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andyl

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Reply with quote  #251 
I spent my lunch hour cleaning and oiling the heck out of the Standard Rotary Slim, and darn if she didn't just up and do this, pretty as you please.

Top thread stitches (I think)

Top_stitches.jpg 

And bobbin thread stitches (probably).  That short bit at the bottom of the photo was the very first attempt.

Bottom_Stitches.jpg 

That piece of fabric is just over 3" x 3", so those are very tiny, even little stitches.  The fabric ended up dirty and oily as all get out, which in turn meant it picked up All the Cat Fur before I could snap the photos.  But I'm just shocked it sews.

It wasn't quite as easy as all that, of course, since the little pigtail thread guide got jammed tight up against the body of the machine when the handwheel was broken, so I couldn't get any thread in there, but it's nothing a little work with a screwdriver and wrench couldn't handle.  There's no finish at all left on that part of the machine, so I wasn't worried about doing any damage.

And the (good grief, I have no idea what it's called) metal bar on the front of the machine, which sticks out of the top half of the (potentially) shiny metal faceplate and holds the thread and goes up and down (the manual refers to it as the "take up slot", but that's not very explanatory)... it hits the metal face plate at the bottom of its travel.  When I am turning the handwheel, I can feel it binds a little there, every 3rd or 4th turn of the handwheel, but not 100% of the time.  When I oil the heck out of it, through the oil hole above the screw that fastens it, it sometimes runs effortlessly for 20 or 30 turns of the handwheel, or more.  So I don't know if it's a lubrication issue, or if something got bent or jammed when it got tossed around.  Or maybe it's just how this machine runs, and once the treadle's attached I wouldn't ever notice it.  It certainly sounds like every other black cast iron sewing machine I've ever heard.  No extra squeaks or clanks or rattles.  The fact that it can run smoothly gives me hope.  And if I take the faceplate off entirely, it's smooth as glass.

Any suggestions for that issue?  Is this just how that part works, using the face plate to stop at the bottom of its movement?  Or is it not even something to worry about.  My husband said he could file the slot in the faceplate a little lower, though he warned me it wouldn't be pretty.  It doesn't look like that bar would bend easily, but is taking it out of the machine and trying to bend it up a tiny bit an option?.  It feels like it would only need a tiny bit more clearance.

Does it sound like it might get better with oiling and cleaning?  Or should I be looking around for a replacement?  Or is this something that you can't diagnose without pictures or seeing it in person?

One issue is, I had to wind the bobbin by hand because, without the leather belt and the treadle cabinet, there's no way to power the bobbin winder, and this bobbin doesn't fit on my modern Singer's bobbin winder.  How do people who use this as a handcrank machine power the bobbin winder? 

Luckily, the machine didn't object to my hand wound bobbin.  Such a trooper!

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andyl

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Reply with quote  #252 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
AndyL does the machine stitch?


YES!!!  [biggrin]
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #253 
Can you fit a Chinese hand crank mechanism on the broken wheel? I have my doubts - I would be scared to treadle just because I know where my hand would go and ouch.
I thought of another hand crank solution. Maybe you could find an old hand crank knife sharpener and attach it to the case or table. Then rig an arm for it to fit the spokes.
With a hand crank, If I had a spare bobbin, I would be winding the next bobbin as i sew.
Can you run a belt from the hand wheel to power the bobbin winder? or is it friction wheel?

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andyl

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Reply with quote  #254 
I'll look into those handwheel suggestions, thanks!  I hadn't thought of other devices that use handwheels.  Hmmmm.

I'm not too concerned about jury rigging the bobbin winder because, as far as I can tell, once I get it into the table the treadle belt will run the bobbin winder.  I just needed to wind a short bit by hand today, so I could see if it actually made stitches. 

I was just asking because I was curious how it worked with a handcrank on these machines. I figured there must be some way it works for them and I'm just not seeing how that would happen on this machine unless there's another part that gets added, or that got snapped off with the missing bit of handwheel.  Totally idle curiosity for me, since I'm planning on inserting it into the table at some point soon.

