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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #1 
Saw this today and thought it was interesting. Now we know the Japanese Pfaffs were built by Janome.
Use Google translate.

https://www.naehmaschinenverzeichnis.de/verzeichnis-der-naehmaschinen/dorina-pfaff-gritzner/geschichte/

Cari

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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #2 
Somebody emailed that to me today - interesting indeed. My Pfaff serger was "Built by Calanda".
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Olaf

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Reply with quote  #3 
Interesting, but some of the info in Zeit is not correct. They were probably influenced by the later use of the Calanda name for the sergers, as the one Zorba has, exactly as I was.
BTW: In some markets, those sergers were also sold as Gritzner!

Quote:
Der Lockvogel für diesen Zweck heißt Calanda; es ist eine einfache Geradstichnähmaschine zu einem unverbindlichen Richtpreis von 198 Mark. Calanda ist weit gereist. Sie kommt aus Übersee.


Translation by https://www.deepl.com/Translator:

Quote:
The lure for this purpose is called Calanda; it is a simple straight stitch sewing machine for a non-binding target price of 198 marks. Calanda has travelled far. She comes from overseas.


That is not correct at all. The description fits the Gritzner-made Calanda. It was labelled 'Pfaff mod 15 Calanda' as manual hand crank machine, and 'Pfaff mod 15 Gritzner' with an el. motor. They were cheap machines without any bells an whistles, based on the latest model R from Gritzner. Also see the production control card that was in my Calanda, it actually says model R. There was a big fire in 1955 that destroyed much of the Gritzner factory, so I don't have any production figures for the Calanda. Pfaff bought the Gritzner company in 1957, but Pfaff had interests in the company long before the final acquisition.
Logically speaking, Pfaff had no need for going overseas to find a simple straight stitch sewing machine, they already had plenty of those 'in house'.
Here is my Calanda:
https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/show_single_post?pid=1310990175&postcount=1816&forum=501752

There is also a a youtube movie about an electric Pfaff 15 Gritzner. The presenter makes the mistake of interpreting the serial number, as if it was a more than 100 year old Pfaff machine. In reality, it is a Gritzner serial number, placing the machine in the mid '50s. (the 'Made in Western Germany' label should have been a clue...)

Link to movie: watch?v=nV3oYpEn79k
Or make a search for 'pfaff 15' to get more examples.

Olaf

Edit: How do I post a youtube link without actually posting the video here? Hah, solved, used only the movie code!

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #4 
I was just coming to edit my original post but I'll make the correction here.

What I should have said was  - It's known that there are Japanese built (now should say Japanese looking) machines, sold in Canada, that are badged Calanda or Pfaff Calanda. I don't think their maker has ever been identified until now. This article says that Pfaff and Janome formed some sort of partnership in the 1960s.

Cari

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