Victorian Sweatshop Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 3 of 3      Prev   1   2   3
Mavis

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,069
Reply with quote  #101 
Cari, I just finally got back to this thread.  Thanks for the explanation.  "End loading" is very obvious, once you know!  
__________________
Mavis
from Minnesota
0
JonesHand52

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 486
Reply with quote  #102 
There is often a difference in boat shuttle and cylinder shuttle bobbins as per size and capacity. Cylinder shuttles all tend to be roughly the same size, some longer than others, but generally the overall capacity of each is fairly even. However, boat shuttles (transverse shuttles) vary considerably with make and model. I have some with bobbins just as big as a Singer 27, but one that is about 1/2 that size, my little Winselmann Saxonia hand crank. 

I think mostly the smaller ones are hand crank machines, but some are just more ancient designs, such as my Jones Hand hand crank. That little unit even uses leather parts in the works such as the thread adjustment which has a T-section piece of leather as a shoe or pad, and the bobbin winder wheel is leather. I had to replace these when I restored the machine to use. 

The tiny bobbins some of these TS machines use also makes it a do-it-yourself project to get more than the one that came with the machine in some cases. In that regard these machines would be my last choice for a serious project requiring any reasonable bobbin capacity. However, my larger TS machines, such as my Frister & Rossmanns are about equal to what the Singer 27 has for a bobbin. I think I could use a Singer bobbin in them. 

- Bruce
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 893
Reply with quote  #103 
This is helpful information, Bruce; thank you.
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 893
Reply with quote  #104 
Here's a linen top I just finished - to have a deviation from all the mask sewing!
My Singer 101 was used for construction, including the binder attachment.

For the decorative stitching, I used my vintage Elna - using the feather stitch (cam 107) and the scallop edge stitch (built in or cam 35).  Many machines with decorative stitches/cams can do these common stitches. The feather stitch is a reverse cam decorative stitch.

The scallop edge stitch is usually intended to finish the folded edge of fabric (first photo).  My pattern/design called for a raw edge on the sleeves, hem, and bow - so I used the scallop stitch at the edge of the raw edge to have some fraying but also to control the amount of fray.

The feather stitch I used to topstitch the neck binding edge, sleeve edges, and hem.

shell edge.jpg  linen top.jpg  linen top bow.jpg  linen top edges.jpg 



0
pgf

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,216
Reply with quote  #105 
Nice effect!
__________________
My machines: http://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/by-age
0
Mavis

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,069
Reply with quote  #106 
I like your decorative stitches!  Nicely done.
__________________
Mavis
from Minnesota
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 893
Reply with quote  #107 
I just finished my first quilt - will probably gift as a baby quilt due to it's size.  I'm working to build up my quilting techniques and this project was to give me practice on piecing and working with HSTs.  I love so many of the HST quilt patterns that I thought I better get some skill making and piecing them.  I didn't follow a pattern and used a scrap bag of Moda strips - cutting them to separate colors and then using the accordian method to make scrappy 2.5" HSTs.

I didn't want to add in free motion work since I'm doing enough new things with this project. so I decided to quilt using decorative stitches - Elna cam # 154.  This is a reverse decorative stitch and did not require a walking foot due to the reverse action.

Piecing was done with my Singer 48K, binding attached using Singer 101 with Swiss zigzagger walking foot attachment, and quilting on Elna Carina.

quilting stitchines.jpg  quilt done.jpg 

0
WI Lori

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,337
Reply with quote  #108 
Beautiful quilt, Chaly! And amazing piecing and quilting.

So, do you like making quilts now? [wink]

__________________
Lori in Wisconsin
0
Mavis

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,069
Reply with quote  #109 
Chaly, welcome to the world of quilting!  Congratulations on your first finished quilt!!!  It's so lovely, and I hope it inspires you to make more quilts.
__________________
Mavis
from Minnesota
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 893
Reply with quote  #110 
Thanks Lori and Mavis.