The table's been empty and has followed me from house to house for 3+ decades, so all the iron bits inside are completely covered with furry dust.  I've got a fair amount of cleaning to do before I drop the machine in and attach the pulley, and I wanted to do a good job cleaning and waxing the machine itself first anyway.  I already bought a leather belt, I'm just trying not to get ahead of myself by putting everything together before it's all cleaned up.  (Anyone want to take bets on how long THAT resolution will last?)
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Tom W

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Reply with quote  #255 
I tip my hat to you for your creativity and determination. However, like Miriam, I'd be very concerned with threadling. I'd have a bloody mess of a hand in short order as it reaches quite automatically for the flywheel.
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dreamsinblues51

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Reply with quote  #256 
This is what I'm doing today: trying to clean out my shed so I can move some stuff in there so I have more room for my machines. Saw this Singer child's machine on CL for $50. Almost nothing here goes for less than $50. I see it for around $100 on ebay. Need to be cleaning my shed and can't get it out of my mind. Is that a crazy price?

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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #257 
Looks like a good price to me. They usually seem to go for that $80-100 mark.
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andyl

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Reply with quote  #258 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom W
I tip my hat to you for your creativity and determination. However, like Miriam, I'd be very concerned with threadling. I'd have a bloody mess of a hand in short order as it reaches quite automatically for the flywheel.


I am definitely not going to be sewing more than sample test scraps on this machine without figuring out a way to replace or defang the handwheel.  I do want to get it into the cabinet, and all hooked up, to make sure the all the cabinet hardware is in working order.  It's possible it may not be, since it was given to me as a piece of decorative furniture, and never represented as a working treadle unit. 

But I'm definitely not hooking it up without some serious padding on those sharp edges.  At the very least a healthy dose of quilt batting and electrical tape.  I am a nearsighted clutz on a good day.  Whacking myself on my computer hand with a heavy, sharp piece of metal at speed is not on my list of Things to Do.

Thanks for the warning!  [smile]
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #259 
Clear plastic tubing from Lowes Take a broken piece in there and get a good fit
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phansen

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Reply with quote  #260 
Andyl. To bad some of the pieces are missing. I could silver braze that handwheel back together. Steve could you cast a replacement wheel or part? With a filler piece I could braze it all together and true the wheel up on my lathe. Would not be perfect but better than the handwheel is now
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sewbeadit

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Reply with quote  #261 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom W
If this was an eBay purchase I'd file a claim through purchase protection - the pictures alone should be enough to get you a refund of the purchase and shipping charges. It's worked for me, especially when something is not easily replaced and the seller/shipper is blatantly negligent. You won't have to pay for return shipping either.  I am very sorry for your experience and am physically ill from viewing the pictures.


I agree.
We always took pictures and then fought with the seller, there is no excuse.  It makes me want to bawl seeing that.  I know how you feel, we have lots of horror stories to tell about buying from ebay.  All of them had told me they knew how to ship machines and they would do a good job!  ONe guy told me I didn't pay much for it so who cares?  The others mostly came through and I never sent one back to them, they saw the pictures, can't fake all of that.  Fight it.

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sewbeadit

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Reply with quote  #262 
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyl
Thanks, everyone, for the sympathy!  It's nice to have a spot where everyone understands exactly how distraught I was to see what was done to this poor machine.

_-----------The Shipping co should have insurance on that machine and packing.  I had to go through them with one that was packed by them, was a huge box with, honestly one piece of brown paper thrown in, and the machine and case were toast when it arrived, I was horrified of their packing.--------

I don't know about the shipping costs.  I suspect so, but I didn't ask.  Seemed a bad time to rub salt in the wound for the seller... now they're out money instead of me.  No one wins.  [frown]

I have a treadle cabinet for this machine so I'm hoping that, once I get it cleaned up, I can still put it in the cabinet and use it with the treadle while I'm hunting down a new handwheel.  If it didn't sustain any damage to the working bits banging around in the UPS truck, that is.  I hope I'll know more this weekend, once I get time to start oiling and cleaning things.

