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GuidCA

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,
I’m trying to glue on a vinyl upholstery fabric (which has a sort of cloth-like inner lining) to the stripped wood of the base of a carrying case from a 1950-ish Anker sewing machine.

Any suggestions as to what glue to use? The wood is in pretty rough shape, and I don’t know whether to use Mod-Podge (which I can swipe from my wife), a toxic spray adhesive like DuPont 77, or something else. Would love to hear your recommendations.

Thanks,
Brian

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Brian
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #2 
My question would be do you ever plan to change it?  If so a water based glue is good, if not Super 77 would be good.
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #3 
I use my standby favorite: Hot hide glue. Holds Tolex and similar coverings just fine, and can be removed in the future if desired.
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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #4 
My first thought was contact cement.  Use in a VERY well ventilated area. There are water based versions available too but I haven't tried them.
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GuidCA

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks to all for your advice. I decided to use our can of ancient Super77 (seriously, it's like 20 years old), mainly because I didn't want to buy anything and partially to get rid of it. 

The Super77 REALLY stinks...I may have taken a month or two off my life. And despite my best efforts to ventilate, using it stunk up the house, which led my wife to grab the kids and take them out to pizza, so I should probably include that dinner tab with the cost of the machine...

Anyway, when I got the machine the base was soaking wet, having apparently been stored in a puddle (not a Best Practice.) I ripped off the old vinyl covering, which smelled awful at that point. So related to Zorba's suggestion - I'm guessing that this was originally constructed with hide glue!

Under the noxious vinyl was a pretty beat (and disappointingly constructed) wooden base. Though to be fair, it's probably closing in on 70 years old.
IMG_5970 copy.jpg
IMG_5972 copy.jpgHere's the finished base. I chose the fabric partially because of the color tone, but mostly because it was the thinnest vinyl I could find. 
IMG_6993 copy.jpg 
IMG_7005 copy.jpg 
Here's the clash between old and new...
IMG_7012 copy.jpg 
A few observations:
1. Using the Super 77 was a chore. It got all my tools sticky and my hands were a mess, my lungs are shot and I made a mess of the kitchen table (can't really blame that on 3M...)
2. Especially after it was wet from the adhesive, the vinyl was very hard to cut accurately with a X-Acto knife, even with a brand new blade. I gave up and switched to a new scalpel (inherited from my scientist dad) and it cut through the vinyl effortlessly.

Brian


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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
Yeah, those cases are all basically junk.  Every one that I've gotten has been falling apart in one way or another.  The vinyl was clearly a structural element.  ;-)

I nodded my head in agreement when someone suggested the 77, but I wish I'd warned you about the fumes.  It's definitely an outdoor glue -- weather permitting of course.

Anyway, nice job!  I suspect the Anker designers and marketeers would be just a tad surprised by the leopard print.  ;-)

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #7 
Great job!  Sorry about the lack of warning, you mentioned the stuff so I assumed you were up to speed on it's "lesser" qualities.  Sorry again.

I had a small argument with a person at an event about "there is no way a major company would make those crappy bases, it has to be a replacement"  No, not it was not.  

Even in the early days, if you take the veneer off, you will see that they used hardwood around the edges and "fill wood" in the center under the veneer.  Cost cutting has ALWAYS been a part of commerce.



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pgf

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS

I had a small argument with a person at an event about "there is no way a major company would make those crappy bases, it has to be a replacement"  No, not it was not.  



Interesting -- I think the cases like that that I've gotten, held machines that had clearly been electrified long after production, either because of production date, or because the wiring was so amateurish it couldn't have been "factory".  So I've assumed that all cases like that were aftermarket.  Thanks for the correction.

paul

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #9 
Nice job recovering the base.
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuidCA
...So related to Zorba's suggestion - I'm guessing that this was originally constructed with hide glue!

Possibly, but probably not. It was probably a vegetable glue, they don't smell good when reconstituted. Hide glue generally has a kind of nice smell - although if it gets wet enough, long enough, it can start to rot/stink.

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Nelliesews

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Reply with quote  #11 
It might be better to play with a contact cement. If there is an automotive trim shop near you ask what they use. Try some on scrap wood and see what works best.
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