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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #1 
My 1924 101-10 came in a Singer Bentwood case, but it was clearly not original to the machine. It basically fits, in that the lid can be closed and latched, but with the machine attached to the case hinges, the right-hand edge of the machine binds against the edge of the opening. More importantly the gear cluster access under the hook and bobbin case is 1/4" - 3/8" too tall, and a previous owner cut a ragged hole to allow it to extend down below the floor of the case to accommodate it.

ISMACS describes the 101-10 as being an aluminum portable machine, but unlike with cabinets for the 101, there is no indication of what model portable case may have been mated with this machine. 

Since my machine doesn't fit readily in a basic, full-size Singer portable case, was there a special case just for the 101?
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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #2 
According to a 101-4_12 manual, the bentwood case for the 101 would have had a knee lever.  I don't think the one for the 99-13 would work, though!

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #3 
Not all bases are created equal. In addition to some being longer/wider to accommodate different machines, some are also have a taller height to accommodate different machines.

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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #4 
The Singer 101 had a couple of portable cases and bases. The plugs were top mounted in one design with a thin cover over them rounded on the ends, or for attachments. There was a knee lever model for sure. Photos of them are hard to find.  Color photos are from the internet. - Bruce 101-11.jpg  Vintage-Working-Singer-101-4-portable-sewing-machine-with.jpg  Vintage-Working-Singer-101-4-portable-sewing-machine-with-_57.jpg  49.png 
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #5 
I just love that early electric machines were marketed (and sold!) as connecting to a light socket for electricity.  I have a similar picture for my Western Electric No. 2, of the machine's wire snaking up to a wall sconce.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #6 
@pgf - I have a couple of sets of cord plugs that include a light socket adapter for the male plug just for this reason. Many homes were wired for electric lights in the 1910s and early 1920s that didn't have wall plugs because there were so few electric appliances in the average home. Quite a few had wall-mounted wires and conduits for only a single bulb. Treadles and hand cranks started disappearing as soon as electrification became more common. My father in law (now 90, born in 1929)) told me he remembers when as a boy his mother was bugging his father to get her an electric machine. Their house was fairly recently electrified; they lived on the edge of town. 

One of my sets is going to be part of the re-wiring job for my 1917 Western Electric rotary portable sewing machine with the big Western Electric motor that mounts on the back and swings under the arm for storage when not in use. 

-Bruce Western Electric ad c.1918.jpg 

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #7 
Yes, that's the Western Electric picture I was referring to.
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Ana's Dad

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Reply with quote  #8 
The evolution of the portable wooden cases for 101s is fascinating. My manual for the 101-2 from 1923 only has the library table cabinet version and suggests it be plugged into the "nearest electric light socket". The manual I have for the 101-3 and -11 shows the connector on the upper right hand side of the top as in Bruce's example and instructs the reader to attach the plug to the "nearest electric socket". The green book for the 101-4 and -12 from 1929 shows the connection on the outer right side of the case of the portable version and for the first time mentions a three rather than the former two pin terminal. My 1925 cabinet model has a very long cord likely to accommodate plugging into a light socket.

My 101 aluminum portable from 1923 appears to be in its original Singer bentwood case. This case is longer than a three quarter but shorter than a standard Singer bentwood and the base a bit deeper. Its two pin connector is on the back of the machine rather than the top or side and it has a tiny lidded case likely for bobbins on the top to the right of the balance wheel. It has the motor controller built into the back of the machine and uses the knee lever which is round rather than flat as in later Singer models.

Sorry the pictures aren't so great.

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