It won't be exactly decorative, with that jagged wheel remnant on there.  But I'm not giving up hope that this little machine can someday be back to work.  It's some comfort that the finish wasn't perfect to start with.  I'm not sure what kind of vapors I'd be having if this had started out in mint condition.

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sewbeadit

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Reply with quote  #263 
This whole thread is making me sick to my stomach!  So sorry for all of you that have gone through this stuff.


Quote:
Originally Posted by hilltophomesteader
That's the worst part of poor shipping - the loss of a piece of history.  People don't seem to realize (care?) that once it's gone, it's GONE!  No doubt we've all got our sob stories....here's one of mine.
DSCF3938.JPG  DSCF3937.JPG 

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #264 
[bawl] [bawl] [bawl] [bawl]


broken658arrow.JPG 

Janey



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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #265 
100_3382.JPG  On a better note, today I worked on this National rotary TREADLE cabinet.  Even the cast iron pedal and pitman fold away behind the closed door.  Lots of veneer to repair.  Very neat cabinet
John

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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #266 
That's gonna be nice John. I have a Montgomery Wards treadle desk where the irons were hidden behind a door. At some point someone removed the irons and put little drawers behind the door.

Cari

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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #267 
Andy, that's really too bad about your machine.  There really is no excuse for such sloppiness in packing.  Here's another one for you.  We live out in a rural area, I should say somewhat rural area -- we have 2+ acres, and our house sits back about 150+ feet through the trees, our driveway is fenced along both sides up close to the house.  I had a priority US Mail shipment which my cousin sent me -- the buy merely threw the package over the fence and left it there.  Seeing as how it was quilt fabric, I would have been more than ticked had it been raining here.  There was NO LOCK on the gate, and no dog in the fence either!  My fabric was okay because it wasn't raining, but ----- I was p____d!  Jeanette
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andyl

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Reply with quote  #268 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeanette Frantz
I had a priority US Mail shipment which my cousin sent me -- the buy merely threw the package over the fence and left it there.


[confused]

I don't even know what to say to that.  What the heck are the mail carriers thinking? 

I bought a lovely vintage Norwegian sewing box last fall, the kind with 3 trays that accordion out to the sides.  It showed up in a package that looked about like this sewing machine's box.  It had cracked right through the front corner of one of the trays.  It was a small enough crack that we were at least able to glue and clamp it, but it's never going to be like new, or as strong.  It's a corner that's under tension when it's opened and closed over and over, and it's probable that the glue join could fail at some point.  I paid a bit more than other boxes were going for, because it had been in such nice shape.  Not anymore.

Honestly, the shipping companies don't seem to give a darn what condition things arrive in.  I always thought we were paying them all that money to get stuff here in the same condition it was in when they accepted it.  Apparently not.  [frown]
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #269 
Customer service is a dying art in this country. I hate that, but it's true.
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Margaret 
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andyl

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Reply with quote  #270 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
Clear plastic tubing from Lowes Take a broken piece in there and get a good fit


Now there's a thought.  I'll bet I can get some plastic tubing on there well enough to provide enough of a cushion to keep me from breaking my hand if (heck, when... got to be honest) I forget about the broken wheel and grab for just the wrong spot.

This machine was supposed to be a large part of my Birthday present this year.  But my husband said that my present shouldn't make me sad.  So he's bought me another Standard Rotary Slim Treadle machine, pretty much the same era, which is coming with a full set of attachments to boot.

This poor machine isn't getting abandoned, I still want to find a handwheel for it.  And I'll still fix it up, and try to find it its own full set of attachments.  But now there won't be such a hurry, because I'll have a machine to sew on and set up in that cabinet, and will have plenty of time to track down a parts machine or handwheel to help make this one whole again. 

Worst case, this one lives in my office, on the bookshelf next to my spinning wheels, and just has to look pretty.  Best case, I'll find an intact handwheel for it some day, and be able to use it as my back-of-the-house machine when there are people over and I can't be sewing in the living room. 

Fingers crossed for a safe journey for Standard Rotary Slim Treadle machine #2!


