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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #1 
Ok, folks, share you brilliance here.

Save OIL, (in the form of plastic) restore a Cast Iron Machine!

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #2 
Rebuilding Rubber Drive Wheels
I've recently started a blog to post some of my projects.  Some would have been allowed on QB, some of the things I want to do wouldn't be.  The blog is still in it's infancy, not much content there yet.
This is an article I posted on rebuilding friction drive wheels.
https://sewwhatman.wordpress.com/2015/09/29/sewing-machine-rubber-drive-wheels/

Steve if you don't want links to member blogs go ahead and remove it.  I'll copy the info over another way.
Thanks,
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #3 
I have no issues with link to your blog.  Or any blog at this point.

Drive on!  The idea is to share knowledge, not "own it all"

Steve

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
Ok, folks, share you brilliance here.

Save OIL, (in the form of plastic) restore a Cast Iron Machine!

ha might have to start saving all those stupid plastic machines in that case.

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #5 
I should clarify. I have no issues with vintage machines. I just prefer antique mysrlf. All are really welcome here.
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Grant

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Reply with quote  #6 
I have a lot of Tips And Tricks I have shared in a folder on my page. Should I list what is there and add the link to the page, or should I do each one separately, and cut and paste them here?
~G~

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #7 
How old is vintage and how old is antique? Then there is retro... There are some old plastic machines that do have a following.
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Grant

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Reply with quote  #8 
Those definitions have been a source of confusion. I have been using Antique and Vintage to describe the machines I deal with, but I think it is a pretty loose set of terms. I would also like some clarification.
By definition, an antique is 100+ years old. Any machine that is 100+ years old I call them Antiques. Almost anything from 99 years old and up to about 1970, I refer to as Vintage.
~G~

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #9 
Grant's reply is pretty much what I use too.  After the 1970s machines started using a lot more plastic and started getting some electronic controls.  It seems like a fairly decent guideline to me.
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
How old is vintage and how old is antique? Then there is retro... There are some old plastic machines that do have a following.


are we spoiling for an argument here??...  hehe

It is not up to me to decide what is what.  share what you love, the board's interests will drive the rest.

although I think it would be nice if we could try to put the chit chat in the chit chat thread and "try" to keep these cleaner for information. 

My.02

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J Miller

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
How old is vintage and how old is antique? Then there is retro... There are some old plastic machines that do have a following.


are we spoiling for an argument here??...  hehe

It is not up to me to decide what is what.  share what you love, the board's interests will drive the rest.

although I think it would be nice if we could try to put the chit chat in the chit chat thread and "try" to keep these cleaner for information. 

My.02


Steve,

Here we have a subject and we are discussing it.   You mentioned moving the chit chat to that section not here.   To do that we have to break our line of discussion, move it then restart it.   That blows the continuity down the toilet.   This is part of the information process and the part that QuiltnNan was trying to stifle.    

To me this whole thread has been more to define our terms than just gossiping.   That's what I perceive the chit chat section to be for ... gossiping.

JMHO

Joe

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Visit our Etsy store for pet related goodies and other items too.
https://www.etsy.com/shop/TBearsAndOtherWares?ele=shop_open

I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
JM in FT Wayne, IN

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #12 
Good point!  I retract my suggestion.  
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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #13 
I am in the process of working on a Singer 27 I found in a thrift shop for a few bucks and I mean cheap. Less than a fiver. It is really dirty. I have cleaned it up and got it sew and as it turned out is a wonderful sewer. Beautiful stitch.  I am going to see if I can make it pretty again using techs in my tutorial on QB. This will be a journey for sure. I am going to see if I can help the decals to. So far just cleaned so I could get it sewing.  More to come.DSCF0317.JPG 

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #14 
I believe that the "Pheasant" is one of the sets not currently being reproduced, but dang it is pretty none the less.

Like Miriam says, the worn ones sew best!

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #15 
I've got two Pheasants.  The wear on both is similar to yours. I've sewn with one of them and I love the way it sews too.  The second one I had to rob a couple parts to get the other going and haven't replaced them yet,
I do love the pattern.
Yours is looking really good so far.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #16 
So if you go with 100 years there were some model machines made for another 30 or 40 years but slightly modified. Just had to muddy....
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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #17 
Those would still fall under vintage.  Singer made the same basic machines for many years. For instance the model 15,66,99 and 27/127 or 28/128 series machines. Domestic sewing machine technology advanced quickly after WWII with the Japanese copying then improving the model 15.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #18 
Rodney if I were at home and could lift and find a clear space and had the time... maybe some day... Any way I would do a line up by dates I'm thinking I have Singer 15s, 99s and 66s from a lot of different decades... There are fifferent features whether or improvements or not... The older 15s had heavier hand wheels like the 27s. I'm not sure of their time span either. I believe it may be pretty long, too. What I DO know is when I find one nearly worn out I like it better than the pristine looking machines no matter the birthday.
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Mizkaki

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Reply with quote  #19 
Rodney,

I checked out your post on the motor pulleys. Thank you. I have a National made Montgomery Wards machine with a shot pulley. I am going to try your technique.
Thank you!, 
mizkaki  (Cathy)

