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Christy

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I picked up a cabinet yesterday with a wide variety of stuff in the drawers.  In the first pic is a little oil can in the center that says "Star".  Where these for sewing machines?

DSC_0849 (750 x 499).jpg  In the next pic I din't know what the black piece at the bottom is.  Maybe it's a part of something?  When I looked up the number for the cover plate at the top, it said for a 66k or a 99k.  Was it only for the "k" version machines?DSC_0850 (750 x 499).jpg  I know at least two of these are sock darners, what are the two on the right with the patterns on them?DSC_0858 (750 x 499).jpg  OK, this is a wild assortment and I'm not sure if they are related.  I recognize the two with blue handles as latch hooks for rug hooking.  And I know the tracing wheel.  I'm lost on the rest!  The large guitar shaped one slides back and forth and the needle at the top has a piece next to it that slides against it.DSC_0859 (750 x 499).jpg


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seb58

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Forgive me but the two wooden instruments with patterns on them look awfully like antique cookie stamps... I may be wrong because why would they end up in a sewing machine drawer?
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Threadedchaos

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I'm pretty sure the wooden pieces are butter molds. The guitar thing I see advertised as a carpet or rug stitcher all the time on ebay.
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superpickles

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The various colored hooks are crochet hooks, the silver one with a rounded hook and a loop on the other side is a button hook for buttoning victorian era boots (the black handle one next to it also looks like a buttonhook to me), and the large safety pin type object is a knitting thing for holding stitches.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #5 
The little black thing is an embroidery attachment for straight stitch feet. These show up from time to time on eBay and other sites, plus I have found a couple in treadle drawers or machine cabinet drawers. They were popular enough to be seen rather often. 

One I have is called the Monogram Embroidery Guide. Most of the ones I have are plain steel or nickel finish. Yours is the first one I have seen in blued steel. 

The square oil bottle is aftermarket, common as clay in old treadle and cabinet drawers. They were popular in the old days and could be found almost everywhere including fishing tackle boxes and gun cabinets and tool boxes. I have several - some oval, some round, but no square ones like yours. Nice to look at, but all of my attempts to seal them with new cork or gaskets have failed. They always leak. Never let them lay down with oil in them. I keep mine empty just as eye candy. 

-Bruce
Monogrammer  label.png 

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Christy

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by seb58
Forgive me but the two wooden instruments with patterns on them look awfully like antique cookie stamps... I may be wrong because why would they end up in a sewing machine drawer?


It's rare for me to pick up sewing machines that have lived their life in a single home or family. This cabinet came from a cleaning out where it looked like the previous owner was a hunter/gatherer of vintage items.  I would think they grouped stuff together that they saw similarities in.  The butter press?  is close enough to the sock darner to go into the same drawer until they learned otherwise.

Ok good, the rug patcher?, darner? feels correct on that.  I could imagine how that works.  

Buttonhook!  OK that makes sense. 

Thanks!



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Christy

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonesHand52
The little black thing is an embroidery attachment for straight stitch feet. These show up from time to time on eBay and other sites, plus I have found a couple in treadle drawers or machine cabinet drawers. They were popular enough to be seen rather often. 

One I have is called the Monogram Embroidery Guide. Most of the ones I have are plain steel or nickel finish. Yours is the first one I have seen in blued steel. 

The square oil bottle is aftermarket, common as clay in old treadle and cabinet drawers. They were popular in the old days and could be found almost everywhere including fishing tackle boxes and gun cabinets and tool boxes. I have several - some oval, some round, but no square ones like yours. Nice to look at, but all of my attempts to seal them with new cork or gaskets have failed. They always leak. Never let them lay down with oil in them. I keep mine empty just as eye candy. 

-Bruce
 


Thanks Bruce!  I think the oil can is cute, but thanks for the heads up on not to trust it with oil in it!  I guess that one goes into a display.  Thank you for finding and posting the information on the attachment part.  That's interesting.  I haven't seen one of these before.

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #8 
I have often wondered about some items in treadle drawers that I find. Things like an apothecary weight make some sense as it can be used to hold fabric from sliding off the table, and a button hook is fairly common not only for shoes of the day but to aid in fishing out the thread from under the presser foot when bringing up the bobbin thread. 

