Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #1 
IMG_7200.jpg

__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,401
Reply with quote  #2 
You went green before it was cool?


__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 901
Reply with quote  #3 
You are missing this one:
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/vintage-pfaff-gritzner-15-sewing-27185724

Or, you can't decide between a free arm or flat bed. [smile][smile]
0
Mrs. D

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 981
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi GuidCA [wave]

Nice looking machines.  Next time you talk about your "mean green machine", you'll have to be more specific which one you are referring to . . . 



__________________
Mrs. D - Wisconsin
http://www.1893victorianfarmhouse.blogspot.com
0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,228
Reply with quote  #5 
You have too many hammers?
__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,401
Reply with quote  #6 
Oh wait. I see the issue now.

I'll pm you with my mailing address and let you know when the Bernina gets here.
That should tidy everything up for you. No, really, it's okay. Happy to help. [biggrin]


(it's the only zigzag, like one of those 'circle the thing that doesn't belong' games)

__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
Farmer John

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 980
Reply with quote  #7 
An international quartet.  I see the problem, you need a "Made in USA" sm.  Also, one never has too many screwdrivers.
John
0
SteveH-VSS

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 5,178
Reply with quote  #8 
So the issue is either A) you need more shelf space, or B) you need more varieties in your hammer collection
__________________
Antioch, California
0
ChattyKathy

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 260
Reply with quote  #9 
Your collection of hammers and screw drivers far exceeds your vintage sewing machine collection.  

You have not been hit hard enough with the “vintage SM collection flu bug”!!! There is no vaccine for it!!! Only cure is to keep collecting.

But you have recovered from your “hammer and screw driver collection flu bug”.

LOL LOL LOL

__________________
Kathy
Near the WI/IL border
0
Christy

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,599
Reply with quote  #10 
You like green!  I see no problem with that!  I'd love to find a nice Husquvarna like that!

DSC_0747 (700 x 465).jpg  DSC_0770 (700 x 465).jpg  Singer 15-125 clean (700 x 465).jpg 


__________________
  • Christy
  • Ukiah, California


0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,401
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
So the issue is either A) you need more shelf space, or B) you need more varieties in your hammer collection


IMG_4572.jpg 

Maybe he doesn't work on as many German machines like I do...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmer John
An international quartet.  I see the problem, you need a "Made in USA" sm.


Since all the above machines are early to late 50's... it would be difficult to find an appropriate American made machine.
Sure, the Singer 301, or perhaps a 400 series, but they never came in green. So, yeah. there's an issue there. [biggrin]
About all your left with then would be a Kenmore Rotary in that weird crinkle green.


__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly
You are missing this one:
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/vintage-pfaff-gritzner-15-sewing-27185724

Or, you can't decide between a free arm or flat bed. [smile][smile]
Oh, I like that one! 

__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
You have too many hammers?
WAIT...is that a thing? 'cause if it is, I'm in trouble. I cropped the picture to keep out the mallets, and the specialty ball peins don't fit on the rack. 

__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmer John
An international quartet.  I see the problem, you need a "Made in USA" sm.  Also, one never has too many screwdrivers.
John
Good observation - but I'm ashamed to admit I FORGOT about my Singer 15-125, which was resting comfortably in his ugly (temporary) plastic case only 5 feet away from his green siblings.

__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
So the issue is either A) you need more shelf space, or B) you need more varieties in your hammer collection
Yet another astute observation, the answer to which is BOTH A and B.

__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christy
You like green!  I see no problem with that!  I'd love to find a nice Husquvarna like that!

DSC_0747 (700 x 465).jpg  DSC_0770 (700 x 465).jpg  Singer 15-125 clean (700 x 465).jpg 
Excellent machines, Christy! I'm smitten with that Adler, such superb mid-century Teutonic swoopiness.

__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
Farmer John

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 980
Reply with quote  #17 
Here is one that would fit right in.....it's green, it's 50s, and it is American...NOT,
it is actually a German Gritzner-Kayser.
100_1169.jpg 

0
hilltophomesteader

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,039
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim/Steelsewing


IMG_4572.jpg 

Maybe he doesn't work on as many German machines like I do...



Since all the above machines are early to late 50's... it would be difficult to find an appropriate American made machine.
Sure, the Singer 301, or perhaps a 400 series, but they never came in green. So, yeah. there's an issue there. [biggrin]
About all your left with then would be a Kenmore Rotary in that weird crinkle green.


Actually, Singer did make more green machines....There's also the 185 and the 15 models that came in green....and of course the 'celery' Featherweights, lol!

__________________
Hilltophomesteader, on the wet side of Washington!
http://www.hilltophomesteader.blogspot.com
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,957
Reply with quote  #19 
The Singer 285 was also green. Pam, the only green 15 is the 15-125.

Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #20 
I can't stop.

Here's a Singer 185J I re-homed a while back:

Singer 185J 4:16.jpg 

And a fantastic Husqvarna 19E I re-homed last month:

Husqvarna 19E 11:19.jpg

And one I should NEVER have let go, a Borletti New Home from 1957:

Borletti sold to Amy Wunsch PDX.jpg
I'm 95% certain that this as the machine designed by Niels Diffrient in conjunction with Marco Zanuso in Milan while Diffrient was on a Fulbright fellowship in 1957. I believe that Zanuso also designed typewriters for Olivetti during their golden age. Diffrient isn't a household name, but he was one of the early proponents of ergonomics, which he called "human scale" and he was a huge figure in American industrial design. 


__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #21 
A quick read worth the time for industrial design fans - 

https://monocle.com/magazine/issues/62/keeping-it-simple/


__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
ke6cvh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 597
Reply with quote  #22 
Hi Brian,

   Cool article link.

