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pgf

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Reply with quote  #1 
Anyone dismantled an American lately?  I'm a little stumped by the needle bar.  For some reason they didn't use a screw to attach the piece that drives the bar up and down -- it seems to be a pin that should be driven out.  But I'm not happy with that idea at all.  I gave it a couple of tentative taps, from both sides, but no budge.  The pin is tight to the ball-shaped piece, and loose to the needle bar itself.

Of course I can clean it without removing it, but it's easier and a better job gets done if it's all apart...

abho_nb1.jpg abho_nb2.jpg


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Chillin in NC

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Reply with quote  #2 
Paul,I've never had the pleasure of disassembling an American. Looking at your pics it looks like it's staked in there. You could drill it out. I'd clean around it tho.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #3 
I'm definitely not drilling!  :-)
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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
I'm definitely not drilling!  :-)


I'm with you there sir!
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #5 
No hammer! ☺ Make a press. Here is one way, similar, but opposite of a puller. Use it to replace pin too.

Bottom picture is special adjusters tool. Similar tool for roll pins may work. https://www.jbtools.com/e-z-red-ppt13-roll-pin-punch-tool/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIqfm-k5HI6gIViq_ICh0LUQUuEAQYAyABEgJrKvD_BwE

Attached Images
jpeg 20200712_105303.jpg (190.43 KB, 7 views)
jpeg 20200712_111156.jpg (68.94 KB, 5 views)


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Dave in middle TN

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks Dave, for stating what should have been obvious.  Doh!  I even have a press, unused for many years now, that's likely the right size -- it's a pin press for continuous motorcycle chains.  I'll take a look at using that, and then probably decide to clean the needle bar in place anyway.  :-)
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #7 
It took me more time to find and choose between my two pin presses than it did to remove the pin.  Thanks again Dave.

abho_pressedpin.jpg 


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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #8 
Great! We need more pictures of machine, it sparked my interest in few bits shown.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #9 
Ah -- good point.  There were a couple in the "Today's adventure" thread, but easier just to point you to my blog entry for that machine:

https://projects.foxharp.net/sewing_machines/#c1872-american-b-h-o-sewing-machine-co-model-m

It's definitely a neat machine.  Some of the early ones could be converted between a normal lockstitch ("normal", except for the shuttle contains a round bobbin and swings in a short vertical arc!), and an edge stitch for button-holing and overseaming.  I've read that there's only one example of those left, in a museum somewhere, but have no more details.  Apparently the conversion wasn't trivial, and at least for the domestic machines they dropped the flexibility.  Even so, that shuttle mechanism yields an incredibly dense and complicated under-throat-plate area.  The company didn't last long -- their machines couldn't have been all that cost-effective to produce.

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #10 
I should have given this thread a slightly more generic name, but if anyone is searching for information on the American Button-Hole, Overseaming & Sewing Machine Co., they'll probably find this thread

I did some research on the patents listed on my machine's medallion, as well as the additional ones listed on a later machine.

Quote:

Nov 12, 1850 -- US7776   --  Allan Wilson's VS patent
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US7776
Jul 26, 1859 -- US24863  -- E.A. Goodes and E.L. Miller two needle chain stitch
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US24863
Oct 13, 1863 -- US40311  -- G. Rehfuss, different buttonhole stitch?
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US40311
Feb 9,  1864 -- USRE1616 -- reissue of US24863
    https://patents.google.com/patent/USRE1616
Aug 2,  1864 -- US43743  -- G. Rehfuss, machine convertible from button-holing (US40311) to lockstitch
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US43743
May 23, 1865 -- US47905  -- G. Rehfuss, mechanisms for forming stitches on the edges of fabrics
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US47905
Nov 21, 1865 -- US51086  -- G. Rehfuss, machine convertible from buttonholing
        to lockstitch
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US51086
Feb 27, 1866 -- US52932  -- G. Rehfuss, better feed adjuster
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US52932
Jan 8,  1867 -- US61101  -- G. Rehfuss, "truck" feed for moving heavy fabric
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US61101
Jan 8,  1867 -- US61102  -- G. Rehfuss, binding stitch, tension mechanism
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US61102
Jan 7,  1868 -- ???   not sure -- several possibly applicable:
    https://patents.google.com/?q=sewing+machine&before=priority:18680109&after=priority:18680107
Jul 21, 1868 -- US80090  -- G. Rehfuss, hemmer
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US80090
Jun 15, 1869 -- US91484  -- G. Rehfuss, round bobbin plate and latch
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US91484
May 3,  1870 -- US102710 -- G. Rehfuss, variable width feed, and shuttle tension improvement
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US102710
Apr 25, 1871 -- US114197 -- G. Rehfuss, segmented shuttle race, so it can be moved out of the way for B-H or O
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US114197
Dec 12, 1871 -- US121896 -- G. Rehfuss, improvements in easy conversion from B-H/O to lockstictch
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US121896


