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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've just begun learning FMQ after getting my Singer 101 up and running.  Prior, I've done mostly machine embroidery work on my Singer 201 and 15-91 and wanted to learn FMQ.  Since I was testing out all the functions on my Singer 101 - and free motion work was on the list - I just continued with my projects on 101.

I know many of you are experts in quilting and free-motion work so anything you can share or point to previous threads would be helpful. So far, the 101 is doing great and I do have a lot to learn.  Please recommend your favorite thread and needle and batting.  Also, what are your favorite patterns and how did you learn?  What sewing machine is your favorite for this work?

Since my daughter is soon to visit from Scotland, I'm making some small silk zipper bags for her to bring back as gifts to her husband and in-laws. I had some small pieces of silk tie fabric and some cotton quilting so this is what I'm using - along with DMC wt 50 cotton thread and a microtex needle.  I'm just doing a kind of loop meander.  See photo.  The hardest part for me is getting the stitches all even so I used the same color thread as fabric so it blends - although after a few attempts I'm getting better.  

The 101 seems to be doing great on this task.  I have a feed dog cover plate and a modern free motion foot.  
Singer101FMQ.jpg 


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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #2 
you're doing great!  The internet (u-tube videos) and PBS sewing shows were wonderful resources for me to get started with fmq.  I began with a slant shank machine (Singer 301A).  I now use a sit down, mid arm machine (Sweet 16).  Lots of good beginner tips out there, and depending on your learning style, many different instructors.  There was an online instructor for beginners by the name of Jeanne Harrison, who sadly, has passed away.  Her site is accessed through Facebook and the instructional videos are through u-tube.  The Midnight quilter is fun to watch, too.  PBS shows that got me going in the beginning were Fons & Porter (sometimes featured longarm instructors, and Sewing With Nancy (also featured various guest instructors) showing sit-down, domestic quilting. 

Doodling on paper or a white board and making lots of practice quilting pieces are probably the best thing to improve.  Developing muscle memory between the hands and brain and then training the hands to move in time with the machine make for uniform stitches.  Personal preferences vary a great deal as to the best thread, needles, etc.  It's so rewarding to be able to finish a quilt by oneself!    Have fun and keep showing us your progress!

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #3 
Mavis has given you excellent advice. Free motion is just that, it's doing whatever you want. You can follow stencils or markings, or not. The key is practice, practice, and practice some more. No one gets good at it overnight. You're doing fine from what I can see. I never could get good at doing anything more than meandering and it started really hurting my hands so when I had the opportunity I finally bought a long arm.

Cari

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #4 
I've just reviewed a few of Jeanne Harrison's videos and this is exactly what I need!  Along with lots of practice!  

My aspirations are quite simple and even if I don't get beyond meandering I'll be okay with that - I can use this for some simple quilts.  If I can do some other interesting patterns then I'll be happy too.  My goal is to use some of the machine/attachments  I have as tools for being productive in sewing.  And the more I branch out the more impressed I am at how well - of course with practice - my vintage machines work.


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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #5 
One thing that I've read over and over and found to be true for me is that a vintage class 15 machine(or any that use a vertical bobbin) work better for free motion work than a class 66(drop in bobbin)machine. I never could get good stitches doing fm work with my 201-2, but almost any of my Japanese machines did great. I never have tried it with my 301s or my FW, though I've watched other people do beautiful work with theirs, those machines are also vertical bobbin.

Cari

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KerieInStitches

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mavis
There was an online instructor for beginners by the name of Jeanne Harrison, who sadly, has passed away.


I had not heard of Jeanne’s passing. How sad! I was in her Facebook group before I jumped off the social media train. She was a talented lady and a great teacher.

I have a couple of Singer 101s. They make a great stitch! I’m anxious to see how it works out for FMQ.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerieInStitches

 

I have a couple of Singer 101s. They make a great stitch! I’m anxious to see how it works out for FMQ.