I found a nice antique wooden pie crimper too. Someone may have thought it was a pattern wheel, perhaps, but I think it may have been put in the treadle drawer - and possibly the butter molds too - because Grandma didn't want anyone getting their grubby little hands on them and no one who wants to live live outside of a wheelchair would ever get into Grandma's treadle drawers if they knew what was good for them. Also, most treadle and cabinet drawers in those days had locks. 

As a child, my most vivid near death experience was going into my mother's sewing things for a pair of scissors or something. I learned quick. 

-Bruce
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #9 
It's always fun to go through the collections stored in these cabinets.  Sometimes for me this has been more interesting than the machine.  I've found very rare attachments- a two thread embroidery, fagotter, etc. and one time I found a solid silver bar.  Of course, with the silver bar I contacted the seller and she was so appreciative.  She said it belonged to her daughter and did not realize it was in the drawer.  After I returned it she offered rewards in more sewing attachments!

But I've never found kitchen stuff - like a butter mold!
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Amatino

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You learn such interesting stuff on this site! [smile]
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amatino
You learn such interesting stuff on this site! [smile]


Agreed -- I always thought those hooked implements were for tightening boot laces.  Never knew one could hook buttons!

paul

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penny

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Reply with quote  #12 
In the last photo next to the button hook is a punch needle for hooking rugs https://halcyonyarn.com/rug-making/68540101/oxford-punch-needle-12-number-8. The "needle" on the far right in that same row looks to be a locker hook
https://halcyonyarn.com/rug-making/68540071/locker-hook .  There are some other rug making tools in that picture this link may help you identify them https://halcyonyarn.com/rug-making/ .
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #13 
I don't know where to start. It looks like most of the things have been identified.

The cover plate will work on the 66 & 99 machines made in America. I can't tell if the adjustable hemmer is a low shank or slant shank. It looks like it might be for a short shank, but I see in the first picture what might be a manual for a 301. The bobbins look like FW or 301 bobbins. The 301 is a slant shank machine.

The stocking darners (three of them) might also be used for glove darners. I think the other are butter molds, too.

I see only two latch rug hooks. The little greenish one above left would be a traditional rug hook. The third from the left, just before one of the boot hooks (aka button hook), is for the punch type of rug hooks. A site I found telling about hooked items and that shows the different tools used is https://amyoxford.com/pages/faq I learned about "hooked" items when I was a teen. My BIL's aunt and uncle, who were from New England, had some chairs that the seats were hooked. It looked like needlepoint but I found out that they were actually hooked with wool strips.

I always thought that hooks like the one with the loop and black handled one were boot hooks. When I got one with a Singer 626 Touch & Sew machine, I thought it rather odd. Then I found out that they were calling them button hooks, which makes more sense and are very handy for hooking buttons and bringing through a loop or buttonhole. The hook that came with the 626 was a Penney's advertisement. I later got another that is fancier and might have a cellulose handle. The fancier one can be seen at #26 on https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/colorado-gettogether-9499001?&trail=50


Does your guitar shaped wooden item have a patent date on it? Mine did (1891-patemt 463548) and can be seen at post #77 on https://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/colorado-gettogether-9499001?&trail=100 I found some further information about what the patent calls a "Turfing Implement" There were several other patents called Turfing Implements, too. There was another in 1906 (patent 836623) that looks very similar. Ross' patent 463548 references his prior patent 251381 which is called an Embroidery Machine.

I can't figure out what the blond wood handled items are - other than the tracing wheel. It seems like I have seen one like the blunt tip one, but can't remember in what context.

Have fun with your found goodies.

Janey





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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #14 
Hello group,

  I am pasting an image of a machine below.  I already know a bit about this machine but I'm trying to figure out who might have made it as it might have been badged for the original maker.  Please let me know your thoughts.  Best regards, Mike
Helen Blanchard's 1872 zig-zag sewing machine
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JonesHand52

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I don't have one, but it looks like a Florence to me. - Bruce
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #16 
Hi Bruce,

  This is a special function machine.....hint  look very closely at the circle of metal below the presser foot.  I'm not giving out too much information and even though it is kind of like a puzzle I'm not giving out what I know about the machine in hopes there is someone who can figure out who made this machine in any kind of volume.