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #20 
You're welcome.  The rubber stoppers are relatively untested.  I don't know how hard the rubber is compared to original so they might wear out slightly quicker.  It does beat no drive wheel though.
There is a limited range of new ones available too. SewClassic.com has some and there are also Ebay sellers.
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redmadder

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Reply with quote  #21 
I don't have much to offer in the realm of sewing machine restoration.  Piecing quilts is another story.  However, more than anything I want to rebuild the motors.  Can anyone tell me where to find books, blogs, instructions, fellow obsessives?
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #22 
I would be interested in seeing a thread by a "motor person" on the tear down, clean, and rebuild of an electric motor.  I have two to do and am waiting until this happens or a local person runs a class on motor 101-201...
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KenmoreGal2

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Reply with quote  #23 
I would also be interested in this. I know nothing.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #24 
There are two tutorials on line that have proven themselves invaluable to me. One is Rains blog -
http://vssmb.blogspot.com/2012/01/complete-how-to-re-wire-potted-motor.html

The other is McKenna Lynns motor tute -
http://www.mckennalinn.com/sewing-machine-how-tos/cleaning-a-motor.html

Both are thorough with lots of pics. I agree that a hands on class would be awesome. I need to do the motor on my 201-2 and I can't get the motor off of it.

Cari

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Mizkaki

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS
I would be interested in seeing a thread by a "motor person" on the tear down, clean, and rebuild of an electric motor.  I have two to do and am waiting until this happens or a local person runs a class on motor 101-201...


Steve,

Next time you are up here I'll give you that class. These small universal motors are pretty simple. I'm much better at teaching in person than writing up instructions

Cathy



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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #26 
I have decided it would be a better idea to clean up some of the machines that I have now rather than try to obtain more. I'll start with my 1906 Singer 27. I have removed the needle bar and associated foolishness. What should I soak it in to get the gummed up oil off? Also, how should I go about getting the scum off of the body of the machine?

And is this the right place to post this, or should I start my own thread?

20160212_130352_001.jpg


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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #27 
Wive seen worse come off with naphtha or maybe denatured alcohol. You might get a lot off with Dawn. Not something I would take apart. Is it not moving?
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #28 
I've had one machine that looked like that. Lots of qtips, rags and 90% rubbing alcohol got it clean.

Cari

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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #29 

DKuehn - either way to post it is fine.  leave it hear and it will blend with other convo's new thread and it's all by itself.  no stress either way.

I use Howards Orange oil polish for the body,.  so far it has not harmed a single bit of artwork, painted or decals.  For the exposed metal areas I use Brasso and 0000 steel wool.  SM oil for cleanup


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KenmoreGal2

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Reply with quote  #30 
Interesting question Miriam. As a newbie I have to ask - if it's dirty but it works, do you still go to great lengths to clean it? 
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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #31 
I thought I saw acetone mentioned so I tried that. It got clean pretty quick.

20160212_161255.jpg 


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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #32 
Now I have to work on the body of the machine.
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenmoreGal2
Interesting question Miriam. As a newbie I have to ask - if it's dirty but it works, do you still go to great lengths to clean it? 

Depends on if I fall in love with it or not. Some times I do just to see if I can.

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KenmoreGal2

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Reply with quote  #34 
Meaning if you fall in love with it, you'll leave it alone? Just in case you do some damage by mistake? Or did I get what you meant totally wrong?
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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miriam
Wive seen worse come off with naphtha or maybe denatured alcohol. You might get a lot off with Dawn. Not something I would take apart. Is it not moving?


It was moving and worked just fine, I just wanted to clean it up some. I like to work on them so I'm trying to expand my abilities some. I was a little nervous taking it all apart, but it's the only way I'll learn. 

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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenmoreGal2
Meaning if you fall in love with it, you'll leave it alone? Just in case you do some damage by mistake? Or did I get what you meant totally wrong?
y
I'm reasonably sure I'm not going to hurt one of the old machines. They are mostly bullet proof. It is the ones with plastic that scare the Willies out of me... Nope I don't leave them alone, they sew so nice when they are cleaned up.

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KenmoreGal2

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Reply with quote  #37 
Ah - I got you 100% wrong. Thanks for clarifying! So you notice a difference when it's clean even if it seems to be working fine before?
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #38 
Just about any machine works better cleaned up and freshly oiled
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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #39 
Trying to make it sew again, troubleshooting phase. If you look at my clean picture, there is something put together incorrectly. I have fixed that. Gonna check a couple other things and try again. 
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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #40 
I have the machine sewing again, but I did it by adjusting the needle in the holder, not by timing the needle bar. The needle bar in this machine, 1906 Singer 27 does not appear to be adjustable. The screw circled in red goes into the needle bar so there is no adjustment. And the piece with the screw goes onto the piece behind it with no apparent adjustment either. Perhaps when I was cleaning the parts I dislodged or dissolved a needle insertion stopper for timing adjustment, does that make sense? Anyone know how these are supposed to work. 

Like I said, I have it sewing again, just want to make sure I'm doing things roughly the correct way.

