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Bags

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Reply with quote  #1 
Is there information somewhere on what the original fabric or covering of the pad on sewing stools was?  Not sure if this is making sense.  The stool pad I got yesterday needs to be restored if possible, or just replaced.  

I'm just curious about what it might be.

Thank you
Carol

p.s. - I'm sorry if there's a thread on here and I just haven't found it.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #2 
Carol, I don't know what the names are for the original materials. Vinyl, naugehyde...
Here are some photos of original:
#2 is for an art deco cabinet.

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_20200119_161750.jpg (232.93 KB, 13 views)
jpeg IMG_20200119_161759.jpg (201.58 KB, 12 views)
jpeg IMG_20200119_161834.jpg (161.98 KB, 10 views)


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Lori in Wisconsin

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #3 
And recovered:

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_20200119_161808.jpg (219.32 KB, 12 views)
jpeg IMG_20200119_161823.jpg (221.87 KB, 12 views)


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Lori in Wisconsin

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Bags

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Reply with quote  #4 
Lori, those turned out beautifully!  I didn't want to rip off the mystery material on this stool, mahogany #40, and then find out it's rare piece, that I would get put it VSM jail for.  Didn't think it would be, but my luck ...
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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #5 
I didn't want to take the original material off my stools either, so I just covered over them.  Imagine being put in VSM jail and then imagine what the bail would be....Not your firstborn, but your best VSM!!!!  [tongue]
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Bags

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Reply with quote  #6 
Oh geez hilltophomesteader, first off, I obviously didn't think of that.  Good idea too!  My only thought was when I took the pad/top off the stool, there was some sort of white, chalky residue where the material touched the wood.  A little on top, mostly on that area of the material.  Took a toothbrush, gentle soap and water to it.  A lot came off, but still needs a good cleaning.  Hence, new material.

I'll just say there were some times, I would have gladly given them my firstborn.  Not so much anymore.  I'd also like to keep my (at least for now) best VSM! 
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #7 
Carol, the blond stool came to me from Macybaby, complete with the great leaf fabric on the cover. She shipped that stool to me, disassembled, and in a box with a very small footprint. Reassembly was easy!
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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #8 
Here is my blonde trappy bench, just recovered
John
100_2085.jpg 

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Bags

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Reply with quote  #9 
Lori, how wonderful about the stool from Macbaby!  Another example of what a great forum this is!

Farmer John, that is lovely! 

Okay, now I'm on the hunt for something to put on this stool of mine.  Oh, wait I have to clean the machine, but first I have to ...

Carol in Maine
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #10 
Beautiful recovering of stools, all of you!  I ventured into reupholster one time on a chair for my daughter's apartment.  Good to get it out of my basement and have it be used by someone again.  However, the removal of old material and those sharp little nails isn't something I would be eager to repeat!  It did turn out kind of cute, and my daughter picked out the fabric that she wanted, so she loved it!  I don't think that's a hobby I would be happy to pursue, myself.  My back still hurts thinking about it!
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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #11 
I wouldn't worry too much about getting in trouble recovering them. 
Far better to have a nice looking usable stool than a ragged dirty unrestored one IMO.
I've done a few small reupholstery projects and enjoy them.  I'd like to learn more.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #12 
Lori and Farmer John - Nice recovering of the cabinet stools.  

From what I've seen, the original covers were a type of vinyl material.  I recovered my stool from my Singer 65 cabinet with some leather scraps which had to be pieced:

65 cab stool.jpg 

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #13 
RE covering for sewing stools - You could go white leather, rhinestones and chrome studs, kind of an Elvis in Las Vegas look. 

-Bruce
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Bags

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Reply with quote  #14 
Rodney, I agree, I'd rather enjoy the stool and use it, than not.  So another new thing to learn!

Chaly, lovely looking stool.  Not even going to try and match up seams and points on my first try.  But something to shoot for.

Bruce, yea, I could.  I'm thinking not very comfy with the rhinestones and studs!  [biggrin]
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #15 
Gorgeous stool, Chaly!
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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #16 

I have seen different coverings. However, a word of advice, do not get rid of the old horse hair padding. It has lasted a long time and gives the same cushion and support that it did when it was new. i had one that was filthy. After I uncovered it, I placed some mesh on top to support it and beat it until I got as much of the dust & dirt out of it that I could. Then with the mesh still in place, I vacuumed it. Then recovered it. I did not try to stay original. I have seen green pleather; black pleather; the later models had a brown naugahyde. Photos of mine. The black leather one had an orange fuzzy cushion glued to it. Yuck. Here are photos of some of mine. 

A friend used the back of a thrift store men's black leather coat to cover hers with the seam down the back. It looks very original. Very much like my black one with fuzz. Those are the last two photos, her before and after. 

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_3378.jpg (417.58 KB, 9 views)
jpeg IMG_3376.jpg (525.08 KB, 11 views)
jpeg IMG_3375.jpg (540.72 KB, 12 views)
jpeg IMG_0736.jpg (317.20 KB, 12 views)
jpeg Stool with back.jpg (129.39 KB, 12 views)
jpeg Alice's stool b4.jpg (46.73 KB, 15 views)
jpeg Alice's stool after.jpg (85.28 KB, 12 views)

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Bags

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Reply with quote  #17 
ellellbee, being new to this, I had no idea!  Thank you for the info, the advice and the photos.  Very nice. 