More patents listed on a machine later than mine:

Nov 26, 1872 -- US133487 -- G. Rehfuss, drop-leaf support which locks in both up and down positions
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US133487
Jan 28, 1873 -- USD6375  -- G. Rehfuss, design patent for curved arm machines.
    https://patents.google.com/patent/USD6375
Jan 28, 1873 -- USRE5260E -- G. Rehfuss, reissue of US51086
    https://patents.google.com/patent/USRE5260E
Mar 18, 1873 -- US137028 -- G. Rehfuss, lever for locking shuttle in place  (My machine actually has this feature)
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US137028
May 27, 1873 -- US139421 -- G. Rehfuss, improved shuttle threading and tension
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US139421


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pgf

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Reply with quote  #11 
Well, I was distracted for a while doing some shellac stripping on the drawers and top pieces of my #42 cabinet out in the garage, but when it came time to start doing the veneer repair on the main cabinet, which is a cellar job, I realized the workbench was occupied, and I had to come back to this machine to finish it up.

So I got the American apart as far as I could (I actually don't know how it would come apart, even if I could get the hand wheel off, which I can't, not without a custom puller), cleaned it and polished it a bit, and got it back together without much fuss.  I did break the takeup return spring, but managed to undo a coil and a half and bend it a new hook.  Works fine.

I had grand visions of making a display base somewhat like a mini treadle top, to properly show how the hand wheel would have been partially "submerged" in the table, but in the end I decided to try the board-and-dowel approach that I saw macybaby has been using.  It worked well.

I've included a couple of "before" pictures, just because.

Oh -- and two disclaimers:  the liquid shine is from a very recent waxing, and I have to say, the Google Photos automatic photo enhancer does a fantastic job of fixing lighting and contrast.  Those cloth plate decorations don't pop out nearly as much in real life.  (I'm sad to say.  ;-) )

paul
american_02.jpg american_06.jpg 
american_20.jpg american_22.jpg american_23.jpg american_27.jpg


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Cecilia

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
Well, I was distracted for a while doing some shellac stripping on the drawers and top pieces of my #42 cabinet out in the garage, but when it came time to start doing the veneer repair on the main cabinet, which is a cellar job, I realized the workbench was occupied, and I had to come back to this machine to finish it up.

So I got the American apart as far as I could (I actually don't know how it would come apart, even if I could get the hand wheel off, which I can't, not without a custom puller), cleaned it and polished it a bit, and got it back together without much fuss.  I did break the takeup return spring, but managed to undo a coil and a half and bend it a new hook.  Works fine.

I had grand visions of making a display base somewhat like a mini treadle top, to properly show how the hand wheel would have been partially "submerged" in the table, but in the end I decided to try the board-and-dowel approach that I saw macybaby has been using.  It worked well.

I've included a couple of "before" pictures, just because.

Oh -- and two disclaimers:  the liquid shine is from a very recent waxing, and I have to say, the Google Photos automatic photo enhancer does a fantastic job of fixing lighting and contrast.  Those cloth plate decorations don't pop out nearly as much in real life.  (I'm sad to say.  ;-) )

paul
american_02.jpg american_06.jpg 
american_20.jpg american_22.jpg american_23.jpg american_27.jpg


That is unbelievable. What a great job!!!

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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #13 
Paul - the history on this machine is quite intriguing and one I was not knowledgeable - so thanks for sharing.  It's such a special one for your collection and I love Macybaby's display idea as well.  Your work on the metal bits is unbelievable, an amazing transformation!
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #14 
Hah!   Chaly -- The metal bits are easy, as I'm sure you well know.  What's really hard are the painted bits.  As you also well know, and I may never find out.  :-)

paul

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Chillin in NC

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Reply with quote  #15 
Paul, you've got that ABH standing tall!  And the stand does the trick! 

Dan
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Chaly

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf
Hah!   Chaly -- The metal bits are easy, as I'm sure you well know.  What's really hard are the painted bits.  As you also well know, and I may never find out.  :-)

paul


And, Paul - you should really find out![smile]
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