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Son of A Singer Man

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi,
      I thought that I would start this thread by asking; How old is your oldest sewing machine? and... what's the story of its acquisition? To my knowledge, the oldest sewing machine in my collection is my 1881 Singer "Medium" Model 13 treadle machine. It bears the numbers: 4677192 & 521192 on the machine bed in front of the pillar. I have been told that the larger number is the actual serial number of the machine.

      I acquired this machine at "Primrose Lane Antiques" in Mound House, Nevada, on July 9, 2005. When I first saw the machine in the shop, it somewhat reminded me of of my June Mfg. Co. "Improved Singer", which is a very close copy of the Singer Model 12. But the size of the Model 13 made me wonder just what it was. Fortunately, I had a copy of Charles' Law's "The Handbook of Antique Sewing Machines" out in the car, and that told me exactly what the machine is. 

     There was no owner's manual or attachments with the machine, and the asking price was $200.00 plus tax which brought the total price of the machine to $213.00. The woman running the store would not budge on the asking price, so I "bit the bullet" and paid the price [eek]. In the three years that I had been collecting antique and vintage sewing machines, I had never neither heard of much less seen a Singer Model 13 anywhere.

    Mound House, Nevada sits on a hilltop just east of Carson City on Hwy 50, and west of the turn off to Virginia City, NV. I have no idea if this machine was local to the area, but if it was, I sure wish that it could talk. Actually, I wish that all of my old machinery could talk!

   One thing that my Model 13 was missing was one of its slide plates.  Graham Forsdyke from "across the pond" had one available, so that took care of that issue.

Photos from 2005:

PH:  SINGER MEDIUM Model 13 #1.JPG  SINGER MEDIUM Model 13 #2.JPG  SINGER MEDIUM Model 13 #3.JPG  SINGER MEDIUM Model 13 #4.JPG  SINGER MEDIUM Model 13 #5.JPG 


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David

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Reply with quote  #2 
Mine is the 1879 NF I've been blathering on about for the past few days.  Prior to that it was an 1884 IF.

NF
[New%2BFamily%2B-%2B08] 

IF
[IF%2Btreadle%2Bgood%2B1] 

Cheers,


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David
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Old Singers and the Like
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charley26

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Reply with quote  #3 
My oldest machine is a Singer 28 from 1889. it has some lovely flower decals, some have perished though. SteveH-VSS has a similar one. Mine was an eBay find £20, and I think it is beautiful.



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jpeg IMG_0006.jpg (107.96 KB, 14 views)


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Marie
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #4 
Mine is a 128 LaVencendora decal Singer, from 1919. I bought it from an ice cream shoppe here in town in the mid 90s for the grand sum of $25. (I was told it was "Singer's first electric"). I am sure it was somebody's first electric Singer! Cathy/Macybaby helped me with missing attachments.
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davevv

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Our (my wife claims him and uses him for all her paper piecing) oldest would be "Stanley".  So named because the top of the arm wears a decal that says "Stanley Manufacturing Co.".  Stanley is a Singer model 28 hand crank that was born in 1894.  He isn't the prettiest machine in the herd, but he's seen so much use in his life that he is by far the smoothest.  I found him on Craigslist.

[DSCN0154-XL]

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macybaby

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hmm- well I guess technically it's still mine.

1868 I believe.   I have the belt guard,  it was just removed for transport



This may be my second oldest,  but I'm not sure on that.  It's the one I got to replace the one about,  but that one has not made it to a new home yet.


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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #7 
We believe that this Shaw & Clark machine was made in 1863 

It is a walking foot chain stitch machine
The patent for this machine was issued in 1862

20150304_195318.jpg 

Picture12.jpg 

20150305_230409.jpg 


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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #8 
I have a Charles Raymond dated ca1860. Chain stitch with walking foot like Steve's. DSCF1122.JPG  DSCF1123.JPG  DSCF1126.JPG 

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Skipper
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J Miller

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Reply with quote  #9 
My oldest is an 1887 vintage NEW HOME New Model (Pre Mdl A) in a coffin top treadle.
IMG_6374.JPG
IMG_6375.JPG
IMG_6399.JPG     

Got it from a church friend of my SIL.   Machine sews just fine although the cabinet is missing the pivot out center drawer, drip tray and a few pieces of the side drawer frames.


