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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #51 
And just for fun, look at this tag that my wife noticed in a garment that she was working on yesterday.  I hadn’t realized just how much importance that manufacturers put on me satisfying their product.  LOL!

CD in Oklahoma


20181003_145611.jpg 


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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #52 
My mom bought a shirt from an online clothes store that didnt allow returns and its armholes were sewn closed
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sewingforsolitude

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Reply with quote  #53 
CD, have you ever used a Singer 328K (with the cut-outs in the chassis for the belt) in a treadle machine? ZZ and straight stitch, should 'just drop in' to the treadle table, would compliment my 15-88 in a separate treadle. And I'm still learning the treadling part.
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #54 
Hi sewingforsolitude.  No, I haven’t actually put a Singer 328K into a treadle, but I’ve read that other people have and like them.  I have a couple of 328K and a couple of 327K machines that I may someday experiment with in treadle operation.  So far, I’ve only treadle-operated zigzag Singer machines 306W24, 319W1, and FM237.  (I set up the 237 Fashion Mate for my MIL in another state, and only used it for a brief time for testing.)

I use a multistitch zigzag for most of my mending, so I started with a treadle-operated 306 and removable cams.  I used it for jeans mending for about a year and a half, and then set up my 319 treadle that has the cams built-in and I didn’t have to swap the multi-zz (mending) and the regular zz (bar tack) cams back and forth.  I’ve used the 319 for jeans mending for the past four and a half years.

CD in Oklahoma


20131222_06.jpg 
20180613_162100.jpg 


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sewingforsolitude

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Reply with quote  #55 
Thanks for the detailed response; not only which machines you use, but why those particular machines are selected. My odds on ever finding a 306W24 or 319W1 in the greater YVR market is slim but I will take note of the multi-step zig-zag. Thanks.
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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #56 
mending my sweatshirt pocket and watching youtube with smokey
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smokeythecat

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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #58 
I’m fixing my friend’s pants and I put my knees up for one minute...
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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #59 
I added 3 patches this time. The other two were like 10 months ago. Someone’s thighs are serial pants killers. But none of the patched areas have worn through, just parts next to them

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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #60 
It was way less of a drag on the 27 than on the 99, partially cause of the bigger throat space and partially cause I’m more used to not having reverse now. The 27 does a nicer stitch than the one that reverses too.
Whoops i need to trim the unstitched corner out of the patch on the left
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #61 
I like seeing your straight-stitch mending smokeythecat.  There have been a lot of jeans mended that way over the years.  I get a pair in every once in a while with patches like yours, and they’re still holding as strong as ever.  Like you, I often have to mend next to the existing patches.

Jeans mending for me has been kind of slow lately.  That’s ok with me, because things usually go in spurts anyway.  I’ll get overrun again in time. I had a knee in one pair and a rear end in another pair this past week.  I was really pleased that I was able to puddle the knee under the needle on my Singer 319 treadle and achieve a nice-looking flat patch with no puckers on a pair of jeans with “smallish” tapered legs.  It’s so much nicer (and quicker) to not have to open the side seam for a knee repair.  As a matter of fact, I guess it went so fast that I didn’t take time to take photos of the repair.  I missed snapping a shot of the fanny too.  It was a fairly routine mend.

CD in Oklahoma


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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #62 
I just did laundry so I have to sort out the socks I noticed need darning. Im annoyed that they don’t make darning cotton anymore. I’ve been using doubled serger thread
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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #63 
Darning wool packets can sometimes be found at thrift stores.
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hilltophomesteader

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Reply with quote  #64 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThayerRags
Hi sewingforsolitude.  No, I haven’t actually put a Singer 328K into a treadle, but I’ve read that other people have and like them.  I have a couple of 328K and a couple of 327K machines that I may someday experiment with in treadle operation.  So far, I’ve only treadle-operated zigzag Singer machines 306W24, 319W1, and FM237.  (I set up the 237 Fashion Mate for my MIL in another state, and only used it for a brief time for testing.)

