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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'm working on the arm shaft clutch assembly on two 101 machines, a 1924, and a 1929 I just got a couple of days ago.

The only Adjusters Manual I have is from 1923, and although it does show an exploded view of the arm shaft bushing and the various parts that slide onto it, it fails to show the inboard side of the arm shaft gear, or mention the Arm Shaft Gear Spring (1927 Parts list #66713, Plate 9152) that is attached there. It also does not show the gear clutch collar (Part# 66711) that slides onto the bushing before the gear with an extended pin that fits into the loop on the end of the Gear Spring.

Is there a later edition of the Adjusters manual that shows or at least mentions these parts?
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #2 
Everyone was pretty excited when I got the Smithsonian to send me a complete copy of the 1923 adjusters manual last year (likely the one you have), so I don't think there are any later ones readily available.

paul

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mtboze

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Paul,

I'm pretty sure you're right. I got mine from Smithsonian just about a month ago.


-Ron

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #4 


Do you have the whole thing? For a while, at least, the copy
on their site was only about 20 pages long. The complete one is also only about 20 pdf pages long, but each pdf page has two original pages.

paul

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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #5 
Paul,

It is 20 PDF pages, plus a page of copyright information at the beginning, and was an 8.5 MB download. It certainly appears to be complete, and even has some information at the end specific to the 101-1 and 101-10 models. After finding a reference to this manual online, I followed links to the National Museum of American History Library, got a phone number, and spoke with a technician. She actually searched a couple of different repositories, including the one on trade publications, for related materials, but only found this item available. She then sent me the download link.

-Ron
Screen Shot 2020-01-12 at 9.48.34 AM.png 

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
Great -- that's what I have too.  And I had to go through the same process.  Did yours come with a "Only share this with your colleagues" admonishment?  They were worried about copyright, since it's on the cusp of the age where a bunch of new stuff became public domain this year.

paul

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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #7 
Here's what preceded the manual:

Screen Shot 2020-01-12 at 10.13.17 AM.png 

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #8 
Isn't it amazing how sewing machine corporations keep copyright on manuals that are for machines long, long out of production? It's like we should scrap these old cast iron beauties and buy their plastic crap. Unreal. No, maybe just unethical. 

- Bruce
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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #9 
It would seem to me that resource materials like this would at least be made readily available to bona fide professional repairmen. I can't see how their work would measurably affect sales of new machines and cut into the company's profits. The only remaining question would be how a hobbyist, who might to a little "professional" repair work on the side, could qualify for obtaining the materials. But, since the company has probably forgotten that they ever made these legacy machines, i guess they just don't see any profit in supporting them or those who own them, and effectively just don't care.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #10 
@mtboze -- My copy has the same disclaimer on the front.

@JonesHand52 -- I don't think the issue here is with Singer.  I suspect Singer has long since stopped caring about copyrights on defunct machine manuals.  The issue is with the Smithsonian wanting to be absolutely sure they adhere to copyright law.  Sometime in 2019, works published in 1923 entered the public domain, and I suspect the folks giving out copies were just being mindful of that.  Now that it's 2020, I have no qualms about publishing the adjusters' manual.

http://www.foxharp.boston.ma.us/tmp/z/Singer_Adjusters_Manual_101_Class.pdf

paul

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