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seb58

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've recently acquired -well... unwittingly won a bid on Ebay on- a 1912 Singer 99K. It came with a motor (but no plug) but given its age I converted it to hand crank.
My question is: how do you remove the bobbin case on these early models?
For the big cleaning when I recived it, I unscrewed the part that has the bobbin lifter but after some research I read that you could remove the bobbin case by lifting the arm of the bobbin lifter piece, shove it to the side and then remove the bobbin case easily.
Problem is, this doesn't work with mine... I can lift the arm alright -although with some difficulty- but then the bobbin case is stuck, even when the hook is in the right position.
Is there a trick I'm missing or are those early bobbin / hook assemblies slightly different from the later ones?

IMG_20200216_151536_resized_20200216_031802503.jpg 
IMG_20200216_151606_resized_20200216_031803028.jpg  On videos I noticed that the arm thingy was substentially sleeker and that there were both a pin and a screw after the wick...
Oh and I have the -very scruffy- original user manual and nothing is mentioned on it.

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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #2 
The part with the screw and red felt wick is called the "position bracket".  The style of position bracket whereby the finger can be lifted and turned, looks like this... here with the finger lifted and turned, using just a finger nail.  From this position the bobbin case would be lifted and moved to the right so that the left side of the bc would clear the hook.
100_2125.jpg

The finger of your solid style position bracket can't be lifted w/o breaking something.  Remove the screw.  First remove the needle plate so that you can see the notch in the bc that prevents it from rotating.  Lift out the bc and the pb.
John

BTW, what is your s/n

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seb58

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you John for all the information. 
I will stop fiddling with it and go for the whole unscrewing when I need to clean underneath [wink]

The s / n is F2611722 
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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #4 
Seb, your 99 appears to be in excellent condition, and very clean.  I like using a 99, especially my 1922 aluminum 99K, s/n Y722866 which is about 18 pounds lighter than the cast iron version.  My 2nd choice for a 99 is one with a knee bar controller.   Enjoy your 99.
Regards,  John
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seb58

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Reply with quote  #5 
It is in excellent condition, as for being clean, I had a job cleaning it; the underneath parts were all rusty and there was decades of lint blocking the hook. Fortunately it had not seen anything but sewing machine oil or nothing at all to be honest, for a while so there was little to do in the way of removing old varnished oil. As for the aesthetics, there again, a fierce cleaning has been done.

I like it too, I have not used it properly on a project but the test sewing I did was very pleasant. It is a quiet and smooth machine I think I will be using it a lot especially if I want to tackle a project in the shade of the cherry tree in my soon-to-be new house. It is much lighter than the 28K I have and much much less noisy; I could sew and have someone take a nap next to me (or the other way round for that matter lol)
regards,
Seb
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
I like the notion of "unwittingly" winning an auction.  :-)
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My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
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seb58

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Reply with quote  #7 
That was the case... I put in a teeny bid on the machine, auction bound to end ages afterwards, then get up one morning with a notification that I had won! I never would have thought to be the only bidder on this pretty little thing which, I failed to mention, came with a bentwood case ๐Ÿ˜‰
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pocoellie

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Reply with quote  #8 
That's a beautiful machine.
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Finnchik

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Reply with quote  #9 

I just acquired (2) 99โ€™s. One was very dirty and had a dangerous looking job of power cord replacement and the other was very pretty and looked just like yours, only it has only the knee bar for control. 

The banged up one I cleaned & replaced the motor/foot, and painted with decaling. The other 1927 99, I have a new knee bar coming tomorrow for it and itโ€™s so pretty, I wonโ€™t be painting it. 9155DB4F-0BAC-489E-B7C2-020B0CF186AB.jpeg 


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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #10 
Beautiful restoration on the 99!  Of all the repaint restorations Ive seen that deviate from the original design, yours tops my list.

Very nicely done.  Could you elaborate on your process?  The paint looks a pearly white?  And the flower decals look handprinted - where did you source your supplies?

Thanks for sharing your work.
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seb58

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Reply with quote  #11 
Pretty! As a rule, I'm not a fan of repainted machines but yours is done beautifully and tastefully. I imagine that Singer would have considered making them a limited series. ๐Ÿ˜‰
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