   When talking about industrial design the old adage "form follows function" usually comes up and originally was meant for architecture.  An interesting "exception" to that rule is smart phones.  Smart phones have evolved to the point where many times it is no longer the case and a documented exception to that adage.  I would like to add to that and say with industrial sewing machines it is still applicable.  With Walmart plastic sewing machines they took the adage and threw it out the door because if form follows function then a husband could gift one to his wife and expect it to work for some time not break soon after the acquisition of said machine.  I would think it certainly would apply to a vintage all metal machine.  Even before I knew the slightest thing about sewing machines after newly married I figured out to steer away from the plastic machine and around 2000 got on the internet then found a few ladies chatting about how the repairman would not believe that she wore out her 401a.  So our first purchase was a 401a with all sorts of attachments likely from an estate.

  In other words form follows function does not apply to the throw away society started by the humble razor blade.....or does it?  So I guess if the function was to sell a machine that would possibly last for a few rounds then end up in the land fill a Walmart special all plastic machine would fit that bill nicely.

  Certainly it still applies to industrial tools for sure.

Best regards,
Mike
0
ke6cvh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 597
Reply with quote  #23 
Hello group,

  Since folks are talking about famous designers here is a very accomplished designer , Charles Chuck,  that was the first African American to be an executive at Sears.  I bet he had his hands on the design of some of those green Kenmore machines 😉  What a wonderful success story for this amazing American.

Best regards,
Mike
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_%22Chuck%22_Harrison
0
GuidCA

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
Hello group,

  Since folks are talking about famous designers here is a very accomplished designer , Charles Chuck,  that was the first African American to be an executive at Sears.  I bet he had his hands on the design of some of those green Kenmore machines 😉  What a wonderful success story for this amazing American.

Best regards,
Mike
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_%22Chuck%22_Harrison
YES! Charles Harrison was unbelievably prolific. I've had a reminder in my phone for a couple of years to get our library to order this, though it's out of print I believe. Last time I checked I think copies on Amazon were selling for over $200...and for that cost, of course, I could buy 5 or 10 vintage sewing machines.[biggrin]

__________________
Brian
Oakland, CA
0
Zorba

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,047
Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
...An interesting "exception" to that rule is smart phones.  Smart phones have evolved to the point where many times it is no longer the case and a documented exception to that adage..

I knew there was a reason I detest smartphones! Never thought of it this way, but you're right. And the whole world is following, just look at the crap electronics and touchscreens we have to deal with in new cars!

__________________
-Zorba
"The Veiled Male"
http://www.doubleveil.net
0
ke6cvh

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 597
Reply with quote  #26 
I have sweaty hands by inheritance.  My hands are also large with big palms.  People will say in this country "I looked at your hands and can tell you work" or  make a comment about my big hands.  Recently, I was trying to use my smart phone's app calculator and was in a non air conditioned area.  From my days of having to use scientific calculators so much I literally wore out the button for the natural logarithm ( a different life ago for certain ) the person next to me made a comment "why are you pushing so hard" as I tried to get at least two numbers in a row to work.  And same applies to the mousepad on my macbook air.  Sometimes I have to keep something by me to wipe it off as it starts doing things on it's own as I type.  I finally figured out to softly press then hold down longer (much longer than any debounce circuitry for anyone into electronics) and I have a much higher success rate.  

  In regards to sewing machines with touch screens and also looms.  I was offered several pattern sewing machines recently that are used.  Someone else who did a QA for me correctly identified that the touch screen needs to still be soft as well as wiring in tact.  No wonder why they were offering two machines and one touch screen which I immediately made note of.  We visited a nearby remaining mill.  There was a graveyard of Japanese looms all of which had the same problem.  Non supported touch screens that were being parted out to support the others.  The mill owners were going to have to make a hard decision to get a tech from Japan to "upgrade" them and pay for a very expensive maintenance contract eliminating the ability for the mill to maintain their own equipment.  Sounds like computers in cars and bodies that have to be lifted off the frame for maintenance?

Best regards,
Mike
0
Son of A Singer Man

Member
Registered:
Posts: 73
Reply with quote  #27 
How about this "LEWENSTEIN"? It was made in Holland.LEWENSTEIN Sewing Machine.jpg 

__________________
"Son of A Singer Man" [smile]
0
ellellbee

Member
Registered:
Posts: 36
Reply with quote  #28 
I think I see the problem. Missing the more intense greens. The Lewiston above and the darker green Necchi BU.

Attached Images
png Screen Shot 2019-12-12 at 8.25.50 AM.png (1.33 MB, 14 views)

0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,957
Reply with quote  #29 
Also missing a good Japanese specimen.
S5030318.jpg 

Cari


__________________
Olympia Washington
0
Zorba

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,047
Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
I finally figured out to softly press then hold down longer (much longer than any debounce circuitry for anyone into electronics) and I have a much higher success rate.  

Most likely latency in the embedded software - a complete pet peeve of mine. I made my career in electronics and computers, but the older I get, the more I detest "technology" in just about everything. These old machines we collect will still be operating 100 years from now if someone bothers to spray some oil in their general direction every once in a while. The wonderful computerized stuff is obsolete in 5 years, broken in 10, and unrepairable in 15. That applies to sewing machines, computerized lathes and mills, as well as automobiles - a particular dislike of mine.

I was trained how to write and debug software, including firmware/embedded, and made my living at it for over a decade. "This ain't it" - these code grinders obviously didn't pass CS-101, some of them certainly didn't even take it!

__________________
-Zorba
"The Veiled Male"
http://www.doubleveil.net
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.