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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have just about finished the servicing of the 1924 101 I acquired recently. I’’m having trouble though with the clutch, and I’m finding that the Adjuster’s Manual is creating some confusion.

I’m trying to access the inner clutch mechanism. After removing the balance wheel and the bobbin winder assembly, the manual says to simlply “withdraw” the bushing. The bushing rotates freely on the shaft, but won’t slide out.

After removing the collar set screws, the collar and the Gear clutch rotate and slide on the bushing OK, but there is a round device on the inner end of the bushing, that is not shown in the Manual illustration, and I can see no way to remove it to enable the bushing to be removed from the machine, and enable the clutch to be accessed.

The illustration in the Manual also shows a washer in the outer side of the Gear Clutch that I do not have on my machine. It appears that the round piece that I have on the inner side of my Clutch likely serves the same purpose as the washer, but the big question is still how to remove this assembly for the machine.

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #2 
Unless I am missing the point, it looks like that black part on the outside is part of that end component which hold it in place.

101- clutch.jpg 



101- clutch 2.jpg 


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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #3 
From the way the inner part is machined, it isclear that it is not part of the aluminum body casting. But, I cannot see any screws or other device to free it from the casting. And, I cannot see any obvious point from which to break loose a pressed-in fit, if it is indeed designed to be removed.

The beaded edge that is exposed on the outside of the body casting doesn't provide a surface to get a grip on for twisting, prying or pulling without damage. This would only leave tapping on the the inner surface, which I'm reluctant to try unless there is no alternative.

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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #4 
I searched the parts list and did indeed find what is called the “Arm Shaft (horizontal) Flanged Bushing (Back) for 101-2 and 101-3 machines”. However, I still have no clue as to how to get this part off the machine, short of taking a hammer to it, in which case this machine will become a door stop or paperweight.

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #5 
that lip looks like it would accommodate a three jaw puller.
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #6 
The screws that held the bobbin winder, hold the end bushing, but those are out? I have had 3, 101s apart for service, my finger nails pulled them out.

I have had problems getting sleeve G2, that slides over main shaft loose. It took about 3 days of tri-flow oil to loosen dried 3in1 oil residue. Two machines were locked. It is easy to check, stop motion feature will not work.

A wooden block, or dowel as drift, and small hammer, to tap exposed bushing circumference away from machine. There may be dried oil holding in place.

Other possibility is heat gun to carefully warm end of machine, then freeze spray bushing. Aluminum conducts heat quickly, but it also expands with heat. Idea is to have bushing cooler than machine, and pull bushing.

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KenG

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
that lip looks like it would accommodate a three jaw puller.


It does simply slide out. Mine was "glued" in by old varnished oil deposits. I used a wooden dowel placed on the inside surface which I then tapped with a small tack hammer to break it free. Once I got out and cleaned up it goes in and out easily.
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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #8 
I appreciate the shared experiences. Just having confirmation that this bushing should come out is incredibly helpful. After just a relatively short exposure to Liquid Wrench, I was able to get the bushing out 1/8 inch or so. I'll leave it overnight and hope for success tomorrow.

Now that I think if it, I had similar difficulty getting the motor out. I wonder if it is "galvanic corrosion" from steel against aluminum.


Thanks for the help!
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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #9 
Well, this story has come to its final chapter. After successfully removing the horizontal arm shaft bushing and related parts, I have found a broken gear spring (#66713), the one that is inset in the gear that is driven by the motor. I had hoped to find the source of a problem, but never even considered that it might be an irreplaceable part. 

But, if nothing else, I now have a pocket full of experience with the Singer 101, that I will hopefully never have to utilize again in the future.

