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rainworx

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I just purchased a Singer 306K and I love the quality of this machine plus it's engineering and design! The upper body has some crazing and the shellac is mostly crackled and spotty on the neck & plate including what appears to be dried dust and oil coating all the parts on the underside but other than cosmetic appearance this machine is a beast - good for another few generations at least! I have a few questions and concerns about the cleaning and finishing of the shellac, etc.

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https://www.mediafire.com/folder/gmct4o4ub39ts/Singer_306K

First question, I would like to know if it would be better (easier) to take the machine apart to clean it thoroughly. I am very mechanically inclined and have been repairing just about anything since I was two feet tall. Or would this have an adverse affect once re-assembled whereby I would have to have the machine completely re-timed & re-tuned?

As for the shellac after cleaning the machine (soap & water) and then using the denatured alcohol (leaving the decals) is it safe to then use wet sanding with mineral oil to remove or level out the crazing and uneven ridges (is that even possible) and then do the shellac with drops of linseed oil? Or does rubbing with the denatured alcohol actually do this?

Thank you for any help you can offer...

600x800.jpg

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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #2 
Sanding will not help, you will find the crazing is to deep. Take all the shiny metal bits off that is in the way. Now take a rag wrap around you finger dip into the alcohol place a drop or two of linseed oil on the rag a rub lightly in a circular motion. Continue this until you are satisfied with the look. The final step is french polish with shellac and linseed oil. Be careful and practice this tech before you go to the machine so you can become familiar with this leveling process. Really no need to take the machine apart. If you wet sand the crazing out you will end up with a big mess and may do more harm than good. This is a slow process that works well so take your time. These machines are showing their age so sometimes we make them as pretty as we can. Don't expect a brand new looking machine. Just have fun with it. This machine is not that bad. Why not touch up the chipped spot and just polish the machine. 
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Miriam

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Reply with quote  #3 
I think I would just use TR3...
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks for the advise Skipper. Now how do I get the upper mechanics deep inside the head clean without removing the parts?  What would be the best way to clean and lube this area?

inner.head.jpg 


Hi Miriam
What is TR3?

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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #5 
This TR3?  Is is compatible with Shellac?

tr3.jpg   


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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #6 
TR3 is compatible with shellac. It may save a lot of time. Miriam can give more advice on how to clean electric machines and how to get to the parts for oiling and cleaning.
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #7 
lol...I'm not after saving time and taking short cuts my friend. I thought i was talking to the same guy from the other forum. My mistake.
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Cari-in-Oly

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Reply with quote  #8 
I can vouch for the TR3, I use it on all my machines. It's effects are the most noticeable on the black machines. It does take time, and lots and lots of cotton balls. Just follow the instructions on the can, changing cotton balls often, and don't let it dry until it's coming off clean. Then a final buffing with a clean soft cloth and it makes the machine shiny shiny.

Cari

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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #9 
Then I am the right person. My way takes lots of time and works great. Then leave the TR3 alone and follow my tech for refurbishing the shellac clear coat on the old machines on the QB. Now for the inside of the machine. Remove all the outside casing you can. I use Plast Buster with the red tube that comes with it. Spray a little into all the oil spots and underneath on all the moving parts. Anywhere you see metal to metal moving points. Turn the machine upside down get all the moving parts. Stay way from the electrical and decals. Let this sit for a couple of days. Then flush all this with sewing machine oil. I place the machine in a cookie sheet to catch the drippings. If it gets on the finish wipe it off with a soft cloth. If the machine is not frozen up and moving freely you should only have to do this once. Do this before you start the clean up and polishing the machine finish. After you apply the sewing machine oil run the machine for a minute or two to get the oil worked in to the moving parts. I use a tooth brush or small brass brush to clean the linkage and metal parts if needed. How is the wiring on the machine? Now is the time to replace if needed. I have spent several weeks using this method but it is worth the time.  After all the clean up is done wipe the machine down with naphtha to remove any oils for working on the clear coat.
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #10 
Well Miriam, it never occurred to me to check who had "a dangly center piece" and who did not but, do you think it would help? I respect anybody's advise good, bad or indifferent and I certainly don't check for dangly bits first and ask questions later. I also pay attention to everything and everyone. We all have something to contribute.

