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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #51 
Wow, I've never seen a bobbin that flat before. Looks like someone stepped on it.

Cari

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #52 
That is the typical W&W Curved Needle bobbin.  I have a bunch of them
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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #53 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
That is the typical W&W Curved Needle bobbin.  I have a bunch of them


I have exactly ONE bobbin and ONE curved needle for my machine, lol.   How were you supposed to know if there was thread in it OR how to find the end if there was?


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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #54 
The early design of this early rotary machine speaks to what technology existed prior to it. We sink of bout having drawers full of bobbins of several varieties loaded with different colored threads and boxes of thread. When this machine was made a spool of thread cost a week's wages. My personal opinion is that the owner probably have three bobbins and knew intimately what was on each one. I hold it up to the light, and or put my lips on it and inhale to find the end of a thread. Have I read what is the appropriate thing to do yet... nope.
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Dmcshaw

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Reply with quote  #55 
Hello, all. I found this post quite interesting, as I have a Wheeler & Wilson #3 sewing machine with the serial number 811016, which means it was made in approximately 1857. It’s intact and all parts seem to work well. It appears to have its original belt, although it is dry rotted. The wooden case is in good condition, with the exception of a couple small pieces of missing veneer and a stain on the top, & the two top small drawers inside are missing. There is quite a bit of rust and most of the decorative gold embelllishments are gone. I wanted advice on the do's and dont's of cleaning and restoring that won’t devalue the piece, as I am considering selling it. I’ve attached some pics. Thank you for your help.

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #56 
Actually that serial number dates it to 1872
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Dmcshaw

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Reply with quote  #57 
Yes, I believe that is correct. 1872. Thank you.
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #58 

Woo HOO!!  The feed dog mechanism is at the welders. The shop was recommended by a trusted friend and I have to say, wow. The guy I spoke with has owned it for 40 years and he inherited it from his dad.

Tiny little dirty old shop. The guy grew up welding Steinway piano frames and rebuilding the metal portions of early aircraft. The City of San Leandro takes their early cast iron streetlight work to him. I think I found the right guy for the job.

He will do the heating, welding and cooling cycle tomorrow.

Hope Hope Hope


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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #59 
The feed dog arm is repaired!!!!  Here is the specifics of what happened.  There was a pad of stainless steel SOFT soldered to the bottom of the mechanism(most likely add later to account for wear from the cam).  When they ground it they created a square corner and they did not extend the underside support correctly so they literally created a fracture line waiting to happen.  He removed the pad, welded the arm, and HARD soldered the pad back into place.  I am picking it up after 12 today.   $250 total for the service.
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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #60 
Good to hear !!! Some good news for you eh!! That hard weld is heating both parts up red hot and soldering it together isn't it? I have heard from a guy that fixes cast stoves this way that is very hard to do. With a small part like that, i can only imagine the set up had be be spot on and work perfect and super fast. I would never be able to do this in my life but would love to be able to though. If i ever did a weld that technical, it would be a long shot good luck one lol.

  John Stuart
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #61 
20190514_132910.jpg

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #62 
Nice repair work!
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #63 
Top view of the assembly.  No hiding this repair! hehe
20190514_132903.jpg 


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