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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #1 
What type of container can be used for kerosene baths?
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Lori in Wisconsin
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #2 
If you are thinking of dunking a sewing machine in a tub of kerosene to soak and clean it, I would heartily advise against it. Old hand crank and treadle heads, maybe, but never an electric machine. Ever. 

- Bruce
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #3 
And a suitable container would be metal? Glass? Kryptonite?
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Lori in Wisconsin
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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #4 
Lori, a plastic 5 gallon pail, such as motor oil and hydraulic oil come in.  I have never totally submerged a sm.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #5 
If a scrub tub is all you want, and not a full submersion, then one of those squarish, plastic dish tubs that can be used in a sink (like the ones they sell at the Dollar Tree and Dollar Store) are useful. 

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #6 
If it's the fumes while it's soaking that concern you and it's getting too cold at night for a 'well-ventilated' indoor space... a pickle bucket and lid will work, or one of those "less than expensive" blue-speckled turkey roasting pans. I'd still be concerned with open flames and etc if you plan on turning your back on it. Most plastics will work... for awhile. Pickle buckets are sometimes available for free (or cheap) if you stop in and ask at your local restaurants. (Pickles, fryer oil, dry detergent, etc). Perhaps 'pickle bucket' is a local term here. read: 5 gallon plastic pail.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #7 
I am considering soaking just the bottom of the '24 frozen 101, as the lower gears appear frozen. The top gear may be frozen, as well, but I can continue to work on that.

That is if: the height of the kerosene covers the gears without impacting the wicks, and, I feel like pulling the lead lamp wire tube, which is doubtful.

But I've always wondered about the bathtub. I hadn't imagined putting the head vertically in a 5 gallon bucket, and didn't think a ruxxermaid style low tote would have integrity with the kerosene, or a dishpan. I do have a large roaster pan, however, or could pick up a thrift store pan inexpensively.

Bruce, why not ever an electric machine?

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Lori in Wisconsin
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #8 
A few years ago I soaked the bottom of my Singer 12 - just a few inches of kerosene in a rubbermaid like plastic tub - I did this outside and used a toothbrush after soaking to get in all the crevices on the rest of the areas.  There was so much crud and it was frozen and this solved the problem presto!  Probably I could have cleaned each section separately but I wanted to get all the kerosene work done and over with as soon as feasible.  

Since I love the 101s it's great to hear you are working on one of yours to get it running.  I am curious about the lead light tube.  When you say you will pull it does this mean replace?  To me, this seems like a really difficult task to rethread a protected wire through this area.  On my previous post on my 101 lead tube there is some additional information from wise others here that made comments on these wires.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #9 
Chaly, pull out, soak base, clean, then reinsert. That thread is exactly what I was thinking about. Just because it can be done doesn't mean it should be done.

I know, it took decades to get that way. I just...want.it.done.

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #10 
Lori, I would not soak an electric machine unless the wiring were totally removed. Old wiring is cloth wrap, not rubber or plastic. Even then, if there were a crack in the insulation, the kerosene could seep into the wiring. Applying electrical current to something soaked in kerosene is not a good idea unless you like fire. Even dried the cloth wrap would still be volatile. If it got into a switch, it may take a long time to dry out. 

Kerosene is not as effective as a solvent than Aero-Kroil or PB blaster, just cheaper. I have had totally frozen machines loosen up and run using Kroil in only minutes, one old Singer 27 took 3 days to loosen with Kroil and still required a large, square handled screwdriver shaft as a lever in the slot on the end of the top main shaft with the hand wheel removed to get it to turn. I kept working at it and lots of brown rust residue came out but at the end it spun like a top. 

Kerosene will work, but a good grade of penetrating oil (Kroil is my favorite) will work better. Also, kerosene stinks. Kroil has a pleasant smell, at least to me. One I like better even than Kroil is Hoppe's No. 9 gun bore cleaning solvent found in sporting goods stores and gun shops (if they haven't been outlawed in your town). Just be careful with Hoppe's on old top coats and decals. I have even used it to remove caked on grime on those, but sparingly and prepared to get it off quick if needed (I used Q-tips). 

As long as the moving parts stay wet with solvent, you don't need a tub full. You can put pieces of paper towel soaked in solvent on them, too. The only advantage of kerosene is that it evaporates at as slower rate than most penetrating oils. I have unstuck many a sewing machine or parts of sewing machines. Kerosene would be my last choice. 

- Bruce
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #11 
x2 on the KROIL  I use it ALL the time.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #12 
On my Singer 101, I followed Bruce's advice and used Kroil on some frozen screws and I really liked it - better than PB Blaster and does have a good smell.  If you can work in areas/sections and use the Kroil (it is expensive though) and avoid the kerosene this may be better.  I always also worry about the flammability of kerosene and using large amounts such as for soaking.

When I used the kerosene on my Singer 12, although it worked, now I think I would try other alternatives since I am better informed with this wise group of people here.
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #13 
Yep. Kroil Oil works, it just makes me sneeze. ([rolleyes]I know right.)
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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #14 
We have Hoppes, but the smell of banana oil....
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Lori in Wisconsin
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Deb

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Reply with quote  #15 
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Better-Homes-Gardens-Rectangular-Galvanized-Steel-Tub/805862433

I bought a couple of these for storing apples, potatoes, etc.  I think a machine would fit for cleaning... 22x15x10 inches. Ad says 'in stock' at Iron Mnt.



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Deb in WI
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thanks, Deb. That looks ideal, and no mistaking it for the blue speckle chicken roaster.
The 101 is not responding to the Hoppes. :/

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Lori in Wisconsin
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