So far it's working great for the small FMQ work I'm doing along with practicing new techniques.  I wanted to try it out and do a comparison with my Singer 15-91 .    I have not yet experimented with different thread types and weights but with standard cotton 50 wt everything is working fine.  I do have the feed dog cover plate which may be difficult to obtain if you don't have one.  I tried setting the stitch length to zero and free motion without a cover plate but I was experiencing some drag and a less smooth operation than when I use the cover plate.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly


...I do have the feed dog cover plate which may be difficult to obtain if you don't have one.  I tried setting the stitch length to zero and free motion without a cover plate but I was experiencing some drag and a less smooth operation than when I use the cover plate.


I wonder if http://shop.sew-classic.com/Feed-Cover-Darning-Plate-Universal-fit-Most-Machines-P60402.htm would work.

Janey

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench


I wonder if http://shop.sew-classic.com/Feed-Cover-Darning-Plate-Universal-fit-Most-Machines-P60402.htm would work.

Janey


Janey, this cover looks like a real possibility!  I think contacting Sew Classic and asking would be helpful to those interested.  Jenny at Sew Classic is a wonderful resource and has always been responsive to my questions.

This may be very useful info to others with different machines than the 101.  Is there some kind of archive or info filing system on this site that you could add this info.  For example, it would be filed under "Feed Cover Plates"?  This is my first time I was aware of this universal plate.  Many thanks for sharing!


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KerieInStitches

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks so much for the update! Somewhere, I have a small feed dog cover for a Singer someone gave me. I'll have to search it out and see if it fits on my 101. 
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #11 
The feed dog cover (or darning plate) you're looking for has a Simanco number of 66628 stamped on the underside.
It's unusually small, about the size of two half dollars side by side. I haven't tried mine out yet, but I believe the odd
little needle clamp is supposed to be used in junction with the plate (similar to the 201 set-up).

IMG_4249.jpg


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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #12 
Jim that odd little needle clamp is called a stripping foot. It's a type of darning foot, not too common and getting spendier every year.

Cari

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #13 
I have a vintage Singer low shank darning foot (121094) that looks similar to the 101 stripping foot but it doesn't fit on the 101 - the spring is in a different location, see photo.

I've been using a modern darning foot -also in photo- and it works beautifully. I tried FMQ without a foot with not good results -this can work when doing machine embroidery work when you have a stabilizer and your fabric is in a hoop.

I've never seen the 101 stripping foot but I'm fortunate to have the original 101 cover plate that came with my machine.
darning feet.jpg 



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KerieInStitches

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly
Jim that odd little needle clamp is called a stripping foot. It's a type of darning foot, not too common and getting spendier every year.

Cari


One of my 101s came with both of those! I had no idea what the clamp foot was, though. Will it work with other models?
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerieInStitches


One of my 101s came with both of those! I had no idea what the clamp foot was, though. Will it work with other models?


You are very lucky!  I am thinking that the stripping foot and cover plate must have been standard attachment pieces for the Singer 101 - but they are very rare from what I can surmise.  If you have another low shank try it out and report back.

I'm including pages from my manual that discusses the plate and the foot to do embroidery/darning...
101 manual.jpg  Singer 101 manual.jpg 

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerieInStitches


One of my 101s came with both of those! I had no idea what the clamp foot was, though. Will it work with other models?


Yes (ETA should be PROBABLY see following posts). I found it (121094) listed in a parts list for a 99 & 127, but then stopped looking.

It is also shown in the 101 manuals. The part number could be 121094 (see following posts) or 66649.

Janey

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench


Yes. I found it listed in a parts list for a 99 & 127, but then stopped looking.

It is also shown in the 101 manuals. The part number could be 121094 or 66649.

Janey


Janey,  The part number for the 101 foot must be 66649 since the foot I have is 121094 and is different than the 101 foot described in the manual.  Also to note is the 101 foot has a needle clamp that replaces the standard needle clamp when the foot is in use.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaly


Janey,  The part number for the 101 foot must be 66649 since the foot I have is 121094 and is different than the 101 foot described in the manual.  Also to note is the 101 foot has a needle clamp that replaces the standard needle clamp when the foot is in use.