Thanks, again, for all the help!
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #10 
All Springs are replaceable.
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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #11 
Excuse my frustration, what I intended to express was the unlikelihood of finding such a spring. In my less than a year of giving these forgotten relics a new life, I have so far only encountered one “broken“ machine, a 15-91 with motor that required replacement. Its ”donor” now sits like a trophy in my wife’s sewing room, waiting for an appropriately-priced parts machine to make itself known. Here in rural Montana it’s rare that i find any machines that don’t come with a significant shipping charge, or traveling cost. Working on my limited budget, coupled with relative scarcity of 101’s, pretty much ensures this one won’t see another stitch.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #12 
Springs can be made at home. Source material should be cheap to ship.
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtboze
Well, this story has come to its final chapter. After successfully removing the horizontal arm shaft bushing and related parts, I have found a broken gear spring (#66713), the one that is inset in the gear that is driven by the motor. I had hoped to find the source of a problem, but never even considered that it might be an irreplaceable part. 


I can't find that part in the 1921 parts manual -- which "plate" (figure) is it on?  Do you have a picture?

paul

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Jim/Steelsewing

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Reply with quote  #14 
If worse has come to worse, I still have a 1924 101 head downstairs that "could" be saved, but it would take an insane amount of work... and even then, I'm not so sure... maybe it has the spring you need. That would at least give it a purpose for taking up space under my bench! I will need to see a picture of said spring and it's location. The 15-91 motor is another matter entirely. I might have to make a phone call for one of those. Do let me know. It's not a problem. Happy too help.
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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #15 
Paul,

It's Plate #9152, in the 1927 Parts List for 101-2, 101-3, 101-10, 101-11.

Screen Shot 2020-01-08 at 9.04.18 AM.png 

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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #16 
Jim,

I might just take you up on that space-taker under your bench. You should have seen the Parts diagram of the spring by now. Mine looks just like that, but is in two pieces. It was in a recess in the side of the gear. There is a pin coming off the side of the piece next to it that engaged the hole in the spring.

As far as the 15-91 motor, I've bid on a "for parts or repair" auction on Goodwill that has a couple of days to go, I need to see how that works out.

IMG_2641.jpeg 

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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #17 
Re-reading through the previous posts, I've found myself kind of intrigued by the idea of making a spring. That's something I've never considered doing before. I always assumed that there was not only special wire needed, but also magical, blacksmith stuff like heat-treating, and oil quenching. I just watch a couple of online DIY videos, and I think I may give it a try. Who knows when I may wind up with another broken spring?
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pgf

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Reply with quote  #18 
Go for it!   That spring, especially, looks easily craftable.  I've been intimidated by the "magic" part in the past as well, and have only made or repaired a couple of simple springs which I was able to do with materials and tools I had on hand.  I'm sure someone here can suggest what wire you might start with -- that spring's form is simple, but it is part of the drivetrain (as opposed to, say, the tensioner or the bobbin winder, which would be far less critical).

paul

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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #19 

Apparently (and I hope others will correctly me if I'm wrong), music wire, like guitar or piano strings, has just the right properties: tensile strength, ductility, and flexibility, to allow it to be formed into simple springs without having to deal with all those metallurgic processes.

I'm pretty sure there's a limit on durability or strength for any spring I could make, but I would imagine that in this application a handmade spring might serve well.
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #20 
Yes. Do a search here for music wire, and the results will yield how members here have used it.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #21 
I make springs like this all the time from the music wire I get from our local hobby shop. It's sold in various sizes in 3 foot lengths for making push rods, landing gear and various other parts for RC model aircraft. Wire bending tools are nice to have, which I do, and the wire is good quality for most all applications. This looks fairly thick, so you may need to heat and anneal the end to form the loop, which is not a problem. Use a vice grip or something similar on the other side of the loop as a heat sink. They sell the wire from really small to quite heavy sizes. 



- Bruce
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russojgr

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Reply with quote  #22 
If you know anyone with a micrometer, you should measure the wire diameter to determine the right wire size. Then try and put your broken spring together on a piece of paper and try and get a measurement of the diameter of the spring. You may be able to get a plastic pipe or wooden dowel of the right diameter to wind it around. The spring is a simple shape and you should be able to make this one yourself. You could look at jewelry pliers to help with the bending. Keep us posted with your progress. A very interesting topic.
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JonesHand52

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Reply with quote  #23 
You can take a piece of the broken spring with you to a hobby shop and buy the music wire which comes in a 3 foot length and match it by eye. When bending the coil, a bolt will do for a mandrel. You will find that there will be some "spring back" and will need a smaller size mandrel than the finished loop. 

