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pgf

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've been playing with one of my hemmer &G attachments -- I think it's the narrowest, but in any case it looks like the topmost hemmer in this photo.  I can use it, and it makes a nice hem.  I'd like to use it to make a basic bandana.  (Let's start simple, eh?  :-)

What I can't picture is, how do I handle a corner?  I can't imagine feeding the corner through the hemmer and having it work, nor can I picture getting the extra bulk of the previously done edge through the hemmer when doing the second or third edge.  There must be a trick...

paul

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Jpwest

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Reply with quote  #2 
It makes a beautiful hem but...the only way to corner that I can figure is to complete the edge, take out the material, turn, start the next edge. If anyone has a better suggestion..?
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Reply with quote  #3 
I don't have a W&G but I have worked some with Singer narrow hemmers. When I did a couple of bandana prints for my brother, I only had to do three sides as the other edge was a selvedge and he said I didn't have to hem that edge. There were two fabrics and one seemed to have more 'body' to it. The stiffer one did better in the narrow hemmer. So that would lead me to believe that something like Terial Magic or heavy starch would help handkerchief material. I think I've read about curving/trimming the edges toward the corners. The narrow hemmers have a tendency to flair out at the end of a hem.

I can't remember exactly, but it seems like I may have pressed the beginning inch then placed under the needle and took a couple of stitches then kind of worked it into the hemmer. The thread ends gave me something to hold on to help feed the material into the hemmer. I think that if one took a unknotted threaded hand needle and took one stitch into the corner and hold the end of the thread and the needle, it will help guide the fabric into the hemmer. After stitching a inch or two, you can remove the hand needle and thread.

I don't know if any of these links will work with the W&G narrow hemmer, but they may help someone else using a narrow hemmer.
https://www.threadsmagazine.com/2008/11/20/mastering-the-narrow-hemmer-part-one
https://www.threadsmagazine.com/2008/11/13/mastering-the-narrow-hemmer-part-two
https://www.threadsmagazine.com/2008/11/13/mastering-the-narrow-hemmer-part-three

Then there is the Singer "Shortcuts to Home Sewing" and the hemmer pages can be found at
https://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollections/Trade-Literature/Sewing-Machines/NMAHTEX/0141/imagepages/image37.htm and https://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollections/Trade-Literature/Sewing-Machines/NMAHTEX/0141/imagepages/image38.htm

I remember apron strings were narrow hemmed and saw a vintage apron at the thrift store the other day and looked at the corners. They were okay, but a little bit of thread and fabric didn't seem to be caught in the stitching. Some of the handkerchiefs I have it looks like they just sewed off the edges of the corners. One seemed to be very slightly rounded, but I can't quite tell how to stitch it with a narrow hemmer.

I think I did two opposing sides on my brother's bandana prints, then the last edge that already had the beginning and ending hems already hemmed. I didn't go around the three sides.

Good luck.

Janey

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks Janey!   Part 3 of the "mastering" series does talk about corners -- but sadly without nearly enough detail for me:   "Hemming corners is three-step process: Trim 1/4 in. off the corner, stitch to the end, then start over in a new direction."  That's it.  :-)   I guess I'll need to experiment.

Also, she's using a Singer-style hemmer foot, where (apparently -- haven't tried) it's possible to feed the fabric into the foot after starting the stitches.  I don't think that will work with the W&G foot.  We'll see.  As it happens, I went to an estate sale today and happened on a box of Singer side-mount attachments, which included a hemmer.  So maybe I can use one of my other machines instead of the W&G.

paul

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Reply with quote  #5 
Sorry, I can't be more help with the W&G hemmer. What number is on the Singer hemmer? I have a couple of attachment lists, and there were two narrow hemmers listed in "Machine Sewing" - one is 120842 and 120855. Of course, there are some others. Mostly I used 35996 on a 15-90 to sew my brother's. The best corner, which I did not trim the corner can be found at https://d28lcup14p4e72.cloudfront.net/197085/3916453/bestcorner.jpg I also used one of the others but don't remember which one. What I found was while the hem was the same size, the stitching was more in the center of the hem rather than on the edge.

Both the 120842 and 120855 are for low shank machines. The machines that have the flat on the needle on the right use 120842, the 120855 is for machines that the needle flat is on the left.

I also found http://runningstitches-mkb.blogspot.com/2012/06/rolled-hem-feet-they-are-not-created.html that says that even feet with the same number will give different results.

Janey

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
The one I just got is 35996, which I guess is like this one:  https://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk/simanco/35996/

Comparing it to the ones on the Running Stitches blog, it happens that the width of mine matches the on-screen width of those three exactly, but it's longer than any of them.  Don't know what that means in practice.

I'm pretty sure it came with a 66 -- but I was identifying the machine by reaching up into the bottom of the folded treadle cabinet to feel where the tensioner was (not a 15) and the height of the faceplate (maybe a 66).  So I could be wrong.  :-)

paul

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Reply with quote  #7 
Yes, probably a 66 as I found it in the 66-4_5 parts and lists it as a 5/64" hem.

Janey

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Reply with quote  #8 
I tried that Singer hem roller on my 99, and it seems like it's not aligned right.  It rolls/folds the hem nicely, but the stitches just miss the important crease.  But perhaps that's a project for another day, because...

... I went back to the W&G to try again, and discovered that I was overthinking it.  It turns out that the "leaves" of the flat springy metal that twist and form the hem are perfectly happy to let a previous formed hem at the leading or trailing edge of the fabric pass through with no problem.  It helps to have a pair of tweezers to help pull the leading edge of the cloth from the hemmer forward to the needle hole.  I have a pair with tiny jaws on the end, which are perfect -- don't know where I got them.

Clearly I have some practicing to do before taking on a real project, but it now looks possible.  Thanks for your encouragement and all the references -- they definitely helped!

paul

IMG_20190407_124056541_HDR.jpg IMG_20190407_124106240_HDR.jpg


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Reply with quote  #9 
On YouTube, FiddleyBits has excellent videos, and one of them is W&G Hemmer. Unfortunately she doesn’t turn a corner.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks for that!  I just learned something from the video that I probably should have learned from the manual:  the hemmer I've been using isn't the narrowest -- it's the larger of the two fixed-width hemmers.  I'll have to check and make sure I don't have the smaller one.

(She also has a video showing her piecing quilt blocks on her hand crank W&G while letting her GPS guided tractor plow her farm.  :-)

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Reply with quote  #11 
YEA! Congratulations!

I know a lot say, they could never get the hang of the narrow hemmers, but when you get it down, it makes a nice hem. Or sometimes you just have to say - "It will never be noticed on a galloping horse." I'm kind of surprised that the Singer one didn't work. That is the one I used for the most part and the stitching caught just inside the hem.

Janey

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #12 
I was surprised too.  I'll have to try it on another supposedly compatible machine.  (I assume my 99K should be compatible with 66 attachment, right?)
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Reply with quote  #13 
Yes, it should. As both thread the same way. There is also another "source" that said was for 66, 66k and 99. I couldn't find it in any of my 99 parts lists, however.

Janey

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donnawm

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Reply with quote  #14 
If it makes you feel any better, modern day rolled hemmers are equally unsatisfactory on corners. I have yet to meet another sewist who thinks otherwise!

Donna
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