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pgf

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Reply with quote  #1 
Someone on FB advertised their machine, which is clearly a New Family, as being from 1855.  That's clearly wrong (since it wasn't introduced until the mid-1860s), and I wrote to tell them that, and suggest they compare their s/n against the ISMACS list -- I sent them a link.  Of course, 1855 is the last patent date on the slide plate on their machine (and also on my 1871), so it's a common mistake that they made.

They replied with their serial numbers:  they gave both numbers that appear on the plate:  298291 and 212291.  Those numbers are quite a bit lower than the start of the list at ISMACS (which begins with 611,000, dated 1871.  I feel as if I've seen earlier dates in some other table, but perhaps not?  I told him I'd ask around and see what folks think.  Meaning you all.  ;-)

The machine in question:  https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/382564548997041

The primitive bonnet kind of confirms it's pretty early.

paul

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jon

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Reply with quote  #2 
About 1869.  Page 113.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/32677/32677-h/32677-h.htm

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Jon -- I thought it was probably in Cooper, but didn't find it last night when I looked.

paul

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #4 
NICE!  Square corners on the raised bed portion.  Early casting.  And I LOVE the early coffin lid.

also available here
https://sewalot.com/dating_singer_sewing_machine_by_serial_number.htm

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #5 
Yeah, if I didn't already have one...     oh well.  :-)
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johnstuart

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Reply with quote  #6 
Good find!!! That machine would cost $60 in that cabinet with that top in 1866 sales brochure. If you were to take the silver dollars it took to buy it and converted that to todays price on av. circulated coins, it would be $19,080 worth of Morgan silver dollars at 318 a piece today's price. In 1869 that $60 would be a little over a yearly av. wage.

  John Stuart
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