Joe


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Visit our Etsy store for pet related goodies and other items too.
https://www.etsy.com/shop/TBearsAndOtherWares?ele=shop_open

I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
JM in FT Wayne, IN

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HelenAnn

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Reply with quote  #10 
Oh this is great, I have to take photos and get dates.
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Arnold

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Reply with quote  #11 
  I don't have a sewing machine from the 1800's so I guess mine are all very newish ?

       Arnold
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #12 
My oldest machine is a 1917 New Home. S5032209.JPG 
S5032232.JPG 

Cari


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purplefiend

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Reply with quote  #13 
My oldest machine is a 1907 Singer 27, it still needs a spa treatment. My oldest working machine is a 1914 Singer 115.

http://tinyurl.com/hssl7gw

Sharon in Texas
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TwassG

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Reply with quote  #14 
My oldest machine is a very early Adler Class 8 from around 1880. It's still missing a fitting base, or treadle. I would love to turn it into a handcrank, but it's missing a motor boss, so that would be tricky. But well, apart from that it's up to working order again.
Should have taken some new pictures before storing it up.






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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #15 
Twass - boy, that sure looks "W&W" derived.  A lot like the Phoenix as well
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SewMachines

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Reply with quote  #16 
My oldest is this lovely Wheeler & Wilson (model 1?) curved needle machine from 1859.
Found her on half-price day at a thrift shop at the beach in winter after someone told me she was there and they weren't going to rescue her [wink]
Still trying to get her to sew, but sadly she is my 'toothless wonder' and I don't think has enough teeth to get the fabric moving. I haven't given up yet, though.

IMG_9997.JPG 

IMG_0008.JPG 


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TwassG

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Reply with quote  #17 


SewMachines, your machine looks awesome. *green*




Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
Twass - boy, that sure looks "W&W" derived.  A lot like the Phoenix as well


That machine is sooo smooth. I love it! Can't wait to find a way to rig it up.
BtW, just saw a Baer & Rempel made W &G chain stitcher at a private display. Sooooooo nice, never knew that B&R made those. Never saw a refernce to them. New machine on my shorter list. ;-)

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Son of A Singer Man

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hi Sewmachines,   I Love the look of your 1859 Wheeler & Wilson machine! I suspect that with enough effort, that you will eventually get it to make stitches.
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"Son of A Singer Man" [smile]
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Farmhousesewer

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Reply with quote  #19 
My oldest is an 1882 Singer 12 purchased at the 2009 ISMACS convention in Charlotte NC. Paid $475. Auctions do that to you, but I don't regret it.
HPIM6903-web.jpg  HPIM6906-web.jpg  HPIM6907-web.jpg 
It is a treadle with a foldy top box. The only thing missing is the draw and I do not have attachments. 


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Maria
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davevv

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Reply with quote  #20 
That is a beautiful machine!
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #21 
Worth every penny! It's beautiful.
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Margaret 
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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #22 
That is a nice looking machine Maria. You did good.
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SewMachines

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Reply with quote  #23 
Maria,

That one is stunning! That mop always makes me swoon!

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #24 
I have it's twin!
20141012_210816.jpg 


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David

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Reply with quote  #25 
Question.  Did they actually work the metal to get the MOP to inlay or is it on the surface?
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David
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treadlecrazy

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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David
Question.  Did they actually work the metal to get the MOP to inlay or is it on the surface?


This article describes the process:
http://ismacs.net/sewing_machine_articles/japanning.html

The MOP is put into the first layer of japan when it is soft. After the final layer of japan is put on, the surface is ground down to reveal the MOP.