I use a multistitch zigzag for most of my mending, so I started with a treadle-operated 306 and removable cams.  I used it for jeans mending for about a year and a half, and then set up my 319 treadle that has the cams built-in and I didn’t have to swap the multi-zz (mending) and the regular zz (bar tack) cams back and forth.  I’ve used the 319 for jeans mending for the past four and a half years.

CD in Oklahoma


20131222_06.jpg 
20180613_162100.jpg 


So,  I tried my 306 as a treadle, but it was kind of a hard go.  The belt wanted to slip if I tried anything remotely thick (like denim).  If I tightened up the belt, it was pretty hard to treadle.  Maybe I need more muscle in my legs, lol?

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pickletoothbrush

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Reply with quote  #65 
I have a 306K that I wanted to install into a treadle base.  Changing the bobbin is tricky with a motor.  It's got to be trickier being on a treadle stand.  How did you handle it?

I don't have a 319W yet, but I think the bobbin is a little easier to take in and out.  My Mom taught me to sew on that model.
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sewingforsolitude

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Reply with quote  #66 
Because I have a Singer 15 treadle and know nothing about the options... my 15 treadles quite well as I expect from an 'original' treadle machine. My 201-3, obviously originally electric, is very 'heavy' treadling, and has a larger sheave diameter than the 15. Beyond swapping handwheels to change the final drive ratio, do treadle wheels (correct nomenclature?) come in different sizes? Are there more than 2 diameters for handwheel/sheave/pulley? If a person is prepared to 'mix and match' are there treadle bases that are better made/more efficient? 

Some of this is just curiousity (yup, the extra 'u' defines where I'm from) but some of it is also related to installing other, zig-zag capable, machines in treadle bases.

Thanks for insight, opinion, experience.

15:
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #67 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hilltophomesteader


So,  I tried my 306 as a treadle, but it was kind of a hard go.  The belt wanted to slip if I tried anything remotely thick (like denim).  If I tightened up the belt, it was pretty hard to treadle.  Maybe I need more muscle in my legs, lol?


I’m not sure why yours was such a hard go?  I can treadle painlessly even on the four flat-felled individual crotch seams with mine.  I have 9-spoke hand wheels on both of mine (306 & 319), so I wonder if that helps?  I only use my right foot too, so I use just “ankle action”.  I use chairs that have wheels on them, so my left foot has to stay planted on the floor to keep me from rolling away.  I don’t run a very tight belt either (see below).



Quote:
Originally Posted by pickletoothbrush
I have a 306K that I wanted to install into a treadle base.  Changing the bobbin is tricky with a motor.  It's got to be trickier being on a treadle stand.  How did you handle it?

I don't have a 319W yet, but I think the bobbin is a little easier to take in and out.  My Mom taught me to sew on that model.


Since I run a “sort of” loose belt, I can tip my machines up just enough to slide the NP (needle plate) off to the left without throwing the belt off.  I removed the belly pans/dress protectors from my treadles to give me access under the machines.  I first push the NP up with one hand (finger) from underneath and slide it as far as the spring lets it go with the other hand, then I tip the machine back just slightly with one hand, and slide the NP the rest of the way off with the other.  Then, I can see the BC (Bobbin Case) easily to remove and replace it with one or two hands from underneath.  

My treadle belt has just enough slack in it to allow the NP to slide off without marring the table top.  Oh, and the two hinges of my German treadle are just a little bit loose too, so that may help a bit.  The left end of the machine can come up a bit without raising the belt side of the machine.  I change bobbin thread color from time to time, but I usually just run white thread in the bobbin most of the time while I’m changing upper thread colors to match the denim blue that will show.  I do go through several white bobbins and have to wind new ones.  I don’t ever change thread sizes on these machines (Tex30, C&C (Coats & Clark) XP, C&C Dual Duty Plus Denim, C&C Dual Duty Plus original, and a spool of old TG&Y or some other off-brand once in a while, if it is the color that I need and passes the “pull test”).