Best regards,
Mike
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #17 
I already know the secret about this machine, just figured it was based on a Florence. I read your private message and went to the links. Let's see how long the secret takes to come out from the rest of the forum. 

Side note - I really, really want one of these. 

-Bruce
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Christy

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Reply with quote  #18 
Thanks guys!  Everyone here is so knowledgeable!  The hooking sites were informative.  I had a needle punch embroidery tool years ago but it was a fancier version so I just wasn't sure about some of these punch tools.  The button hook/boot hook is pretty cool.  The Victorian books buttoned up the sides so that's why it could be called either button or boot hook.

I can't find a patent date or any information on the guitar shaped piece.  Although it's interesting to me, I don't really think of it as sewing related.  I need to find a hooker who's into that kind of thing! [comp][sneaky][sneaky][crazy]



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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #19 
The guitar shaped thing is a rug hooker or rug tufter. They are used for making all kinds of things similar to what can be done with a Singercraft guide. Besides making rugs, they can be used to make pillows, bags, vests, jackets, wall hangings, etc.; virtually anything you can imagine. 

I got my first rug tufting tool in the mid 1970s when I got a kit with tools from Rugcrafters in a local mall. Since then, and more recently even, I have collected a variety of these tools in different forms from several auction sites. 

I find them interesting and the number of types or styles is amazing. Yours is almost identical to a Susan Burr model I have in original box with instructions. 

You may want to give it a try and see how much fun it is to make something with it. My collection of these things is growing. I intend to make some rugs with them this Winter for some of my cabinets and treadles. 

-Bruce Rug making instructions.jpg 

 
Attached Files
pdf Rug Hooker - John E. Garrett - Bluenose rug hooker US1605711.pdf (910.01 KB, 4 views)
pdf Rug Making Tool Patent - G.H. Morrow, Oct. 23, 1934 - USPatent 1, 1977.pdf (422.46 KB, 3 views)
pdf Rug tufting instructions - susanburr.pdf (219.79 KB, 4 views)

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hello group,

  OK no takers on guessing the machine or attempts...been a day so I'll put the info out.......it is the patent model of Helen A. Blanchard's zig-zag machine.  Her machine is on display in the Smithsonian.  Her patent was approved in 1873 but I've read she had to take out a loan for it in Boston so it was first made before that date.  She is the "lady Edison" of the 1800's having been granted 28 patents passing at the age of 82 having been born to a wealthy family in 1840 that lost all their fortune in the financial crisis of 1866 she moved to Boston.  No formal engineering training but sharp as a tack/mechanically oriented she formed the Blanchard overseam company.  Died a wealthy lady and was able to buy back the house her family lost in 1866.  Truly amazing story.  Wikipedia article below.  Her 1876 patent, in my opinion, also makes her the inventor of the break apart seam but done with zig-zag.  That patent is amazing to look at with the picture brought up in a separate window to study all her seams in her patent.  In some ways she was the inventor of the overlock if one considers the zig-zag overcast stitch one but then again overlocks have the requirement of loopers so Mr. Merrow gets credit for that in 1881.  There was another discussion of earliest zig zag attachments and machines on another thread but Ms. Blanchard's was not mentioned.  I've been unable to find anyone who can identify the maker of her amazing machine.  Possibly it was a modified Florence?  Surely there are experts on this group that can help identify it better.  Nobody seems to know.  An amazing lady who deserves tribute. 

Best regards,
Mike
Helen Blanchard - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Helen_Blanchard
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #21 
Wow....  That is amazing.  New bookmark for a research project.

That machine HAS to be made by Florence, or by someone with access to their molds.  Too many details are the same.
FB_IMG_1568575507999.jpg 


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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by superpickles
T...the silver one with a rounded hook and a loop on the other side is a button hook for buttoning victorian era boots...

I was going to say it was a corset tightening hook - I have one very similar to it and it works for that purpose very well.

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