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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #271 
S end the new seller a photo and maybe they will pack it with more care
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andyl

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Reply with quote  #272 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
S end the new seller a photo and maybe they will pack it with more care


I asked if they had shipped machines before, and they said they have, and they have good ratings for the similarly heavy vintage items they've sold, which I can't imagine happening if they hadn't packed them carefully. 

I explained why I was on edge about it, and they made understanding and helpful noises.  I am trying NOT to be nervous.  Only partially successfully, but at this point the only thing I can do is trust that it doesn't make sense for a shop to sell things regularly that don't show up in useable condition.

In the meantime, I'm taking deep breaths and trying to keep busy with other things.
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #273 
Good luck, Andy!
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Margaret 
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HelenAnn

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Reply with quote  #274 
Well I picked this one up because it was close, for me. This is my first chain stitcher and I need a manual for her. The cabinet needs work but I like to make them sew first.

I feel your pain Andy. I had very bad experience last year.
HelenAnn

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jpeg image.jpeg (817.58 KB, 43 views)
jpeg image.jpeg (1.02 MB, 45 views)
jpeg image.jpeg (847.56 KB, 45 views)


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andyl

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Reply with quote  #275 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelenAnn
Well I picked this one up because it was close, for me. This is my first chain stitcher and I need a manual for her. The cabinet needs work but I like to make them sew first. I feel your pain Andy. I had very bad experience last year. HelenAnn


I just love the artistry that goes into these machines.  In that last picture of yours, the outline of that metal piece looks like a butterfly.  Such a pretty machine.  I'll be it looks wonderful, once you get that cabinet fixed up.

Nice find!
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Christy

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Reply with quote  #276 
Helen Ann, that's beautiful!  
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morningstar

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Reply with quote  #277 
  I also have one of those child Singers --chain stitch that works. Good price.  Went back reading posts  --HelenAnn  the totes we make are  2  squares  of fabric 22 in , same for lining  with 2 handles add pockets. --very easy so for more info pm me

Christy,  I also have a Singer 27 to repair but it sits in north  for the last 3 years until I finally ordered the 2 simple parts I needed --one is the cover for bobbin --forgot what other is.  Even though it is unusual how I got the machine I really haven't bonded with it so it sits in cabinet
needing to be fixed.  Noticed it has a big harp size so I may be sorry I don't use it .  Decals are OK but not the best.

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #278 
Just so we are clear, The machine that HelenAnn posted is NOT a child's sewing machine.  That is a Willcox & Gibbs.  
That had the longest run of production of any sewing machine in history.  They began in the 1860's (the Automatic was introduced in the 1870's) and was produced until the 1960's

The stitch that it makes is different from the stitches made by the toy chainstitchers.

The looper on the W&G adds a twist to lock the stitch.

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Christy

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Reply with quote  #279 
My Featherweight cabinet was in time-out for a couple months but I am back to working on it.  I am currently in search of the perfect coat of polyurethane.  I don't have a "clean room" so the perfect coat will get a few dust bits, but I would love to at least get an even flow, without drips, sags, pools, missed spots, or over-brushing!

I'd love to say I am on the last coat, but that all depends on how it lays down!  I've thought last coat a few times now!

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Farmhousesewer

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Reply with quote  #280 
I am having trouble following the discussions under this topic. If a separate thread was started on the New Scotch forgive me.

Mick, according to Needlebar, I originally expected the New Scotch to have been made by either Justin Mathieu or George Mathieu Fils. Both used the name. Manufacturer was located in Verdun, France.

Then again, according to a discussion on Needlebar, it is likely a German Machine distributed by Mathieu in France, given a non German name due to the war.

See  http://needlebar.org/nbwiki/images/1/1c/GergoviamundlosoriginalvicB.jpg


Very good quality German machines were being sold in Europe, with different names, to hide their source of origin.

Look at this Original Victoria retailed by Friedrich Landsiedel, Cassel 

http://needlebar.org/nbwiki/index.php/Donna

Then again, it could be made by Munlos, another German Manufacturer. See

http://www.sewmuse.co.uk/Mundlos.htm

While I can't give you a definitive answer, I hope this at least puts you on a path of adventure and discovery.