I usually hand wheel my machine when sewing on the lump of fabric made where the four seams come together in the crotch.  That big lump can cause a lot of problems with needle deflection even when hand wheeling.  I use 206x13-11 universal-point needles.  Always, (ALWAYS!), use the smallest needle that your thread requires when sewing thick stuff, especially when mending.  The small-size needle can find its way through the layers of fabric easier than a thick needle, and with less punching effort.  I’ve broken my share of size 14 & 16 needles learning that.  An exception to that rule is when you’re doing FMQ with a hopping foot (like with a Singer 301A, either electric or HC).  Size your needle up one size when using the hopping foot or it will miss stitches.  Wife uses a size 11 for about everything except FMQ, and then she uses a size 14 with the same small Tex30 thread.  There’s something about the hopping foot that lets the thread rise up with the size 11 needle (eliminating the loop that the hook needs to form a stitch) but seldom with the size 14.

My worst needle flex moments are usually with reattaching hip pocket corners on jeans that have a rivet in the corners.  When I sew the pocket side back on, I go up and around the rivet hole and back down the other side.  Every once in a while, I fall into the rivet hole when trying to go around it, and bend or break my needle.  I just HATE IT when I fall into a rivet hole......don’t you?

CD in Oklahoma


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sewingforsolitude

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Reply with quote  #68 
Wow! I just learned a lot, thanks very much once again for detailed, informative answers.
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #69 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sewingforsolitude
... my 15 treadles quite well....My 201-3...originally electric, is very 'heavy' treadling, and has a larger sheave diameter than the 15.


Have you ever checked the weight difference between hand wheels from treadle machines and hand wheels from electric machines?  In my experience, the machines designed to be treadled have much heavier balance wheels on them.  Some of the older treadle machine wheels are extremely heavier than new plastic or potmetal disc wheels.  I don’t know how much difference it makes, but I always try to put a spoked wheel on the electric machines that I’m converting to treadle.  Maybe the extra weight helps with momentum, but mostly, I need the larger rim of the spoked wheel for my hand.  I’m not very good at starting and stopping my needle without using my hand on the hand wheel.  I also do a lot of sewing through difficult areas using a finger in the spokes to hand wheel.

I regularly read people saying that you can treadle a machine with a small disk wheel on it, and they’re correct.  But, I wonder how many of them actually have gone beyond just motivating a machine by treadle, to actually working one to sew stuff with on a regular basis?  I don’t know, but I’ve noticed that the pulley size on the spoked wheels are usually much smaller in diameter than the electric disk wheels.  I even had to install strips of oak-tanned leather on the shoulders of some of my spoked wheels to fill the gap between the shoulder and the BW tire so that I can wind bobbins (Singer 306 & 319).

CD in Oklahoma

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OurWorkbench

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Reply with quote  #70 
Thank you, CD, for confirming the use of a finer needle if possible. My sister told me about that a lot of years ago, when I was sewing with denim and corduroy. It really did help.

Janey

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redmadder

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Reply with quote  #71 
Both my daughters got their prom dresses hand sewn together at the top of the zipper cause I didn't have time to sew in the hook and eye.  I joked that their date better not show up with scissors.
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khogue

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Reply with quote  #72 
CD that needle information is most helpful. I intend to go right away and buy the remaining size 11 206x13 needles at the shop near me. 
I just assumed a bigger needle was needed for mending like that.
I pulled on a black lightweight denim skirt this morning and then remembered why I rarely wear it, there are no pockets. I shall fix that problem very soon, patch pockets are better than no pockets. 

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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #73 
Quote:
Originally Posted by khogue
....I just assumed a bigger needle was needed for mending like that....