OOOOOOPPPPS, Sorry. The 121094 is the one that attaches to the presser bar and is listed for short shank machines. The 66649 is the needle clamp listed in the 101 parts list from 1921. I looked at the 1951 manual for the 101 and didn't look real close at the darning foot. The 121094 was listed as the darning foot for low shank machines in the 1930s.

My apologies for not thoroughly checking it all out.

Janey

Juat a thought, I'm thinking the 66649 would work on the 66-1 as the screw is on the same side????

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #19 
Begging for clarification, the 101 is a low shank machine, though?
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OurWorkbench

OOOOOOPPPPS,  I looked at the 1951 manual for the 101 and didn't look real close at the darning foot.


They stopped making 101's in 1937...

*just sayin'*

**It is never gang-up-on-Janey day, I'm just befuddled =)

***I've searched all over my circa 1921 needle clamp and can not find a Simanco number - yet.

The manual shows this:

Screen Shot 2019-07-10 at 9.24.36 AM.png 

Screen Shot 2019-07-10 at 9.25.49 AM.png

So... the 101-4 manual above would certainly seem to indicate that darning foot 121094 is the correct foot
for the 101, and if 121094 is for a low shank machine (Singer would need to specify in 1951 because of
slant shank machines) the 101 should be a low shank. -Yes?


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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #21 
Yes, the 101 is a low shank machine.

I do need to be checked on, on occasion.

Actually, the 1951 date is the revision date for a 1936 manual. I'm not sure where I got the pdf about 5 years ago. Indeed, it is for 101-4 and 101-12.

Janey


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #22 
I'm a bit befuddled as well.

My manual is 1929 version that came with my 1930 Singer 101.  The stripping foot in the manual is different from #121094 which I have and this version definitely does not fit on my 1930 101 - see photo.  The spring is in the way of the needle clamp.

 I checked out the needle clamp on my Singer 101, 1926; the needle clamp on this machine is slightly different - see photo.  The cylinder that the screw goes into is slightly shorter on the needle clamp from my Singer 101, 1926.  The surprise is that the darning foot, #121094 fits on this one!  

Maybe the 1926 had it's needle clamp changed at some point?

Singer101 needleclamp.jpg  misfit foot.jpg

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #23 
Chaly, It looks like the spring is bent out of shape. I think it should be on the same plane as the back that it is attached to. The spring should be more like what it looks like in your picture with the modern darning foot in post #13. The spring should NOT interfere with the needle clamp. If I'm understanding right the shorter needle clamp doesn't fit on the machine that you put the 121094 on?

Is the darning/spring stripping foot in the manual you have 86294? I think that is the one that can be used on the 66-1, too.

Just for fun I downloaded http://www.supsew.com/download/Singer/Singer%20101-2,%20-3,%20-10,%20-11.pdf and found that the 66694 was obsolete in 1927 and says to use 86294

I also downloaded https://www.singer.com/sites/default/files/product_manual/SINGER%20101-4%20and%20101-12%20Sewing%20Machines.pdf and realized that the 1936 manual revised in 1951 is the one I referred to above.

Does the needle bar screw work with the longer needle clamp?

There is a thread https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage-antique-machine-enthusiasts-f22/darning-embroidery-vintage-singers-t254622.html Maybe ThayerRags will chime in here?


Janey

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #24 
Janey,

Thanks so much for this information.  This site has been so helpful and I am learning a lot.

For me, if I want to use 121094 I can just use the shorter needle clamp - which I didn't know existed until yesterday - thanks again to this site for getting me to explore.  I know from the picture the spring looks like it might be bent but actually it is not.

For clarification, I only have 121094.  I am using my modern one which is working fine. I now could change the needle clamp from my 1926 Singer 101 and use on my 1930 Singer 101 to use the 121094. It was just a surprise to me to discover the needle clamps were different from my two 101 machines.  

Thanks again for your helpful research and passing along your wisdom!
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