Spring back and coil tightening is the concept in the hand crank mechanisms for the old portable 78 rpm phonographs. There is a coil spring that screws by one end to the bed of the portable box. The hand crank goes into a hole in an escutcheon on the front or side of the box through this coil and bayonets or screws into the winding mechanism for the motor spring. At rest, the winding handle will slide past the inner part of the coil for insertion and winding, but when the handle is released under motor spring pressure, the handle will fly around in a circle, so the coil is made tight enough that when the spring pressure wants to throw the handle backwards, the coil tightens and grips the handle. Then the motor will run and play the record. Motor and playing speed is controlled by rotating weights and springs called a governor. There is a flange on the governor that contacts a stop with a leather or felt pad that sets the speed the governor can rotate at thus controlling motor speed as it unwinds. 

And you thought sewing machines were complicated! I have a nice little collection of 78 and cylinder phonographs too. 

-Bruce
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #24 
I measured spring diameter of 0.050". Mine was broke in same spot. I have replaced in 2 out of 3 machines.

When making them, small loop for pin bent first using round nose jewelry pliers. Large loop with fingers, smooth pliers for last bends. I suggest this order to start making, and checking with original. Last bend can be marked with sharpie, final length cut and and finished.

Bought wire at Hobby Lobby or local hobby shop.

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Dave in middle TN

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #25 
What's the symptom when this spring is broken?

paul

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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #26 
In my case, the balance wheel could easily be turned n both directions. In fact, I came across a 1929 101 just a few days ago, bought it, and it has the same problem. I confirmed it also has a broken spring the next day, so now I need to replace two springs, although there is a possibility that there may be one original spring available, but I haven't heard yet.

I found some .047 music wire on Amazon (that's what my spring mic'd at), and it's on it's way. At little off-topic, but the #40 cabinet that came with the most recent 101 was missing the spring for the lid support arm, so I have wire coming for that as well.

Even with knowing the work ahead of me with this machine and cabinet, I have no regrets on the purchase. The machine was owned by a local small-shop seamstress who passed away some time ago, and has seen a lot of fabric pass under the foot, as evidenced by the almost complete lack of decals on the cloth plate while the rest of the machine looks really nice, if not really shiny.

The stop motion screw washers were out of order, and the oil reservoir basin didn't look like it had seen oil in a very long time, but the machine ran smoothly, and there was not much lint build up anywhere.

The cabinet has no veneer lifting or chipping, but the finish, well, the finish needs work. But the cabinet is sturdy, and except for the missing spring, from my perspective is really nice with lots of potential.

So, all in all, I'm a pretty happy guy, and I'm thankful for all the VSS information and encouragement. 
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Kitcarlson

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Reply with quote  #27 
When motor is out, if you reach into the spur gear to twist it for proper rotation, spring action will be felt for about 15 degrees. The spring cushions drive start, and lets motor start a bit. There is a travel limit, so machine will work, but feels clunky on start. My wife used a 101, for a few heavy projects, then she noticed a change in starting.
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Dave in middle TN
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mtboze

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Reply with quote  #28 
One last note, early in the thread I mentioned the difficulty getting the cast iron Arm Flange Bushing off the the 1924 aluminum machine. Taking the same part off the 1929 iron machine was much easier. After reading stuff online, I think I'm convinced that the issue is "galvanic corrosion", where dissimilar metals (aluminum and cast iron) touching each other over a period of time can, as in this case, basically cause the metals to be hard to separate. So, this is my layman's attempt at a scientific explanation for a problem I barely understand, that hopefully no one else will ever experience, but made me feel better.

Cheers,

Ron
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