I match my needle size to my thread size.  I wasn’t always that way, and for a long time thought that I wanted to use no smaller than a size 14 for anything including Tex27 (serger) thread.  

What really got me to thinking about using the smaller-sized needles was back in the early 2000s when my wife was breaking needles sewing embroidered patches onto our leather motorcycle vests.  Universal 14s broke or bent, so she went to Universal 16s and Jeans 16s and they bent or broke too.  All of that time, she was using small Tex30 thread.  Once she’d gone through all of her big needles, she had to use a size 12 needle to finish up, and the bending and breaking stopped.  She sewed a bunch of patches on our vests with the smaller needle, and we even overlapped many of them (that had the same theme like “I Rode Mine”) so that she was sewing through two patches plus the leather vest.  On top of that, her machine for all of them was a 1990 JC Penney 7057 Freearm (plastic gears) that supposedly won’t hold up to that kind of sewing.  As long as she used a Universal size 12 (Singer) needle and Tex30 thread (C&C Dual Duty+), things went just fine.  She still has the machine and uses it when she needs a freearm.  I admit that I did replace a broken hook gear in it in 2006, but I think that the gear failed due to age of the gear as much as anything.  It broke while she was piecing quilt blocks at quilting class one evening.

The Schmetz website has a lot of good information about needles, and you’ll even notice that they sell “Jeans” needles in sizes 10, 12, 14, 16, & 18.  So, jeans or denim sewing doesn’t require a big needle just because of the material.  If you use big thread, then you have to use a big needle.

CD in Oklahoma

20181020_111622.jpg  Machine75_01.jpg 


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khogue

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Reply with quote  #74 
CD I've never given much thought to the needle size with regards to the thread, always thinking about the fabric. I'll be looking at them differently now!

I'm sure there are many memories connected to those patches. Do you still ride? 

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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #75 
Quote:
Originally Posted by khogue
CD I've never given much thought to the needle size with regards to the thread, always thinking about the fabric. I'll be looking at them differently now!

I'm sure there are many memories connected to those patches. Do you still ride?


The various points on needles are what you need to consider as far as the fabric or material being sewn is concerned.  Don’t forget about needle point selection to match what you’re sewing, both for the benefit of the machine and for the material (and maybe your patience).

We parked our cruisers in 2014.  I rode a 750 and she rode an 800.  They were getting lots of miles and age on them (becoming less dependable) and we had slowed down using them to the point that we barely rode them even around town.  From 2001 until 2005, we rode them all over heck and gone, averaging around 13,000 miles per year.  When traveling, we had our camping gear on the two bikes and seldom stayed in motels.  We’d throw a leg over them and away we’d go, just the two of us!  On weekends when we weren’t traveling, it was nothing to ride across the state and back just for lunch on a Saturday or Sunday.  We had several friends that also rode, and all three of our kids rode.

We had a blast while we were doing it, but eventually got to the point that we’d “been there and done that” enough that it wasn’t as much fun.  We rode them to and from 15 states close around Oklahoma, and rode them in Daytona Florida when our Navy son was stationed in Jacksonville and had his Harley with him, but we hauled them to that state.  Lots of great memories, some interesting situations, and plenty of amazing places without having any major problems.  We do miss sewing those new patches on our vests.

In 2014 when the seals and hoses started leaking on the cruisers, and we were getting near the age of developing leaks of our own, we decided to park the bikes and buy a new car.  We found it was really nice to be able to talk to each other again while we traveled, instead of having to save it until the next fuel stop.  We never had intercoms on the bikes, so it was kind of like traveling alone together.  Now we can travel together again....and visit.....behind a windshield that has windshield wipers.....with an air conditioner......and heater......

CD in Oklahoma

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Jpwest

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Reply with quote  #76 
ThayerRags - I learn so much from your posts! Thanks for the needle info. Now I know why I broke so many denim needles patching. I will change my tactics.
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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #77 
This is a long read, but if you’ve ever had to fight with a zipper, it may help you.