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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #27 
Those must have cost a fortune even way back when! Any idea of original sales price? And were they used or just for decoration?
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Margaret 
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Farmhousesewer

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Reply with quote  #28 
Thanks all.
WOW Steve, I think yours is the princess while mine is the pauper! Yours still has all the gold decals around the MOP and your handwheel is unbelievable.  Mine was definitely used.

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Maria
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #29 
Thanks Maria, I really hoped it did not come across as "oh yeah? look at mine!"  
I like the polished handwheel on your better, I actually snagged a bit of the MOP on my handwheel while using it one time.

Does yours have the "engraved" slide plates?
DSC_0365.JPG 

David - The word is that it was 20 hours of hand sanding to do the MOP.  I have one in process, that I am making intio a MOP and it is a LOT of work, and just ONE screw up and you have to start all over again....

Margaret - Mine was purchased used in 1920's by Elma Peters to use up at the family cabin in the East Hayward hills.  When she passed a couple years ago her son sold it to me.  To protect the treadle and cabinet it was painted with HOUSE PAINT.  this is what I bought...
20141011_113501.jpg 

and in process
20141011_153014.jpg 



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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #30 
Screaming on the inside!
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Margaret 
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaret
Screaming on the inside!


Funny, I was the same until Heather pointed out it was a very pragmatic way to protect the wood and cast iron.  It was in phenomenal shape under the thick old paint.  (but my middle daughter referred to it as "I hate my life grey")

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Farmhousesewer

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Reply with quote  #32 
Steve
Of course you did not come off that way. I know better by how you treat everyone.

My slideplates are smooth, just like the handwheel. To be honest, I have done absolutely nothing to this machine.Don't have the nerve! It was put up for bid by Chuck O. My understanding is that I did not pay too much. It was actually close to what he paid for it. Also Harry was sitting behind me at the auction and gave me a nod and a smile when I looked at him. I was actually terrified at what I had bid!

Maybe some of us will remember Chuck O . He had a huge collection and I believe actually had a warehouse. He has since sold off his collection, mostly to those on TreadleOn. I have one other machine, obtained during his sell off. He was too far from here for me to pick it up.

Then I learned he was coming to the 2011 convention and I purchased one machine and 2 double Boye cases from him. A person, who will remain anonymous, was not a happy camper and  outbid me for an Atlas B had crank I really wanted. Another person, an executive from Singer ( if you will) outbid me for a Jones handcrank. He paid for it, but little did I know why... His last name was Jones!

BY the way, my treadle is offset. Is it the angle of the picture or is yours centered?

Oh, my (full ) serial number is 5019918  889918.

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Maria
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #33 
I will start a new thread for "Singer New Family, Model 12, 12K, and their clones" so as to not clutter up the "how-old-is-your-oldest-sewing-machine" thread any more...
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Phyllis1115

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Reply with quote  #34 
I've been away from my sewing machines for a while. But am back to cleaning and restoring them.

My oldest sewing machine is a rare version of an 1860s Folsom. Originally, I thought this machine was a Shaw & Clark, but according to Carter Bays, it's a Folsom. This fully complete machine was purchased from descendants of the original owner who lived in western Illinois and then the family moved to Iowa City, IA area. The siblings were tired of caring for other people's possessions and were happy the machine went to me. Unfortunately, most of the gold is missing. It's a chain stitch, walking foot machine. The screws that hold the plate that the foot rides on are frozen and I cannot remove it. I see some letters and/or numbers on this plate, but cannot read them.

I also have what I though was an incomplete New England type that looks like Steve and Skipper's machines. Someone painted it with red implement paint, but the rose is still visible on the bed.

-Phyllis in Iowa


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-Phyllis in Iowa
"Is this Heaven?"  "No, it's Iowa."   (Field of Dreams)
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