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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #281 
Maria - I think that is because the idea for this thread was a place to put up a post along the lines of "what I did today on my sewing machine" and the like.  Not to be a spot for discussing stuff.  because of that discussions will get lost here.  a reply or two on a post is totally expected, but if there is interest in discussion a post in more detail it should become a new thread (IMO)  

NOT A RULE, just thoughts

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Christy

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Reply with quote  #282 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
Maria - I think that is because the idea for this thread was a place to put up a post along the lines of "what I did today on my sewing machine" and the like.  Not to be a spot for discussing stuff.  because of that discussions will get lost here.  a reply or two on a post is totally expected, but if there is interest in discussion a post in more detail it should become a new thread (IMO)  

NOT A RULE, just thoughts


I was worried I posted in the wrong  thread!  That's what I thought the thread was for--for sharing our daily trials and successes.  No one but other vintage sewing machine enthusiasts would be interested at all in my stories about tinkering on such things!  It's good to have a place to come to where others share the same hobby.  [crazy]

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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #283 
Riccar 510 adventure...I took this to the VSS workshop with me, but we really didn't have time to do anything to it there.  The feed dogs would not pull the fabric through except in reverse - needle just went up and down in the same place.

Well, this is a plastic machine, pretty low end, so I don't want to spend too much time on it. However, I have a friend who helps teach sewing to disadvantaged women and she needs a couple of lightweight machines, so I'm trying to fix it.  It was full of lint, so I cleaned that out.  It was dry as a bone, so I oiled it and let it sit.  It had a very short presser foot, which I think was adding to the problem (not enough foot connecting with the fabric), so I put on another one.  Fiddled with the tension and the presser foot pressure, and it goes forward now!!

The stitches are not too great - shorter on top and longer on the bottom, which I've never seen before.  Using two different types of thread, so I'll fix that tomorrow.  I'll fiddle with the top and bobbin tensions as well (Miriam - I am becoming courageous!).  

Wish me luck!

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sewbeadit

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Reply with quote  #284 
Margaret, that is great you are making headway on that machine.  Sometimes just sitting down and messing with things, in a good way,lol, you can find out a lot of things.  That was really clean in the inside top, hope it becomes a good stitcher for someone as it was a nice looking clean machine.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaret
Riccar 510 adventure...I took this to the VSS workshop with me, but we really didn't have time to do anything to it there.  The feed dogs would not pull the fabric through except in reverse - needle just went up and down in the same place.

Well, this is a plastic machine, pretty low end, so I don't want to spend too much time on it. However, I have a friend who helps teach sewing to disadvantaged women and she needs a couple of lightweight machines, so I'm trying to fix it.  It was full of lint, so I cleaned that out.  It was dry as a bone, so I oiled it and let it sit.  It had a very short presser foot, which I think was adding to the problem (not enough foot connecting with the fabric), so I put on another one.  Fiddled with the tension and the presser foot pressure, and it goes forward now!!

The stitches are not too great - shorter on top and longer on the bottom, which I've never seen before.  Using two different types of thread, so I'll fix that tomorrow.  I'll fiddle with the top and bobbin tensions as well (Miriam - I am becoming courageous!).  

Wish me luck!

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Reply with quote  #285 
Margaret I agree with Lynn. I think if you just keep playing and giving it oil and love it will straighten itself out. I also noticed how clean it was inside and nothing looked cracked or broken so fingers crossed for you!

Cari

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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #286 
Thanks, Lynn and Cari!
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andyl

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Reply with quote  #287 

It's here, it's here!  Safe and sound, they did an outstanding packing job.

Standard_Rotary_Treadle_II.jpg
  Standard_Logo.jpg 
Decals_Front_Rt_02.jpg 
Central_Medallion.jpg 

Solid, and smooth, and sewing away like a champ.  Someone obviously gave it a good coat of carwax.  It's positively glowing (look at those reflections!).  I need to get better at treadling, but that's me and not the machine.  ETA:  I had to fiddle with the pictures a lot, because I didn't want to use the flash, so the black isn't as dark and the decals are a bit more saturated than in real life.  But it's pretty close.