It’s that time of year again.  In my neighborhood, it’s time for the farmers and other workers to drag that old pair of insulated overalls or coveralls out of the pickup floorboard, out from under the seat, out from behind the seat, or out of the bed toolbox, knock some of last spring’s mud off of them, and get reacquainted with them again.  It’s not really cold here yet, but it’s time to start thinking about the “warmies”.

And for some, they suddenly recall that it seems like there was some problem with them the last time they wore them when it was starting to warm up again, and they hadn’t thought a thing about them since then.  Upon not-so-close examination, it comes to them that the reason they stowed them early last spring was because the front zipper was screwed (farmer/workman talk for “broken, jammed, hung-up, non-working, piece-a-sh__, etc”).

I got my first pair this week.  The problem is, I had made a buy of a couple of industrial machines just a month ago, and of course, they were still setting in the way of using my Singer 16-41 jump-foot machine to put a new zipper in overalls and coveralls.  So, I spent a morning finding new homes for the extra machines, the boxes of parts and doo-dads that came with them, and cleaning up my sewing area.  Then I pulled the coveralls out of the bag and took a look at them.

The economy plastic coil zipper had no teeth missing or damaged, but the zipper slide had allowed one side of the zipper to move several teeth past the other side to make a jam at the bottom of the zipper closure.  Those several teeth didn’t have any teeth on the opposing side to mesh up with, and formed a little loop locking down the process.  The cause of this mystical phenomena is commonly known as a “fit”.  The zipper slide doesn’t respond properly to the physical command to slide, and manual force, sometimes extreme, is applied to encourage the zipper slide to respond appropriately.  I’ve done it myself, so I know of what I speak.  However, I had the existing zipper repaired and working in a matter of minutes, and I didn’t even have to install a new zipper.  How?  I’ll tell you.

Look closely at a zipper slide, and you’ll notice that the rear of the slide has two flat pieces extending out from the main part of the slide, and have no connection to each other.  The front of the slide is where the connection is.  The job of the two rear flat pieces is to press the opposing teeth together to join the two sides of the zipper.  The upper flat piece will have side rails to direct (force) the teeth together to lock them together.  When the two flat pieces spread out from each other, either from force, mud, fit, or age, and don’t press the opposing teeth together to set them properly, the zipper doesn’t get closed, and can even allow one side of the zipper to slide past the other.

To repair my zipper slide, I used a small flat-blade screwdriver to place between the upper flat metal and the zipper tape, and twisted slightly to spread the two flat pieces even further apart.  Don’t get too rough doing this!  Then, I manually pulled the zipper tape of the side with too many teeth through the slide past the other half of the zipper.  At this point, I slid the other slide back up the zipper to make sure that I had the proper amount of teeth relocated past the other side (coveralls have a two-way zipper with two opposing slides).  Otherwise, without a two-way zipper, a count of teeth can tell you if you’re even on both sides.  Then I carefully slid my spread-out slide down the zipper until I reached the point that the teeth were interlocked, and carefully pressed the flat pieces of the zipper slide back together.  

We have a pair of “zipper pliers” at the shop for doing this pressing, but I had to use a small pair of adjustable pliers (“water pump pliers, Channellocks”) instead.  By pressing slightly on the very rear of the slide’s two flat pieces, I bent them carefully back together again.  Then, I carefully moved the slide down onto the portion of the zipper that had the teeth locked together properly, and mashed (an Okie term for pressing, squeezing, or applying pressure) the two flat pieces together just a little bit more.  Don’t over-do the mashing.  I got mine just a tad (Okie talk for “only a small amount”) too tight, but I’m going with it as-is.  The slide moves good going down, but is a little tight zipping back up.  Part of that could be from last year’s mud remaining in the zipper coil.  I would rather have it too tight than not tight enough.  After some use, the two flat metal pieces should spread a little anyway, so barring another “fit”, the zipper should be good for many more miles of zipperness.  If not, we’ll put in a new heavy duty metal zipper to replace the cheesy coil zipper.  Use it up, wear it out, make do, or do without.

