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seb58

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Hello!

I have recently acquired a very nice 1905 Singer 28K in mint condition, hardly used I think. 
It came in a cabinet that is obviously later than 1905 (art deco period I think). It is not a Singer cabinet and as a consequence, the belt comes up at an angle which makes it rub against the bobbin winder wheel and it grates the belt...
So, I was thinking of converting it into a hand-crank. Problem is, the balance wheel is a 12 spokes one and it is much larger than the other balance wheels and I am not sure a hand crank will fit...
What do you think? Has anyone tried a hand crank with such a wheel? I wouldn't like to buy one and not be able to use it [wink]


One other question: the plates have lost their nickel coating and are rough steel... Is there any home method to polish them nicely?
IMG_20191007_190535_resized_20191012_123003361.jpg  IMG_20191007_190546_resized_20191012_123002653.jpg  MmsCamera_2019-10-11-17-02-41.jpg  MmsCamera_2019-10-11-17-01-36.jpg

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OurWorkbench

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How beautiful! I have never seen a 3/4 treadle in real life, let alone one in a parlor cabinet. It sure has nice Scroll & Roses Decals http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_machine_company/decals/domestics/scrolls_roses2.html

I looked through some of my files and it looks like that was the bobbin winder for a hand crank machine. I think I would try to find a bobbin winder for the treadle as that is such a unique (dare I say rare? lol) cabinet.

On my 66 machine, I put a reproduction hand crank on. The width of the part that goes in between the spokes is approximately 19mm (3/4"). It is about 16mm (5/8") above the stop motion clutch wheel.

http://needlebar.org/manuals/Singer28.pdf is from 1903 but looks to be American 28.


Janey


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seb58

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Thanks Janey!

I'm surprised to read that you have never seen a 3/4 treadle in real life! They are really common here! on the last picture you can even see the tail of my 1920 128K treadle on its original table.
here is another picture if you want... I think 3/4 size machines were more marketed as budget machines (smaller = less expensive?) than portables here. There are not so many listings for hand-cranks around here.

IMG_20191012_165356_resized_20191012_045800912.jpg 

As for this cabinet, I really think it is a generic cabinet bought later either to replace a damaged treadle table or to upgrade the looks of the machine. 
The inside is quite bare.

IMG_20191012_164650_resized_20191012_045801479.jpg 
Regarding the bobbin winder, I have seen such machines with such a bobbin winder on a treadle and they work. I tried the 28K on the 128K table and the belt doesn't rub against the bobbin winder wheel; the belt "plunges" vertically from the balance wheel, whereas on this cabinet, it is at an angle.

Here are two pictures from two different listings of the same 28K with the same bobbin winder and we can see that the belt is out of the bobbin winder's way [wink]

IMG_20191012_164650_resized_20191012_045801479.jpg 
IMG_20191012_164650_resized_20191012_045801479.jpg 

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks for the feed back.  I've heard that hand cranks were probably more popular in England.

It is neat to see, even if just on screen the 3/4 treadles.

Janey


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seb58

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Reply with quote  #5 
[wink]

Just another question... None of the (visible) parts on this machine except the bobbin case are stamped; no SIMANCO, no parts number... Is that common?
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OurWorkbench

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It seems to me that on some of the early 1900s machine parts are missing numbers.  I have tried to come closer to finding out variety of machine by part numbers.  That has been unsuccessful as either parts were missing numbers or there were different part numbers than should have been based on other part numbers.  

It seems like Singer would change the numbers, just because.  Sometimes it was for the same part, but just had a different number.  

Janey

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seb58

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks for the information. 😉
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vichou007

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by seb58
Hello!

I have recently acquired a very nice 1905 Singer 28K in mint condition, hardly used I think. 
It came in a cabinet that is obviously later than 1905 (art deco period I think). It is not a Singer cabinet and as a consequence, the belt comes up at an angle which makes it rub against the bobbin winder wheel and it grates the belt...
So, I was thinking of converting it into a hand-crank. Problem is, the balance wheel is a 12 spokes one and it is much larger than the other balance wheels and I am not sure a hand crank will fit...
What do you think? Has anyone tried a hand crank with such a wheel? I wouldn't like to buy one and not be able to use it [wink]


One other question: the plates have lost their nickel coating and are rough steel... Is there any home method to polish them nicely?
IMG_20191007_190535_resized_20191012_123003361.jpg  IMG_20191007_190546_resized_20191012_123002653.jpg  MmsCamera_2019-10-11-17-02-41.jpg  MmsCamera_2019-10-11-17-01-36.jpg
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vichou007

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Reply with quote  #9 
You are absolutely correct. That is a beautiful machine in a lovely cabinet, but I don't believe it's a Singer cabinet. You shouldn't have a problem attaching a hand crank, unless there's no motor boss. There's no right side view in any of these pictures, so I can't see if there is one. Is there?
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seb58

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Reply with quote  #10 
There is one, funny thing there is a sort of "lid" screwed up on it. 

IMG_20191019_224630_resized_20191019_104833180.jpg  IMG_20191019_224713_resized_20191019_104833844.jpg 
One drawback about this cabinet is that there is not oil drip pan underneath the machine; not only you risk getting your feet messy while sewing but the cabinet works as a sort of echo chamber and it makes the machine quite loud -much louder than the 128K on its treadle table...

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vichou007

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by seb58
There is one, funny thing there is a sort of "lid" screwed up on it. 

IMG_20191019_224630_resized_20191019_104833180.jpg  IMG_20191019_224713_resized_20191019_104833844.jpg 
One drawback about this cabinet is that there is not oil drip pan underneath the machine; not only you risk getting your feet messy while sewing but the cabinet works as a sort of echo chamber and it makes the machine quite loud -much louder than the 128K on its treadle table...
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vichou007

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Reply with quote  #12 
I was lucky to find a 3/4 size treadle not far from me (I'm in DC). They certainly aren't common in the states at all! I just threw one of my 128's in it for size, but it's not going to stay. Have to decide which machine gets it!

Attached Images
jpeg 20190930_021055.jpg (329.04 KB, 2 views)

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seb58

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Reply with quote  #13 
Great find!! congratulations! You must show us when it has its definite machine in it 😉

The only treadle table I own is the 3/4 for my 128K and I was wondering if the irons are smaller than the full size tradle tables or if it is just the cut in the table top that is smaller...
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vichou007

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Reply with quote  #14 
I have a crinkle finish blackside 99 that I may put in it. I have much prettier machines that are hand cranks, but I want to leave them original, although I have seen hand crank machines in treadles!
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