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Mrs. D

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3 JSilberg MOP TS HC 723160 .jpg A lovely J. Silberg hand crank, manufactured by Hengstenberg.  This is one of the hand cranks I purchased earlier this week. 

I've been looking at it since January, and finally made a decision to buy it. 

I wrote to Skipper in January to ask his opinion about the cosmetic repairs it requires.  

  Badge ID J Silberberg of Hamburg.jpg 

J. Silberg badge, identifying the machine.  The machine's serial number is 723160.  Anyone know when it was manufactured. 

2 JSilber MOP TS HC 723160.jpg 
I knew the condition of the machine when I purchased it. 

Our VSF member and expert Skipper suggests I repair one shard at a time using Dap Weldwood contact cement, and follow the directions on the bottle. 

contact cement Dap Weldwood.jpg 

Dap Weldwood directions:  Shake well.  Apply to both surfaces.  Let dry 15 minutes, but not longer than 2 hours.  Carefully align surfaces as adhesive will bond permanently on contact.

The center triangle shard is completely loose, whereas the other shards are still attached.  Skipper suggests I glue down one shard at a time.

Skipper said the following:

"You have one shot at this.  Once the glue sets the lifted areas can not be moved again . . . once the glue is tacky press the lifted area down and smooth flat.  It will hold down without weights but the weights will insure a good contact and flat repair."  You can remove the weights in about 4 hours and continue."

"Once the repair is made you will have to deal with the cracks.  This is when the aniline dye and shellac mixed to make a thick paint to fill in and then polished to hide them."

***
Skipper answered my question how this "heaving" could happen. 

"The lifting of the japann is caused by extreme heat and cold such as the machine stored in an unheated shed or attic.  These machines like AC and about 30% humidity just like us humans.  If you are comfortable, then the machine is comfortable.  In the old days without AC the machines were kept in the home and used so were protected from extremes.  This is over simplified but you get the idea."

***

I asked and received permission from Skipper to share his answers to my questions.  Thank you again Skipper.  


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Mrs. D - Wisconsin
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Mickey

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Great tips. I have seen antique Japanned furniture being repaired. I they used a type of liquid glue in a syrringe, then pressed down and let it dry. You can probably find replacement pieces for the missing mother of pearl. I have seen inlays on violins and guitar being repaired, matiching bits can be found. I think some drill and polish out pieces from shell with simple tools like a dremel too.

I have been wondering if pin and scissor scratches on the bed can be polished out with shellac with out too much preparation and skill.
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johnstuart

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3M has a glue set like a syringe for veneer fixing. I have inquired to the American and Canadian conservation associations, and they both have not come up with a very good way of conserving that yet. Skipper's is the best i have heard so far. Points made from the societies was the cause of the lifting. Injecting material might seal the cause of the lift in place. Example given was saline air to salt flood getting into cracks in the surface and oxidizing material under that surface.

The inquiry was for a White Gem that Katie Farmer had identified as 1 of 9 known

I would really like to experiment on a wreck with similar flaking to try to bake it back on. The original method was baked on. There are modern jappaning finishes that don't need to be cooked, but can be cooked and original baked. I have seen this method on youtube videos for full items using a cobbled up domestic oven.

I think the 3m product was called a polymer injection, but not for sure.

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Skipper

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I use the Weldwood because it sticks down instantly. And easy to use without a long cure time with clamping for hours.
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susieQ

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These are interesting solutions.  But re-gluing pieces that are curled like these?  Wouldn't that just crack them into smaller (but glued down) pieces? You would still need to fill the cracks with something, right?  Just asking...
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Mrs. D

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Quote:
Originally Posted by susieQ
These are interesting solutions.  But re-gluing pieces that are curled like these?  Wouldn't that just crack them into smaller (but glued down) pieces? You would still need to fill the cracks with something, right?  Just asking...


Hi SusieQ.  Thanks for your questions.  

I examined the curled pieces, and am surprised to report they feel a bit flexible, like a long fingernail.  I am encouraged by the flex, and will re-glue the first shard and then post photos and commentary about the results.  

On the Victorian Sweatshop Forum, and the Quilting Board Forum, Skipper shared his recipe of black aniline powder dye and liquid shellac to make a thick paint to fill in the cracks.  Allowing the paint to dry for 48-72 hours, followed by French polishing, and then repeating the thick black paint process until the cracks are filled and the result is a restored finish.  I will use this technique on a couple of projects, including pin rash. 

I purchased a woodworkers' black aniline powder dye on Amazon - 1oz. $12.50.  From the hardware store - denatured alcohol, boiled linseed oil, shellac.  Found small black screw top glass containers to store black aniline dye/shellac paint, and plastic squeeze bottles to separate (verb) and store smaller amounts each of denatured alcohol, boiled linseed oil, liquid shellac--from Michaels Crafts Store. Maybe I should be making some kits?  
1a bed crack repair supplies.jpg  

I hope Skipper jumps in this conversation to answer questions.  He has the experience, where as I am a novice. 


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Mrs. D - Wisconsin
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Skipper

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Usually the loose japann is flexible enough to glue down. I have had good results with this and once the cracks or filled and french polish the repair is almost not visible. So don't be afraid to try it.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Another glue that you might use for this or something else is another DAP product called Rapid Fuse. It looks like super glue but works on just about anything, where super glue doesn't. No curing time, but you have about 30 seconds to position the pieces before it bonds. It lives up to its name lol. I've used it on metal, wood, and several plastics. My next attempt with it will be a gear if I can get it clean enough for the glue to hold.

Cari

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Skipper

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I can't find my before pictures but this Frister and Rossmann had the bed broken in half. Basically half of the bed was flapping in breeze and was non-functional. I cleaned the broken area with acetone and Used JB weld and clamps to glue the thing back together. When cured I filled in the crack with a thick paint made of black aniline dye(alcohol soluble) and shellac. I overfilled so I could bring it level with the bed using fine wet sandpaper. I had to apply several layers of paint to build it high enough. Once leveled I French polished the bed to match. The repair is almost invisible to the eye. It takes time but it works and can bring this machine back to a very functional sewing machine. Yes it sews a very fine stitch. I do not hesitate to use this machine. Please don't be afraid to try this type of repair on lifting japann or broken bed. I think Linda(MRS D) may still have a photo I sent her.DSCF2715.jpg  DSCF2713.jpg  DSCF2714.jpg 

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #10 
Nice work!
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Cari-in-Oly

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Ditto, very nice work!

Cari

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