CD in Oklahoma

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khogue

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Reply with quote  #78 

CD according to Google you are about 3.5-4 hours from Tulsa. I wish I could sit quietly in the corner and watch you do some of these repairs in person. 




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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #79 
Thanks, CD. We have pressed a metal slide back together to make a zipper function, tho I never thought about tweaking the process to fix a maladjusted zipper.

Initially, I thought your mention of "fit" had to do with the owner getting the zipper up and over an increasing girth. Hmmm, do you find the maladjustment in the zipper correlates to the left or right handedness of the wearer?

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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #80 
Quote:
Originally Posted by khogue

CD according to Google you are about 3.5-4 hours from Tulsa. I wish I could sit quietly in the corner and watch you do some of these repairs in person.


Yep, we’re on opposite corners of the state, about as far apart as we can get and still both be in Oklahoma.

Unfortunately, it’s not all grins and giggles when I’m doing repairs, so it may not be as enjoyable as you’d think.  (I’ve always been in the “cussin helps” camp, and an active participant.)

CD in Oklahoma


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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #81 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WI Lori
.... Hmmm, do you find the maladjustment in the zipper correlates to the left or right handedness of the wearer?


My recollection of past “fits” that I’ve thrown with personal zippers seems to lean more toward having BOTH HANDS involved during the time that the maladjustment occurred.....

CD in Oklahoma


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khogue

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Reply with quote  #82 
I'm self taught, my Mama and Grandmas did little to no sewing as I was growing up so this would be educational for me.  (Not the cussin just the sewing.) [smile]

I have a fairly decent sewing library but have yet to find a good clothing repair book.  


Quote:
Originally Posted by ThayerRags
 

Unfortunately, it’s not all grins and giggles when I’m doing repairs, so it may not be as enjoyable as you’d think.  (I’ve always been in the “cussin helps” camp, and an active participant.)

CD in Oklahoma


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PatriciaPf

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Reply with quote  #83 
Quote:
Originally Posted by khogue
I'm self taught, my Mama and Grandmas did little to no sewing as I was growing up so this would be educational for me.  (Not the cussin just the sewing.) [smile]

I have a fairly decent sewing library but have yet to find a good clothing repair book.  


You may find this book helpful:  "Clothing Alteration Secrets Revealed!" by Judith Turner.  I find it very good.  Her website is loaded with guidelines/videos and you can subscribe for more detailed videos.  See https://geniecentre.com/ 
Judith died recently when she failed to survive a complex surgery.  I really miss her.  Her family and associates are maintaining her web business.

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khogue

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Reply with quote  #84 
Thank you for the book recommendation Patty. 


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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #85 
Quote:
Originally Posted by khogue
I'm self taught, my Mama and Grandmas did little to no sewing as I was growing up so this would be educational for me.  (Not the cussin just the sewing.)  

I have a fairly decent sewing library but have yet to find a good clothing repair book.  



I don’t know of any book on machine clothing repair.  My wife helped me get started.  She’s been sewing and mending for 5 decades.  Most sewing books are about clothing alterations or clothing construction.  Repair methods are probably as varied as the damage that clothing can sustain.  In this short thread, there are three different methods for mending denim jeans (straight stitch, multizigzag stitch, and darning stitch), so it may be difficult to write a book on the best method to use.  Basically, you just have to do what it takes to repair the damage as well as possible.  I think that’s what has kept my interest in mending jeans for the past 8 years or so.  It’s the challenge of figuring out how to repair nearly anything and everything that walks through the door.  Seldom are any two going to be the same.

