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Andy Ybarra

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Hello, a few days ago I purchased a White VS2b, as always in very unfavorable conditions, the machine has some missing parts, at some point I will try to get them.
what is interesting is the furniture of the machine, the metal part is very well and I painted it, now it is time to restore the wooden board, so I need the help of experts like you:
1.- I thought it was missing the drawers on the right side but I see that it does not have the holes left by the screws in the rack, so will the model be?
2 .- I have to put a sheet of wood but I need to know what wood is furniture to try to get the most similar, someone knows what wood is?
I have seen in some images of the metallic part where it is seen that the letters of the mark are painted in a golden color, this way they were originally or only it is decoration? would you paint them?
I leave some images and thank you in advance for your comments, greetings.

PD 
Sorry, the pet did not want to wake up

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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #2 
It can be birch or walnut root veneer. Mahogany is harder to find these days. I guess it could be any wood, but those are at least commonly used for root veneer.  It's the grain in the root that gives the caracteristic pattern. It's very often stained and always laquered; some kind of varnish or pure shellac. It can be a bit hard to identify unless you are an expert at it. The grain patter varies a lot within the same type of species and with staining any color and hue can be added. You might need to work a bit to find a matching piece for the top.

The handles of drawers and decorative details are usually brass. I have seen brass handles treated with leaf gold sometimes but usually it's just polished and laquered brass. Some handles look like they are untreated and needs a polish now and then. If there's any white inlay it's usually bone or ivory.

My English could be better, but I think root veneers are called bur or burl in English.  This is the closest I came to your cabinet from a bit of web search, not much info though and it's too dusty to tell what type of vereers used on the top surface.
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Andy Ybarra

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[QUOTE = Mickey] Puede ser chapa de abedul o raíz de nogal. La caoba es más difícil de encontrar en estos días. Supongo que podría ser cualquier madera, pero estas se utilizan al menos para el revestimiento de la raíz. Es el grano en la raíz que da el patrón característico. Muy a menudo está teñida y siempre laqueada; Algún tipo de barniz o laca pura. Puede ser un poco difícil de identificar a menos que seas un experto en ello. El patrón de grano varía mucho dentro del mismo tipo de especie y con la tinción se puede agregar cualquier color y tono. Es posible que tengas que trabajar un poco para encontrar una pieza coincidente para la parte superior.

Las asas de los cajones y los detalles decorativos suelen ser de latón. He visto a veces manijas de latón tratadas con hojas doradas, pero generalmente solo son de latón pulido y lacado. Algunos mangos parecen no tratados y necesitan un pulido de vez en cuando. Si hay alguna incrustación blanca suele ser de hueso o marfil.

Mi inglés podría ser mejor, pero creo que las chapas de raíz se llaman bur or burl en inglés.  Esto es lo más cerca que llegué a su gabinete de un poco de búsqueda en la web, aunque no hay mucha información y es demasiado polvoriento para saber qué tipo de perchas se usaron en la superficie superior. [/ QUOTE]

Hello Mickey, thank you for your comment, what could you tell me about the golden color of the letters "White"? Would you paint them?
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #4 
If I could find traces of gold on the letters I would paint them. If it looks like they were black from the start I would not feel the urge to decorate any further. It's an option I since a lot of White threadles have the letters guilded. I once bought an old oil lamp and the base was painted a grey silver paint. It didn't look very good so I stripped it and it turned out a thick layer of paint covered all kinds of details in the cast metal (probably puter, I'm not sure). A few places there were traces of gold, so at some time it was all guilded. I painted it gold and I still have it, it looks like I might have to repaint it before to long.
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Andy Ybarra

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[CITA = Mickey] Si pudiera encontrar rastros de oro en las letras, los pintaría. Si pareciera que eran negros desde el principio, no sentiría la necesidad de decorar más. Es una opción, ya que muchos hilos blancos tienen las letras guildeadas. Una vez compré una vieja lámpara de aceite y la base estaba pintada con una pintura gris plateada. No se veía muy bien, así que lo quité y resultó que una gruesa capa de pintura cubría todo tipo de detalles en el metal fundido (probablemente puter, no estoy seguro). En algunos lugares había rastros de oro, por lo que en algún momento todo fue gremial. Lo pinté de oro y aún lo tengo, parece que tendré que volver a pintarlo en poco tiempo. [/ QUOTE]

In fact I already applied a layer of black paint, but definitely before I found no residue of gold in the letters, I was also referring to whether there is a possibility that they came out of the factory (with gold letters) or was some fashion in some time past.
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #6 
I don't think anybody knows the small details on your treadle stand anymore, neither do I think any records are kept or made. It's too long ago and not the most common model either. Your cabinet looks like it's common enough for identical irons to turn up, and maybe some in original condition. One problem is to detect if later work  or repair has altered the original paint, and if White had variations on decorative details. There is at least a possibility for letters in gold, it needs a bit of time and patience if you what it confirmed. I'm sure you know well, but in general, some irons were all black and some had names and logo in gold and other colors. There's not much info to go by web search alone at the moment. As for a date 1880s are mentioned. Maybe someone here has more info on this cabinet and machine. I mostly replied because the restauration job on the veneer intersted me.
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Andy Ybarra

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Reply with quote  #7 
[QUOTE = Mickey] No creo que nadie sepa todos los detalles de tu pedaleo. No creo que ningún registro se mantenga. Es hace mucho tiempo y tampoco es el modelo más común. Parece que su gabinete es lo suficientemente común para que aparezcan hierros idénticos, y quizás algunos en su estado original. Un problema es detectar si el trabajo o reparación posterior ha alterado la pintura original y White tuvo variaciones en los detalles. Es al menos una posibilidad para letras en oro, necesita un poco de tiempo y paciencia si usted lo confirma. Estoy seguro de que lo sabes bien, pero en general, algunos hierros eran negros y otros tenían detalles en oro y otros colores. No hay mucha información para continuar solo con la búsqueda en la web, pero la década de 1880 son menciones. Tal vez alguien aquí tiene más información sobre este gabinete y máquina.


Mickey, it's very good to hear your comments, I appreciate your time, regards
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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #8 
Andy Ybara, hello. I have been looking at this a while. Is the entire top missing one slice of Veneer or is the top just missing the Shellac? This might be a lot of sanding instead of veneer. I think the White you have uses plain walnut veneer. You have burl walnut on the drawers in a center panel. I think the top has a center panel out of burl walnut too.

Katie Farmer is writing a book on White sewing machines and their history and it is ( i hope) to be out soon. It will have a mint condition picture in that book of your machine and all the other machines with a better time line and new system for what the machines are. The original list left out many models.

Depending on what the top surface is on your machine, i can help with a good way of getting a lasting finish most original, then a couple new modern methods too.


  John Stuart
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Andy Ybarra

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Reply with quote  #9 
Johnstuart I appreciate your comment, I removed all the wood veneer I had, at this time it is completely sanded and clean to paste a new sheet of wood, I bought sheet metal but also told me that, without sheet could be left, I just hope some tips to decide what I'm going to do, regards
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #10 
Andy, FWIW, if you are restoring the entire cabinet, I would lean towards replacing the veneer. It just looks prettier, and cared for.
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Lori in Wisconsin
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Andy Ybarra

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WI Lori
Andy, FWIW, if you are restoring the entire cabinet, I would lean towards replacing the veneer. It just looks prettier, and cared for.


Hi Wi lori, Thank you for your comment, in fact it's just the base, the drawers and the rack will only carry one seated varnish
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