One cool thing, the seller sent the attachments along in a kind of interesting looking open-topped box.  It's fabric lined, with a teeny pin cusion on the side.  On a whim, I slipped it into my treadle cabinet drawer, and it fit perfectly on the wooden slides mounted on the side of the drawer, perfectly flush with the top of the drawer.  Must have been originally made to fit into one of these cabinets.  Just a neat little detail.  The inside of the box is black on black, so I had no luck getting a decent picture.  I'd try again tomorrow, in the daylight outdoors.

I am absolutely over the moon.


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sewbeadit

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Reply with quote  #288 
Andy, that is one beautiful sewing machine, I am in awe.  I am so glad for you it arrived in on piece.  Did they ship the cabinet too?  
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andyl

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Reply with quote  #289 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sewbeadit
Andy, that is one beautiful sewing machine, I am in awe.  I am so glad for you it arrived in on piece.  Did they ship the cabinet too?  


No, the cabinet's what started this whole search.  My ex-MIL gave it to me, years ago, but no machine.  She'd had it in her living room, but was given a different cabinet, with machine, so I got this one.  It belonged to a friend of hers, I think, and had originally been stained/painted avocado green.  Behold!  The Green of Epic Wrongness!

Green of Epic Wrongness 02.JPG 

They had stripped it before I got it, but the inside of the drawers - and the back panel, obviously - are still bilious green.  Still, I love it in spite of that green.  I was told at the time that it was an odd size, compared to the Singer cabinets, and there wouldn't be much chance of my finding a machine to fit.  And there it sat, sans machine, for the next 3 decades.

It wasn't until I started trying to find a replacement for my Grandmother's old Singer that I realized maybe I could find the right machine for this cabinet.  And when I saw the Standard Rotary Slim, I fell in love.  All Hail the Internet!

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Reply with quote  #290 
Andyl - I could not be happier for you!!!  Fantastic!  Our beginnings are similar, I got into this to get a copy of the machine my grandmother had and my uncle tossed in the dump...
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andyl

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Reply with quote  #291 
In the dump?  Ouch!  That had to hurt!

I guess, over the years, you've seen machines like your Grandmother's ten times over.  It's nice to give one a home where it will get to be productive again.  I occasionally need to remind myself that the real gift my Grandmother, and Mother, and MIL gave me was the gift of sewing.
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #292 
Andyl -  I think the real gifts were the gift of time, of teaching, of taking no excuses, and of lovel My mother taught me to sew and to hand embroider.  My MIL taught me to knit (although I'm not to  good). My SIL taught me to quilt.  My professional teachers taught me to be patient and go slow.  My internet buddies taught me to take risks (aaaah - change the bobbin tension!!  AND the TOP tension!!

Family is best, but the internet has been a very close second in teaching us the skills we need.  let's keep the last two centuries alive, ok??!

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #293 
In addition to the above, my mom taught me never give up.
Failure is just only a learning experience.

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Christy

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Reply with quote  #294 
My father always said you can spend your money paying someone else to do a job for you, or you can spend your money acquiring the tools and knowledge to do the job yourself.  If you do it yourself it will be less expensive, more rewarding, and you will have the ability to do it again for free next time you need it done.  I've also noticed when you do it yourself you take more pride in your work so the job usually comes out much better!
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  • Christy
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TwassG

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Reply with quote  #295 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christy
My father always said you can spend your money paying someone else to do a job for you, or you can spend your money acquiring the tools and knowledge to do the job yourself.  If you do it yourself it will be less expensive, more rewarding, and you will have the ability to do it again for free next time you need it done.  I've also noticed when you do it yourself you take more pride in your work so the job usually comes out much better!