The stool won't happen this weekend, but I'll file this away in my how-to folder.

Carol
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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bags
ellellbee, being new to this, I had no idea!  Thank you for the info, the advice and the photos.  Very nice. 

The stool won't happen this weekend, but I'll file this away in my how-to folder.

Carol


My recovered ones. Don't remind me that i put the Singer fabric on sideways. 

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_3381.jpg (280.41 KB, 14 views)
jpeg IMG_2226.jpg (278.47 KB, 17 views)

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charley26

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Reply with quote  #19 
This is how I have recovered any drop in seats from stools or chairs of mine that needed recovering. I have added some extra padding to some of the chair seats for that extra bit of comfort.
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Marie
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #20 
So, our 6 dining room chairs need reupholstering, both fabric and padding.  (They're only 20 or 25 years old, so no horsehair or coir fiber.)  Any tips on what we should use for the padding part, that will last another 20 years?  The seats are simple square shapes, much like those sewing stools.  We don't want overstuffed -- just enough to keep our dinner guests from squirming.
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellellbee


My recovered ones. Don't remind me that i put the Singer fabric on sideways. 


That Singer fabric is quite the touch - really nice!
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purplefiend

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Reply with quote  #22 
Everyone did a beautiful job on recovering their sewing stools!

I have 2 of the Singer cabinet stools.  I would love to find a way to make them sturdy enough for me to use them. They'd be better for using with a treadle machine, rather than the rolling office chair.
Sharon in Texas

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charley26

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
So, our 6 dining room chairs need reupholstering, both fabric and padding.  (They're only 20 or 25 years old, so no horsehair or coir fiber.)  Any tips on what we should use for the padding part, that will last another 20 years?  The seats are simple square shapes, much like those sewing stools.  We don't want overstuffed -- just enough to keep our dinner guests from squirming.


If they are the 'drop in' style, I would/do use a Dacron wadding - similar to poly batting, but thicker and more coarse than the poly batting used in quilts. I use a few layers, and add some wool batting on top. Then I use a staple gun to tack calico at regular intervals around the seat base. The calico needs to be tacked under tension to achieve a good shape. Then apply the top fabric of choice in the same manner. Add a piece of fabric to the underside if you wish, also with the staple gun.
The Dacron wadding I used is from an upholstery supply place, I find the calico is necessary to keep the shaping better, and it is easier to attach your fabric choice too.
These are 2 examples of my completed chairs.

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_2006.jpg (169.80 KB, 10 views)
jpeg IMG_2007.jpg (263.37 KB, 10 views)


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Marie
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ellellbee

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplefiend
Everyone did a beautiful job on recovering their sewing stools!

I have 2 of the Singer cabinet stools.  I would love to find a way to make them sturdy enough for me to use them. They'd be better for using with a treadle machine, rather than the rolling office chair.
Sharon in Texas


Are the legs loose? If so the corner brackets in the storage area may need to be redone with larger screws. Add some glue to the hole and the joints before doing this. Make sure the screws aren't too long but make them a bit longer if you can so you hit fresh wood. If the legs can come completely off, then also glue them in first and use a belt clamp to hold them while the glue dries. Use recessed, flat head screws in an area that wasn't screwed before and make sure they are flush with the surface, then put the brackets back on. Don't rush to use them. Give it a few days to dry and set thoroughly. 

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by charley26


If they are the 'drop in' style, I would/do use a Dacron wadding - similar to poly batting, but thicker and more coarse than the poly batting used in quilts. I use a few layers, and add some wool batting on top. Then I use a staple gun to tack calico at regular intervals around the seat base. The calico needs to be tacked under tension to achieve a good shape. Then apply the top fabric of choice in the same manner. Add a piece of fabric to the underside if you wish, also with the staple gun.
The Dacron wadding I used is from an upholstery supply place, I find the calico is necessary to keep the shaping better, and it is easier to attach your fabric choice too.
These are 2 examples of my completed chairs.



Marie -- thank you!   Yes, they're drop-in style, completely surrounded by frame as in your second pic.  So, no foam at all, just the Dacron and wool batting -- good to know.  And at the end you say the calico is easier to attach the final fabric to.  But surely I don't attach the final cover to the calico, right?  I staple it to the base, just like I'll staple the calico?

paul

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charley26

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Reply with quote  #26 
Yes Paul. Stretch/attach the calico to cover the Dacron and staple it to the base, alternating front, back, side and other side, a few staples at a time. When it is smooth and wrinkle free neaten and fold the corners and staple to secure. I just like to add a layer of wool batting on top of the Dacron, I think it just feels better to touch. Then repeat with your chosen fabric, attaching with staples to the base so that the calico is covered/concealed.
The corners can be tricky, but just take your time to get a neat and pleasing finish.

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Marie
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Bags

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Reply with quote  #27 
All of these reupholstering projects are beautiful!  Very nicely done.  Thank you everyone for the advice, tips, tricks and especially the photos.  They're all going in restore folder.

Carol
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