing machine bed as a repair for someone else and when I delivered it, they could not tell where the demarcation was.  DE1635 is amazing.  It is the Ceramic content that makes it flow like the japanning and the semi gloss is just right for japanning.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #19 
I guess I was thinking that if the rest of the japanning is even a little beat up like the bed is, then having a nice new coat of semi-gloss on the bed might be jarring.

In any case:  you have to go through the "stripped and polished" stage before you paint.  So if you decide to do anything at all, you can always stop half way.

paul

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