Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,402
Reply with quote  #51 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwassG
H
I do believe there was a Kayser-labeled version in Germany too. And a Kenmore-version in the US also?


Yes, a Gritztner. a Kayser, a White, a Kenmore, and a Domestic!

__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
Jim/Steelsewing

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,402
Reply with quote  #52 
after waiting to charge the camera batteries and about 8 horrible photos:

DSCN0136.jpg
This is the oldest Gritzner lock ring I have, probably 1955/56. I did check the 57, and it's the same. The little tabs are facing out so that the chrome knob would flex them inward.

If repeated oiling and or use of the Tri-flo still hasn't allowed the hand wheel to move with the chrome knob, there's still a couple more non-invasive and easy tricks to try. I'm thinking it might be time for a hand held hair drier.  The single issue with using a hair-drier is to again, not aim it anywhere near the motor, the wiring, or the belt. To be aimed only at metal bits. Fortunately the Gritzer is nearly all-metal.

My favorite suspect at this point would be the seal around the main shaft as it exits the body of the machine heading to the hand wheel. There are two ways to approach this. The first would be through the inspection plate on the back of the machine. It's a rounded edge square on the top of the pillar on the back side. I'd loosen (don't have to remove) the screw holding it in place and pivot the little square door out of the way to expose the inner workings - then tighten the screw slightly to keep the door open.  (yellow dot is the screw on the plate in photo below, also note the blue arrow and oil point, this is for that all important rear seal).

back.jpg 
Using a hand held hair drier set on high, I'd allow a minute or two of warm air to flow through that door. Vary the angle, but show the left hand side more attention than the rest. Warm air should circulate toward the inside left top area. If the culprit here is hardened oil around the main shaft as it exits to the outside and the hand wheel, that's where the warm air should go.

The 'other' access that could warm the same area... is to lay the machine on it's side like you did when taking a photo of the underside. Aim the hair-drier so that warm air is flowing up the inside of the pillar.  Everything there is all hardened metal, a household hair drier should not have enough omph to damage anything. Just be aware of any plastic looking parts and avoid them with direct heat. I don't think there are any.

Once the machine's inner workings have been warmed apply another drop or two of oil. - Do not - get crazy over zealous and heat it for good while and then spray Tri-flo into the warmed areas. That could create a really not-good-for-you fog. Just not a good idea. 

front01.jpg 
(Have circled the 'important' connections that need oil, the hardest one to reach is the one furthest back marked with the yellow arrow. If possible a drop or two behind that could be very helpful)

The only 'other' area I would want to warm would be behind the face plate (above) and obviously you figured out how to remove it! With the face plate off, again warm the whole area with the hair drier, oil any connection you can - including way back in there where the main shaft exits the body.

Any time during a hair drier warming you can check the hand wheel for movement, but after you have warmed the machine and oiled the machine, letting it sit will not harm its chances at all, just more time for the oil to seep in - and the oil will probably seep in further and deeper as the machine cools. So, again, hours later, or overnight is fine before checking on progress.

I have to admit, it's driving me crazy. I want this machine to spin. Really wish I was there, but then again, maybe it's best this way. By now I may have lost patience and gone looking for small blocks of wood and a hammer (and no, I won't mention what I had in mind). =)


__________________
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.