I liked the process cause I was learning and it was a mystery since I didn't know what I was going to end up with.  I decided I didn't want to spend a bunch on fabric for practice but didn't want cheap quality so I just got a scrap bag of good quilting fabric-didn't know what I was going to get or colors or anything.  When I saw the scraps, I thought to just make a bunch of scrappy HSTs.  I didn't know how many I would get or how I would put them together.  It was fun once they were made to come up with some different patterns.  And I just used muslin for the back and border.  I think the colors and size would be an appropriate baby girl quilt - although this was not in the plan during the construction.

I have some ideas for a quilting project that I could use - maybe a lap quilt or a table runner.  I also have some weddings coming up so maybe some gifts. So, I'll be quilting again but not doing so many small HSTs in a project.  I think I have them down for now.
0
Cari-in-Oly

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,953
Reply with quote  #111 
That's a really nice quilt for a first one Chaly. Great job. You could absolutely use this for a lap quilt too.

I usually use muslin as quilt backing on everything except baby quilts. I don't like to piece backings and extra wide fabric can be really spendy for a large quilt. Good quality wide muslin can be found at reasonable prices, and who cares what the back looks like anyway, you only pay attention to the front!

Cari

__________________
Olympia Washington
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 893
Reply with quote  #112 
Thanks, Cari.  There's a lot to quilting and it's really an art in many different dimensions.  
I agree with you on the muslin - and I just happen to like muslin - the way it feels and also how a plain backing can "relax" everything that's going on with the top.

I've only learned I have a lot more to learn!  But it's fun along the way!
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 893
Reply with quote  #113 
I'm making a blouse and needed to secure down some bias binding areas around the neckline to help improve the drape.  I decided to use my Necchi Supernova - decorative stitch #67.  This stitch is functioning as both a decorative (although subtle) and utility stitch.  I used water soluble stabilizer to prevent the fine silk fabric from being chewed up by the larger needle hole in the zigzag plate.

Then I was thinking - many vintage decorative stitch machines don't really have officially defined utility stitches but many of the decorative stitches can be used as utility stitches too.
Any reverse motion decorative stitch that is not a filled in stitch would be a candidate.  Although I've never had the fortune to have one - many of the Kenmores come to mind as having several reverse decorative stitches. And for machines that don't have reverse decorative stitches - such as the Singer slants, the multi-stitch zigzag would be a great utility stitch for overcasting, etc.

I used stitch #67 on some knit scraps from a recent project and it worked wonderfully as a stretch stitch and would be a perfect stitch to overcast.  And this was without even using a ball point needle - no skipped stitches.

Anyway,  here are some photos.   First, the blouse edges showing Necchi SN stitch #67, Necchi stitch chart, and stitch #67 on knit fabric.

necchi stitches blouse.jpg  necchi stitches.jpg  necchi 67 on knit.jpg 

0
Phyllis1115

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 238
Reply with quote  #114 
Nice examples of stitches and stitch combinations. Do you keep them with the machine stitch and cam numbers?

When my daughter was young, I sewed and knitted most of her clothing. I used my Elna SU/Blue Top's decorative stitches. Back in the '70s, "rag stitching" was the in thing. I combined cams and built in stitches to achieve the popular "store bought" look. 

My mom enjoyed mending garments and household linens. She even mended dishtowels with hand stitches. When she visited me, she completed all of the garments awaiting mending. She left us nearly 50 years ago. I still miss her. 

__________________
-Phyllis in Iowa
"Is this Heaven?"  "No, it's Iowa."   (Field of Dreams)
0
Chaly

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 893
Reply with quote  #115 
Thanks, Phyllis. I mostly follow  the stitch charts, but Necchi SN, like the Elna SUs have almost an unlimited amount of stitch patterns by recombining the cams.  I keep wanting to make a stitch pattern book but have not gotten around to this project yet.

What special memories you have of your dear mom.  She must have passed on a passion of sewing to you. 
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.