Lol, I just got my newly aquired Bernina Record 830 back today. It was at the shop for repairs because I didn't trusted myself with soldering a new capacitator into the motor. The sad thing is, I learned that in school 20 years ago but didn't trusted myself on this one tbh. I really need to shape up on my skills coming future. Could have saved me 38 € on this one.
My grandfather was the same type of man as your father. He always, always, always repaired anything on its own. The whole neighbourhood came with its toys, radios, tvs, cameras, sewing machines etc for repairs. And you know what? I can feel his scolding look on my back even though he's not here anymore. But maybe that's because I'm more angy at myself if that makes any sense.


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ArchaicArcane

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Reply with quote  #296 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christy
My father always said you can spend your money paying someone else to do a job for you, or you can spend your money acquiring the tools and knowledge to do the job yourself.  If you do it yourself it will be less expensive, more rewarding, and you will have the ability to do it again for free next time you need it done.  I've also noticed when you do it yourself you take more pride in your work so the job usually comes out much better!


Very true, except for roofing.  Roofers are worth their weight in gold! I've owned houses for more than 15 years (one of them bought as a fixer upper to learn) and that's one of 2 jobs I will farm out every time.  My knees are STILL not the same going on 2 years after doing the roof here!  The other job is furnace replacement.  Anything else, I will try or have tried and will do again.  Same goes for our vehicles.  They go in for tires and the odd oil change if neither of us is up to it, otherwise, it's all done by us.

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Christy

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Reply with quote  #297 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane


Very true, except for roofing.  Roofers are worth their weight in gold! I've owned houses for more than 15 years (one of them bought as a fixer upper to learn) and that's one of 2 jobs I will farm out every time.  My knees are STILL not the same going on 2 years after doing the roof here!  The other job is furnace replacement.  Anything else, I will try or have tried and will do again.  Same goes for our vehicles.  They go in for tires and the odd oil change if neither of us is up to it, otherwise, it's all done by us.


I've never tried roofing but carpet layers are worth there weight in gold.  I tried one of those knee stretchers and my knee was majorly bruised!  Still, there are so many jobs that I've been happier with my work than what I've seen done by "professionals".  

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  • Christy
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ArchaicArcane

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Reply with quote  #298 
I believe that.  I've only ever removed carpet.  I've never installed it.  I think the jobs a lot of professionals do these days is why my maintenance class is so popular.  People want to learn to do it themselves because they see what comes back from the shop.

Today's sewing machine adventure for me is just sewing and quilting!  So far, no character building. The upside of doing the maintenance and cleaning ahead of time. [wink]

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #299 
40 years ago I roofed our garage. I sat up there and sang, "I am woman, I can do anything." All the old ladies in the neighborhood applauded... I can't tell you how many roofs I've worked on since but it is job for someone younger than me these days. I never did do steep roofs. I've never done carpet but I've done a lot of ceramic. I love it when I get to design with it. We used to do million dollar houses. I did the cutting and my DH set it. In my over stuffed garage is enough surplus odd pieces to do my breeze way some day. It will be very very scrappy. I'm thinking there is a medallion in pieces out there to put in the center of it then see what evolves. My favorite project that I did was an entry way out of 6 full size slate squares and a Pile of cut offs. I used a full tile and filled in with scraps to make random 16 Inch squares. lots of character. That was up against Brazillian hard wood. That house had a really ugly fire place and we refaced it with real expensive stuff left over from a wall. There wasn't one little piece left over on that one. Just a little face lift can do wonders.
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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #300 
I did some cleaning and lubrication on my serger today -- I had some quilt fabric I wanted to wash before I cut blocks, and before serging the fabric to prevent excessive raveling in the wash, I thought it might be a good idea to clean and lubricate the serger.  It had not been used in quite some time.  One batch of the fabric is now ready to go in the dryer, and the other needs to go into the wash.  Miriam, my husband (died in 2004) was a cabinet maker and I worked right beside him on a lot of projects (yes, even on the roof at our old house).  More than once I've worked a full day at the law office where I was employed, and then gone to the shop to work either on the books or on cabinet doors, etc. for another 8 hours.  It makes for some very long days!  LOL!
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Jeanette Frantz, Ocala, Florida
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