2608934.jpg


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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #41 
I used some Q-tips dipped in denatured alcohol to wipe down the machined part of the machine. It was pretty effective at getting all the dried oil off. Here is a comparison picture for before and after. 

20160213_091009 copy.jpg 


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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #42 
To make a case for a thorough cleaning and or disassembly is the fact that there are 3 or 4 hardened steel rollers in the mechanism, that are intended to roll.  A sm will appear to turn over smoothly even though one or more of these rollers are frozen to their shafts.  If not turning, these rollers will develop a flat spot, in addition to wearing the soft surfaces that they are supposed to roll on.  One roller is on the stitch length assembly, visible through the rear cover, two are under the bed, and for the model 27, a roller runs in a V shaped race behind the needle bar and gives motion to the needlebar.  Yes, I am anal about these rollers, and for me, they must all turn freely.  I hardly ever get a sm in which all of these roller bearings are free to spin.
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DKuehn

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Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH-VSS

DKuehn - either way to post it is fine.  leave it hear and it will blend with other convo's new thread and it's all by itself.  no stress either way.

I use Howards Orange oil polish for the body,.  so far it has not harmed a single bit of artwork, painted or decals.  For the exposed metal areas I use Brasso and 0000 steel wool.  SM oil for cleanup



I have acquired some Brazzo so I'll start trying to shine up some stainless parts here in the near future. I'll get some before and after shots to see the difference it makes.

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Jeanette Frantz

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Reply with quote  #44 
If I've got a machine, it has to work, or I have to work on it, and if I can't fix it, I know my son, Phillip, can fix it.  I wouldn't mend a split seam with a machine as dirty as some I've seen.  On the other hand, the 403A I've got was ridiculously clean, both inside and out, and it was in pristine condition, both in and out.  We went through it to clean it, found a very little bit of dust, but no "old", "hardened" oil, no masses of broken needles or pins, no mouse nests or anything like that.  Granted, my son was very lucky, but then, if it hadn't been in good condition, he would not have bought it!  The 201-2 I have was pretty dirty and the needle bar was stuck up.  My son was able to free that up with oil, time, heat, effort, and more of all four, but it's clean, now.  The 201 was missing a slide plate, and I bought one of those for the machine.  Also, someone had taken the tension assembly apart and put it back together wrong.   Since the machine cost me $-0-, I didn't object to the cost of the slide plate  Those slide plates and needle plates, in a majority of cases for machines I've "looked at" online, are going to be missing, PLUS replacements can be very expensive.  Remarkably, I bought a Minnesota  Model  A for my cousin in Arkansas, and both the slide plate and needle plate were there!
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #45 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmer John
To make a case for a thorough cleaning and or disassembly is the fact that there are 3 or 4 hardened steel rollers in the mechanism, that are intended to roll.  A sm will appear to turn over smoothly even though one or more of these rollers are frozen to their shafts.  If not turning, these rollers will develop a flat spot, in addition to wearing the soft surfaces that they are supposed to roll on.  One roller is on the stitch length assembly, visible through the rear cover, two are under the bed, and for the model 27, a roller runs in a V shaped race behind the needle bar and gives motion to the needlebar.  Yes, I am anal about these rollers, and for me, they must all turn freely.  I hardly ever get a sm in which all of these roller bearings are free to spin.
John


Those are the first thing to clean and oil. Yes they do dry up and I don't like to force them to move. I like to oil them well before I even test the machine.

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Farmer John

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Reply with quote  #46 
Yes, those rollers must roll freely on their shafts, by what ever means necessary.  Access is usually limited w/o disassembly, so I disassemble when necessary.  The rollers are very hard so I doubt that pliers would even mark them.  Heat will loosen them  and aggressive solvent will remove all traces of gum, until the rollers spin freely after the solvent has evaporated.  The rollers in the stitch length adjustment and the needle drive are free to be removed from their shafts, others are riveted in location.  The riveted rollers take extra time to get the gums dissolved from the roller faces and into the shaft area.
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PatriciaPf

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Reply with quote  #47 
I believe that the "Pheasant" is one of the sets not currently being reproduced, but dang it is pretty none the less

Pheasants have long tails.  This looks more like a grouse.

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Rodney

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Reply with quote  #48 
Maybe so.  I don't think I've seen ANY bird that looks quite like what's on the machine.  Pheasant is just the name they got, maybe because pheasant sounds better than grouse.
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redmadder

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Reply with quote  #49 
I did this to a darning plate for a modern quilting machine but if I get a needle plate on one of the vintage machines that has burrs, etc, it will work.  I got inventive since we didn't any abrasive cord on hand and I'm impatient.

I polished the burrs out by hand with a finishing nail.  Then I drilled a 1/4 inch hole in a block of wood, set the plate over the hole, sharpened the end of a dowel and set it in a hand drill.  Polished the hole with the wood until the hole and the area around it was smooth and now I'm quilting for real on the very used mid arm machine.  Now to order some fine abrasive cord.  That was too much thinking.[smile]


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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #50 
20160602_183716-640x360.jpg 

 this is one of my favorite modified tools, anyone care to guess what its for?
(The one on the right. ..)


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