On the cussin part.....I probably wouldn’t be too educational.  I rarely come up with any new cuss words, but since I worked highlines (High Voltage Electric Lines) for 28 years of my life, I had some really good teachers in the fine art of profanity, and have amassed quite a large vocabulary.  Some electric line projects probably wouldn’t have been completed if not for the %#&$%^!!# cussin’.  You ought to see some of the plans those $&*#%&@^ engineers send out sometimes!

CD in Oklahoma


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path49

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Reply with quote  #86 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatriciaPf


You may find this book helpful:  "Clothing Alteration Secrets Revealed!" by Judith Turner.  I find it very good.  Her website is loaded with guidelines/videos and you can subscribe for more detailed videos.  See https://geniecentre.com/ 
Judith died recently when she failed to survive a complex surgery.  I really miss her.  Her family and associates are maintaining her web business.


I sure hope it's a good book...it's over $1100 on ebay! And on Amazon , the price starts at $859 for a 3rd edition. Maybe other editions are less but, after seeing those prices, I quit looking.......
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khogue

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Reply with quote  #87 
I saw those same prices, yikes.  It appears to still be available at the mentioned website in book and e-book form. It's also available at Google Play for just under $40.  I'd prefer a hands on book so I'll be scouting the thrift stores for a copy. It's not available to me through the local library or any of the loaning branches unfortunately.

Quote:
Originally Posted by path49


I sure hope it's a good book...it's over $1000 on ebay! And on Amazon , the price starts at $859 for a 3rd edition. Maybe other editions are less but, after seeing those prices, I quit looking.......

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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #88 
I worked on my “Winter Quilt Project” a little today.  It’s laundry day, and the insecure refugee dog that adopted us sucked/chewed holes in both recliner seat covers (we call them dog quilts) this week and it’s my job to repair them before they go into the washer.  A pair of 2” squares sandwiched with cut-to-fit batting repaired the hole in one of them (squares sewn on either side as rag quilt squares onto a scrappy quilt), but I had to piece two 3” squares together (twice) and shape a 4” long oval piece of batting to sandwich the larger hole in the second quilt.

I used my Singer 319W1 treadle for this "quilt work", and a couple of puckers and one backlash later, I was done.  Just one short laps in concentration for a moment, and I let my treadle run the machine backwards causing the backlash.  It’s one of the hazards of sewing with a treadle.  And yes, I had a vivid image of Zorba’s avatar smile in mind as I was cutting my backlash loose.  Electric motors seldom run a machine backwards to cause a backlash, but treadles and handcranks sure can.  Here’s to you Zorba (toast).

CD in Oklahoma


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PatriciaPf

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Reply with quote  #89 
Quote:
Originally Posted by path49


I sure hope it's a good book...it's over $1100 on ebay! And on Amazon , the price starts at $859 for a 3rd edition. Maybe other editions are less but, after seeing those prices, I quit looking.......


That is ridiculous!  I didn't pay anything near that.  Mine, a 3rd edition, was under $100 including postage from Australia.  Sorry I don't remember the exact price.  You can still get it on her website, but I wouldn't delay;  there may not be a lot of copies available.  Just looked:  $39.95 + shipping.

See https://geniecentre.com/clothing-alterations-book/

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pgf

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Reply with quote  #90 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThayerRags
 He sucks holes in the quilts, so it’s my job on laundry day to repair them by putting rag quilt type patches on the holes, one on each side, with replacement cotton batting between.  All four quilts (2 in-use, 2 on deck) are slowly turning from scrappy quilts into rag quilts.


I'd been wondering how you could possibly make money doing all that incredible detail work repairing ripped jeans, without charging more than the jeans are worth, until you posted this.

Now I know you just do it all for the fun of it!

paul

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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #91 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgf


I'd been wondering how you could possibly make money doing all that incredible detail work repairing ripped jeans, without charging more than the jeans are worth, until you posted this.

