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khogue

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello all, I haven't had many sewing machine adventures since the big wedding quilt project was done as I was "sew-ed" out and have been spending my time knitting. 

However I did pick up a little 99 awhile back, it was the machine only.

The sewing machine store near me had a full size flatbed style plastic case for almost $50 that doesn't even look as good as the $20 something generic carry case found at WalMart. The pins on the new flatbed case wouldn't line up with the holes on the 99 anyway.

I don't have high expectations finding an older portable case for it and wondered if anyone has modified a modern plastic case to hold a 3/4 size sewing machine.  

Any ideas appreciated!  


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KarenH in OK

Singers  66, 192, 201, 221, 306 
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #2 
eBay. There are cases of all sorts there from time-to-time, plus a couple who make them from scratch.
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #3 
There is a plastic case for 3/4 flat bed machines. I found it rather interesting that they included the full size 66 as fitting. It might, as it looks like there are dividers that MIGHT be removable. One of the below links does not show the insides and is more expensive.

https://www.sewingpartsonline.com/portable-case-singer-p60218.aspx
https://www.allbrands.com/products/7414-p60218-portable-hard-carrying-case-for-12-5-lx6-25#tab_product_description
https://www.amazon.com/Generic-Plastic-Sewing-Machine-White/dp/B008MM5O22

Janey

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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #4 
Here 99s in suite cases where one of the sides come off turn up now and then, often in black or grayish I think.  The most common seem to be a two toned cream/burgundy case with a top that comes off (secured with clips on the side). I think a 99 should fit in to the 185 cases, the UK made 185Ks with wooden base are quite good (hinged extention board and the top has slightly tapered sides). These cases tend to come with machines in  pretty good condition, some I have seen had hardly traces of use at all. I don't know how often they turn up in your area, but around me they seem to pop up on a regular basis. I guess a bargain 99 with the right type of case is easier to come by.

If someone in your family dabbles in carpentry or happily work with wood in general, a base can be made for the 99 and perhaps a ply wood case with hinged side like the old suite case type Singer portables. It can be lined and upholstered in suitable pvc coated fabrics. If you are willing to spend a bit of money on it, you can contact Helen Howes in the UK, she probably has them, the only prohibitive factor is postage and packing costs.

I'm just thinking out loud really ;- ), I have had similar projects.
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Zorba

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Reply with quote  #5 
Bases are quite easy to make for that matter...
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khogue

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Reply with quote  #6 
Zorba making a base may be the easiest/less costly way to handle using and storing this machine. 

I do have a full size flat bed case, its right side pin is a bit wonky and has a habit of falling out.  I'm trying to decide if it would be possible to drill another pin hole to line up with the 99.  My local machine buddy seems to think it might eventually cause the plastic to crack/fail. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorba
Bases are quite easy to make for that matter...

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KarenH in OK

Singers  66, 192, 201, 221, 306 
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Mickey

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Reply with quote  #7 
It's not ideal to fit a 99 to a full size case, a sort of refitting would require more than a bit of work. It's easier to repair the damage and keep a 66 there, find a 3/4 size base to work with in stead. It's hard to make them as nice as the old ones. If you are lucky, it's only a grub screw missing or in need of tightening.
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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #8 
If you're going to use it for a traveling machine build or buy a base for it and use one of those "suitcase on wheels" setups (proper term?) to haul it around.  That or make your own travel bag for it.
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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hello, 

  Recently we restored a wooden case for a Wheeler and Wilson no 8 hand crank.  The bottom split and was not reliable.  What we did was to put 10oz fiberglass cloth with epoxy resin and hide it with very thin plywood across the entire base/bottom out of site.  It is way stronger than any original and looks as good or better than when received while essentially being invisible for the repair.  I've not had to do this with a bentwood case yet but lay up epoxy really sticks well (unlike polyester resin which will delaminate) and if done on the inside can really strengthen the old wood.  I still have a phobia about picking up old cases by the handle but have tried from low heights of only a few inches and it holds up.  I just pick it up from the bottom all the time anyways but the case needed to be rebuilt either way.  

Best regards,
Mike

edited to add we did use some black synthetic felt on the bottom to help hide things.
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GuidCA

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ke6cvh
Hello, 

  Recently we restored a wooden case for a Wheeler and Wilson no 8 hand crank.  The bottom split and was not reliable.  What we did was to put 10oz fiberglass cloth with epoxy resin and hide it with very thin plywood across the entire base/bottom out of site.  It is way stronger than any original and looks as good or better than when received while essentially being invisible for the repair.
............... 

Mike - can you share where you got the fiberglass, and what type/brand epoxy you used? That repair sounds great. I repaired a yakima rooftop box that a neighbor wracked into a parking structure and gave away. I used fiberglass drywall tape and ABS cement, but the box was ABS so couldn't use that repair on wood. 

Thanks,
Brian

edited to add we did use some black synthetic felt on the bottom to help hide things.

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ke6cvh

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Brian, 

  I just used generic 10 oz cloth (not chopped strand mat but we do use that for some stuff also).  I'm in the Philippines so brands here don't mean much to you.  We get a grey two part marine epoxy at the local Ace hardware made in this country.  This is a 1 to 1 mix and comes in two separate 1 gallon cans.  It goes a really really long way.  We mix coloring that is supposed to be for polyester resin in it and no problems.  So far we make a brown and then also take a purple but when mixed with the grey makes a sky blue.  We also take colored sand from a local book store hobby section and will mix that in for effects of areas that are bordered by stainless rod.  For the lay up resin I can get a yellow type that is lower cost but same mix ratio as the clear we can get from same place.  Typically if it is a layup epoxy it will be a 2 to 1 mix.  I've built strip built kayaks using layup resin bought off eBay and shipped to an FPO address in Japan arriving at a ship (no joke) but used wood from USA and that saved me when I shipped it back to USA as I had the receipts for the wood to show to the customs folks otherwise it wouldn't have been allowed.  There is a company called Gougen Brothers that makes West Systems epoxy which is really good stuff.  You can call their customer service or just browse their web page and get the same results.  If I was in USA I'd likely be buying 2:1 mix layup epoxy resin off eBay and just using that.  All can be bought on line.  Mix ratio is critical as is curing temp.  It is unlike polyester resin (which we buy in metal 5 gallon tins sometimes three tins at a time) in that polyester can be mixed hot and just cooks off sooner.  Epoxy resin mix ratio is critical to proper curing.  Also, outdoors is a must. Skin and worse lungs can become permanently sensitized to it.  A respirator and nitrile/butyl rubber gloves keep any of that from being a problem.  We use fiberglass allot here to make and repair all sorts of things on a regular basis.  We used boat building techniques when we built the tree house so marine ply flooring is 100 percent encapsulated in it including the holes drilled through epoxy sections for the bolts.  

Best regards,
Mike

Edited to add....if using epoxy it must be protected by UV.  In boat building this is done with spar varnish but it could just as easily be coloring additive also or paint.  Also the coloring that works in the polyester lay up resin and the 2 part grey marine epoxy will not work with the lay up epoxy.  I've mixed asphaltum and carbon in for coloring.  The powdered stuff will never mix but when melting the asphaltum I can buy by the kilo it mixes perfect with spar or polyurethane varnish using a heat gun to melt it.
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