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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #1 
It seems to me that finding a new timing belt for some of the more popular vintage machines (Pfaff 130 comes to mind) is difficult to say the least. Finding a new belt for a really obscure vintage machine appears to be impossible (my Adler). I thought (?) I heard mention of a method of making a new belt on the machine. IE: lay the machine down and some how wrap and apply material x.

If there is such a method, does anyone know where I can find references to it? There's a possible long shot opportunity at a very unusual 1950s machine and before I even give it a go, I'd like to have a clue if there is indeed a process to build-a-belt.

thanks

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Threadedchaos

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Reply with quote  #2 
Don't know how much this helps. I made a belt for my adler this way. Bought some nylon marking string from Lowe's. It is a mustard yellow. I wrapped it around the gears and holding the beginning and end strands tight used a bit of copper wire to crimp the ends together. The wire was big enough to recess into the gear. Then slowly continued crimping the wire around the string at each cog. It's slow going. It wasn't pretty but I was surprised that there was no noise and the belt worked great.
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #3 
There are replacement belts available. It all depens on what you are willing to pay for it. You can use german words like; adler, nähmaschinen, zahnriemen, etc, for the search engine. I don't have the time to search now, but I know they repair these old machines in Germany, often using rubber replacement belts with out the metal cleats. What does this look like? Or this? Does anyone read French? It's not easy at all, but I suspect it's all about identifying the correct producer and dimensions for the compatible replacement part.


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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #4 
After a mad search today the machine in question appears to be -originally- a Turissa Ultramatic. This is a Swiss born machine created in the very early 50s. Somewhere around 1953ish Gritzner purchased Turissa and the machines were made in Germany with the Gritzner bobbin requirements. Little else was changed. It is unclear as to how long Gritzner continued making the model, but it was around as late as 1956 when it was also labeled for White.

image.jpg 
This machine may have beaten Elna to the punch. There were cams that inserted behind the name plate for deco stitches.

One of these days I'm going to throw my hands up in surrender and go back to something easy. Ha.


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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #5 
There's been a guy on eBay on and off who will rebuild your Pfaff belt for you - but he isn't cheap. He could probably do an Adler would be my guess.
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #6 
I don't think Elna was the first machine with cams, but the Supermatic (1952) was the first with double layer cams and back stitch action. The first zigzag freearms are probably Bernina 125s in 1944, I think Husqvarna first similar model was 1947 (suspiciously similar look). Bernina 530 was introduced in 1954, built in single layer cam stack.

I think the old flat bed, cast iron zigzaggers like Pfaff 130, Bernina 117 and Necchi BU had stitch cam options. I have never found a date of introduction for the stitch cam attachment, but it looks like it came later than the machine model in itself. 

There are close similarites with the early freearm zigzaggers. Part of the reason is that Bernina made sewing machines for several other German brands after the war. Some Gritzner models were built in Swiss factories, different brands and very similiar models make the origin of their mechanical engineering harder to track down. Husqvarna didn't really need to outsource their production after WWII, but still there has to be some connection to Bernina 125 and their early freearm. I assumed it was Husqvarna that bought up Turissa, but only because of a few rare Husqvarna models with Turissa in their name.  

It needs a bit of investigation.
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #7 
From what I can glean (and granted I've only been at it a little) Turissa is Swiss. It looks like they were in business making/selling sewing machines from 1950 (The Automatica model) and I read somewhere that they went on until 1967. If this is true, then Turissa built the machines for G/K, who, in turn, labelled them for White (thank goodness White didn't turn them over to Sears or my mind would be going). Both Elna and Turissa use the exact same friction type drive wheel on an internal mounted motor (Elna is pinned, Turissa is screwed on). I'm sure there are other similarities and perhaps drive belts are shared between Turissa Husq/Viking models if all of these were being produced in the same facilities. If this is true, then perhaps a drive belt for a Viking 2840  would work. Yep. A ways to go here, but some information is seeping in.
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My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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Saxonbowman

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Reply with quote  #8 
McMaster Carr has a variety of toothed belts https://www.mcmaster.com/drive-belts/timing-belts-and-pulleys-4/ If you can measure the dimensions and tooth pitch you might find something there.
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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #9 
That's what I hope to do soon, once we're allowed to travel again. Since the gentleman has two machines, one with and one without and is open to offers on either I think I'd like to give the without a go and measure the one with a belt right there. Then cross my fingers and go a hunting. Perhaps McMaster Carr would have one then. Good to know. Thank you.
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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood.
There is grace within forgiveness, but it's so hard for me to find - Ben Gibbard
My adventures with VSM's: http://steelsewing.blogspot.com
*QuiltnNan and asshat may be synonymous...
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TwassG

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Reply with quote  #10 
The company behind Turissa was the "Nähmaschinenfabrik Brütsch & Co". The founder was an engineer at Gegauf (Bernina) and the man behind the Bernina Cl 105. There were close ties between both companies that ended shortly after Brünings death. His daughter in law (meaning her new husband) took on the task to lead the company. Not long after renaming (to Turissa) the company started to struggle and in the late 1960s Husqvarna took over. 

Those yellow synchroflex belts were used in a lot of european machines at that time. Pfaff had them in their 230. When realising that those belts started to fail, Pfaff started a huge replacements programm behind the scenes. Everytime a machine with a failing belt came into inspection (which was still a thing at that times) those failing belts got replaced without any costs for the customer. That's why you find not many Pfaffs with that belt even though it was used. Other companys sadly failed a similar programm. 


The Adler-belt from the french link doesn't work. A friend of mine tried that with her machine. A few years ago there was a guy who produced a batch of new belt with the old molds. But he stopped in 2018 (?) and the molds where destroyed - for whatever reason. My friend (with some help from other SMfanatics) ended up dissassembling her machine and customizing the upper and the lower gear with a fitting belt. And after that reassembling and retiming the machine without any manual. That was one hell of a job. It wasn't perfect in the end but the machine still works. 


However, there is a swiss company that claims to still selling fitting belts for Turissa. 

https://www.btrade.ch/Zahnriemen-und-Gurte 

If all else is failing for you on your side of the pond, you might take a look there. 

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