Now I know you just do it all for the fun of it!

paul


Well actually, there’s more to it than you’re seeing on the surface.  And surprisingly enough, you CAN make money mending, repairing, and altering for the public, but I’m glad others can’t see it.  There’s less competition that way.  So no, it’s not all just for the fun of it, although there is some fun in some of it.

CD in Oklahoma


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ThayerRags

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Reply with quote  #92 
I’m doing jeans mending today, and I got to do something that I don’t recall ever doing before.  I got to put a patch on one of my patches.

Clothing is dropped off with my wife at the shop, and she determines who gets the task (her or me).  If it’s for me, she puts a brief note in the bag with the item telling me what mending needs done.  With jeans, if it’s a good pair, she just says to mend everything found, but on the older ones, the owner doesn’t always want everything mended (cost savings), so my wife gives me the details.

I got to a pair of very faded work jeans that included the note “Mend crotch and check hip pocket corners”.  She seldom says “check” for pocket corners.  It’s either mend them or skip them.  So, I mended a small rip in the crotch (actually the rearend) and checked the hip pocket corners.  I had replaced a good amount of denim at one of the hip pockets when it had gotten torn badly a while back, and low and behold, there was now a hole worn in my repair fabric.

Matching faded repair denim color with the jeans color makes the repair not look so obvious as new denim would, but my faded denim repair fabric is from used jeans.  I have always figured that the worn/faded repair fabric should last as long as the jeans that it’s put into.  I doubt that this hole got worn in it just since I put it in the jeans, so there must have been a thin spot in my repair fabric that I didn’t see.

Anyway, I’ve now put a patch on a patch, (and I did this one just for fun).

CD in Oklahoma

20181107_135155.jpg  20181107_135146.jpg 


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sewingforsolitude

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Reply with quote  #93 
CD, I always, always, learn something from your 'repair' posts. Thanks.
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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #94 
i had a 60% off coupon for joann and wanted to use it to get a darning egg. i looked on the website and it said my store had them in stock, but i couldn't find them in the store. i asked the lady who cut my fabric (which happens to be for a repair you'll see soon) where the darning eggs were and she said "what's that?"
the other lady at the counter knew what they were but said she hadn't seen them recently. the coupon also works online so i did a store pickup order, so i guess someone is gonna find where they're hidden there
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Phyllis1115

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Reply with quote  #95 
My mom enjoyed mending and was good at doing it. She always cleared my mending basket when she visited.
I miss her each time I mend and she's been gone for more than forty years.

Smokeythecat-
Your silver gray cat resembles my 16.5 year old Valentina. She found me when she was only 5 weeks old and immediately fell in love with my older male cat, Wolfgang. He shared his food, responded to her play and managed daycare while I was at work.

-Phyllis
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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #96 
Tadaa
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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #97 
I had to remove and replace a piece of the thing i’m repairing. I sewed the new one on (with the serger), it was inside out. I took it off and sewed it on the right way, but i messed up the measurements. So now i have to take it off again :/
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smokeythecat

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Reply with quote  #98 
Dritz darning eggs have a finish that Smokey thinks is tasty. He keeps licking it and now he’s laying down kicking it. I had some wood knitting needles that tasted good once so i wanna lick the egg to see but i can’t because he’s licked all over it
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Mavis

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Reply with quote  #99 
I look at these great repair photos.  I get inspired.   I remember some of the clothing construction lessons from home ec class.  I foolishly volunteer to rescue my daughter's beautiful winter coat and offer to replace the zipper.  
What was I thinking?  I'm a quilter, not a clothing mender.  Trying to carefully deconstruct this coat to remove old zipper and get it looking like new again .... oh, I can see how this could end very badly.
Load of stress off my shoulders as I made the decision to throw in the towel and take it to a local sewing store that does mending and alterations!
Now back to my quilting.

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WI Lori

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Reply with quote  #100 
Someone once recommended sewing the new zipper to the old zipper. I assume the old teeth were cut off the zipper tape.
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