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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #1 
A year was spent searching ads on ebay, goodwill online, and craigs list. One finally appeared, then two more about a week later. They call each other.

Information about Singer 99k10 is hard to find. Some info and pics at needlebar, see URL at end of this post.

Here are tidbits about my three machines.
Less motor, machine head weighs 10.8 lbs. That is close to featherweight 221 with motor.

ISMACS serial # listing shows 1922 Y prefix range 721131-725630, 755631-759130. My #s 379305, 724097, 758428. First one is is earlier, not listed as Aluminum.

All machines have small disk tensions, however I have a few cast iron 99k in 1922 to 1924 with small disks. The tensions are not interchangeable with normal size.

Two machines have aluminum beltguard/bobbin winder casting.

One machine early style step resistor controller, with aluminum body.

Aluminum machines are spotted by seeing white metal on serial numbers, and under bobbin slide plate.

I fabricated a sheet aluminum base, my wife made a carry tote. A modern motor, with electronic control reduced weight. The 99k10 in tote is 1.4 lbs less that featherweight in case.

Enjoy pictures. Please post 99k10 details you have.
http://needlebar.org/cm/displayimage.php?album=69&pid=1184#top_display_media

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Christy

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Reply with quote  #2 
No pictures?  Do they look identical to the standard 99?
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #3 
Serial number stands out, white metal instead of gray cast iron.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #4 
I was not aware of an aluminum 99 and your info is great especially your comparison to the Featherweight.  It would be interesting to hear thoughts on why Singer dabbled in aluminum at this date and then what changed to discontinue this production.  Also - any comprehensive list on Singer aluminum models?

Your base is very well crafted- amazing talent you have!
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Kitcarlson

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Chaly,
I did some general research about aluminum. Aluminum foil was released around 1910. It takes large amounts of electricity to refine bauxite ore into aluminum. Hydro and steam turbine capability, along with improved electrodes, resulted in boom for aluminum production around 1920.
I think aluminum was an experiment, for manufacturing, and marketing. Aluminum Singer 101 portables, also in the mix. Casting, machining, materials compatibility issues are different. Without prior experince, a swap in base metal likely gummed up the works. The job was done well, no machine locked up, corrosion pits minimal. Sure costs, difficulty increased. It seems like a number of castings manufactured, used, venture abandoned.

When aluminum appeared for 221, it was diecast, thinner stronger process.
Thank you for the kind comments.

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #6 
That's an awesome base.  You have some serious skills.

ADDED:  The machine is also a great find.  I think this is the second I've seen.  Another almost as good option is the Bel Aire Bantam.  They're a Japanese made aluminum version of the 99.  They turn up from time to time.  Certainly a lot less rare than the aluminum 99.
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #7 
I found aluminum Sewmor Tip Top, 99 clone.

Attached Images
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #8 
Bel Airs and Sew Mors were built by the same manufacturer. Every Bel Air sewing machine I've ever seen has a Sew Mor twin.

Cari

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #9 
I have an aluminum 206.
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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #10 
I also have an aluminum 206K43, Miriam, although I much prefer using my 1922 aluminum 99K.  I got the 99k from Goodwill, Alabama in 2013.  This sm, in its bentwood portable case, with foot pedal, weighs only four pounds more than a Featherweight 221, in its case.
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #11 
I forgot about 206. A neighbor has one I helped with, it had a sturdy amount of aluminum.
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stitchntime

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Reply with quote  #12 
Are pre-war Al machines rare because the production numbers were low, or because they were scrapped, or both?  My understanding was that anything that could be scrapped was, and that no Al was used in manufacturing during the war outside of the war effort.

greg
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #13 
Using ISMACS Singer serial numbers listing allocation "Y" series 1922 and 1923, derived following information.

1922 Feb. 25,000 units FE, but my 379305 is AL
Aug. 35,000 units FE
Aug. 4,500 units AL my 724,097
Oct. 3,500 units AL my 758,428
Total 68,000 units only 8,000 AL

1923 Jan. 10,000 FE
Jun. 30,000 FE
Dec. 40,000 FE
Total 80,000 units for comparison

Farmer John, if desired, please post your sn. I have heard of AL outside like my mine, but do not know #s.

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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #14 
my aluminum 99 is s/nY722866, from the 8/1/22 batch.
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #15 
Thank you for posting.

I have noticed a few recently on ebay.


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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #16 
I added hand crank option. Instead of large hand wheel, spare electric wheel was knotched. The hand crank is reworked China crank. Rework involved making larger crank arm pin, wood handle, smoothing castings, reducing end play of shoulder screws, modification of drive lug.

It will be used to piece quilts at clubs.

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