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Mrs. D

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Reply with quote  #1 

No bad luck here.  Today is Friday the 13th.  I attended a garage sale this morning.  A woman was downsizing her quilt shop fabric stash and wools.  Holy Guacamole!  What a great sale ($3 per yard).  Me thinks these fine fabrics are mostly from Primitive Gatherings quilt shop.  

At the sale I bought a lovely vintage quilt.  Unfolding it, my first impression--it is at least full size. 
Wedding Ring Quilt. 

 hand quilted vintage quilt.jpg 
Dating quilt fabrics:  how old this quilt is?  Hand quilted, and scalloped edges with pink binding.  

vintage quilt fabric details.jpg 



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Mrs. D - Wisconsin
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #2 
I'm no fabric expert by any means, but Connecting Threads has a 1930s line out now that a few of your prints look suspiciously similar. This is the fabric line I used in the BOM quilt I made this summer. Scroll down to see the individual fabrics in the line.

https://www.connectingthreads.com/fabrics/general-store/c/430


Cari

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Mrs. D

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Reply with quote  #3 
You are quite right Cari.  Thank you for the link to Connecting Threads 1930s line of fabrics. 

I showed the double wedding ring quilt to a friend Jerry who has a collection (200+) of vintage and antique quilts.  He said the quilt is indeed 1930s fabrics and said the scalloped edge had always been popular, but never so much so as the 1930s--peeking in the 1950s.  He pointed out a number of characteristic print designs.   

I photographed details of some of the quilt's fabrics (below).  Lots of tiny dots interrupted by outlined flowers.  Diagonal lines sometimes mixed with cross hatch.  He had a name for the orange color (which I've forgotten now what he called it).  Talking to Jerry, was well worth the time.  He talked too fast, and I should have taken notes.    

1.jpg  5.jpg  10.jpg  12.jpg 

I searched 1930s fabrics on line, and found a couple more interesting things to share.  Check out those prices on the fabric advertisements.

1930s-fashion-clothing-fabric-colors-at-Vintagedancer-500x603 - Copy.jpg  cotton-fabrics-1930s-Nationals-3-500x623 - Copy.jpg  cotton-fabrics-1937-Sears-56-500x692 - Copy.jpg 


   


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Mrs. D - Wisconsin
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #4 
Imagine all the sewing in those days as the ready-to-wear was not so common.  When I think of the busy days of raising kids, I can't imagine having to also get all their new clothes made before a new school year came around!
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hello Mavis,

  The Mrs. here makes the school uniforms for the 9 year old triplets here (1 boy/2 girls).  She does it on a Singer 201k23 but she also uses a serger (industrial one) almost as much as she uses the straight needle it seems.  She has real talent.  She can take a piece of cloth and make a simple dress in no time and does it on a whim.  And, she gets up at 4am to get the triplets ready for school.  I ask and encourage her to take naps but these are not taken many of the times.  Right now she is tutoring them in the room and they are a handful.  Where this energy comes from I have no idea.....I don't have it that is for certain.  I was non stop today but doing other things such as driving the e-trike to pick them up from school and buying supplies in the city as well as paying for a metal delivery that took place while we weren't here and couldn't pay for it.   We did have a sewer today that is the first time for this lady in over a year.  I bought some white upholstery vinyl and about a week ago or so we bought some black upholstery vinyl.  We took some loose type cord and used it to make black piping for the seams on the white vinyl and a very nice cover was made for our Kennie 158.1914.  We have a row of domestics in one of the rooms (kind of strange around here with all the industrials) that consist of the Kennie, a Janome 2000cpx coverpro, Juki 654de 4 thread serger, and Brother pe-770 computer embroidery.  This weekend I spent almost the entire weekend deep cleaning and organizing.  Since the domestics are so neglected this is going to change and it will become very appealing for use.  The reason why I became involved with sewing is my wife.  If not for her interests and background in sewing her whole life off and on since childhood even helping her mother I wouldn't have ever taken any interest at all likely and would be out trying to build electric velomobile, electric assist trikes, or e-trikes.  As we ramp up here the sewing is starting to become more and more of our days much like I hear Mrs D talk about.  Best regards, Mike
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #6 
Mike, give your wife a pat on the back from me!  Sounds like she is a natural in the garnet sewing area, and I'm glad to hear she has the energy to keep up with the triplets!   You sound like you've taken to the sewing like a duck to water.  It is very satisfying to make something one's self and customize it to your own tastes.  
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #7 
Is it even possible to find Pongee, Dimity, or Poulard today?
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WI Lori
Is it even possible to find Pongee, Dimity, or Poulard today?


I don't even know what those are lol.

Cari

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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #9 
Lori, I'm at a loss here, too.  What do those terms refer to?
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #10 
This is a really good thread.  Just showed the 1930's hand sewn quilt to the Mrs. and also the advertisements you were kind enough to upload.  We are both amazed.  Soon I hope to make quilts for our tree house with no insulation....already got some advice on that.  It'll be a big undertaking.  We got our replacement bobbin and carrier for the other White Family Rotary (that will go in the tree house with an Asian designed treadle table using the bits and pieces that came off of taken apart White treadles from USA.  Of course the legs are not part of that as they were likely repurposed into plant stands or something else.  

Best regards,
Mike

ooops, just realized I'm not supposed to be talking because of a jinx on another V.S.S thread.
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superpickles

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Reply with quote  #11 
Those are fabrics, once common. Dimity was often used for curtains and garments, I don't remember what poulard was for, and unless I am mixing it up with something else I think pongee was a heavier weight garment/utility fabric (but it has been awhile since I ran across the word)
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Ana's Dad

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Reply with quote  #12 
I think it is 'foulard' a light silk or silk cotton print.  Seb please correct me if I'm wrong but I think a poulard(e) in French is a young chicken [smile]
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Reply with quote  #13 
Beautiful quilt and really enjoyed reading this thread too.
I quit collecting vintage/antique quilts. In my mind there is a level of responsibility of care that I can not devote to them. Some people use them and wear them out, and that’s fine for them. My heart wants to preserve them and I do not have the room for many.
I would have loved to dig through that wool collection!

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #14 
Cari, Mavis, those are some of the fabrics mentioned in the ads that Linda posted. (I don't know, either... I thought Dimity is a confection LOL!) (Divinity)
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Lori in Wisconsin
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #15 
Thanks for that clarification...and, Andrew, I thought a young laying hen is a "pullet" but don't claim to be a chicken expert!
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