Having said that, I am a bit of an artisan myself so when I bump into something new, I watch, listen and try to learn as much as I can from the people that have greater experience than myself so that I can do a proper job. Hopefully, in the end, I don't screw it up and it looks nice.

I am very good with my hands and I've been working as a fine finishing carpenter most of my life so I'm familiar with details and French polishing (on wood furniture!). I want the best finish that I can get without stripping the machine to bare metal and refinishing so, I believe that Skippers' application is the correct path for the finish that I'm looking for. No offense intended. And I'd still like to see the before and after pictures of both French polish and TR3 after you get Win10 installed.

I'm glad you all think my machine looks pretty good to start with...that's a bit of a relief in itself.

Thank you Cari-in-Oly for backing up the TR3 but I believe I'll taking the long road.

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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipper
Then I am the right person. My way takes lots of time and works great. Then leave the TR3 alone and follow my tech for refurbishing the shellac clear coat on the old machines on the QB. Now for the inside of the machine. Remove all the outside casing you can. I use Plast Buster with the red tube that comes with it. Spray a little into all the oil spots and underneath on all the moving parts. Anywhere you see metal to metal moving points. Turn the machine upside down get all the moving parts. Stay way from the electrical and decals. Let this sit for a couple of days. Then flush all this with sewing machine oil. I place the machine in a cookie sheet to catch the drippings. If it gets on the finish wipe it off with a soft cloth. If the machine is not frozen up and moving freely you should only have to do this once. Do this before you start the clean up and polishing the machine finish. After you apply the sewing machine oil run the machine for a minute or two to get the oil worked in to the moving parts. I use a tooth brush or small brass brush to clean the linkage and metal parts if needed. How is the wiring on the machine? Now is the time to replace if needed. I have spent several weeks using this method but it is worth the time.  After all the clean up is done wipe the machine down with naphtha to remove any oils for working on the clear coat.


I'm willing to put in the time for this machine because one day I'll be passing this down to family and I want it to be in the best possible condition. I have your list of supplies which I'm picking up this week.

Questions:
- Will the Plast Buster damage shellac or the decals if it comes in contact?

- I like the cookie sheet idea and sounds like I'll need a lot of sewing oil? how much are we talking
  about to flush out the PB?

- Will I need any type of grease for gears or bushings, etc. or just machine oil?

- After clean up is there any effect that the Naptha might have on the shellac that I should know of?

The electrical needs replacing for sure. I will do that after the cleaning cycle. I'm looking forward to getting this project going and I will post as I go. I'm sure that I'll have more questions. Thank you for your help.


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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #12 
Thank you all for your help and advise, it is greatly appreciated.
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thought I would show you all a pic of my 128.  She's a real pretty machine and the finish is very nice. Just a few nicks here and there.

I know I can't get my 306K to this condition but close would be nice. Sews like it was new.

650x488.jpg   



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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #14 
You will need a 4oz bottle of sewing machine oil. The Plast Buster will do no harm if you clean it off as soon as it gets on the finish. The naphtha will make the surface appear white(cloudy) but will go away with the polishing process. No need to worry about the naptha. petroleum jelly is recommended for gear lube not oil.  I like your 128 very nice. I need to post my60+ pictures of my machines here soon.
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Margaret

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Reply with quote  #15 
Dave, your 128 is a lovely machine! Will be interested to see the before and after pics of the 306.
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thanks Skipper I will will be careful when I get to that stage and will pick up some petroleum jelly.

I would love to see your collection of machines...I can imagine they look pretty good!
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #17 
Thanks Margaret...and I will be posting progress pics as I go. I work long hours so this is going to take awhile [smile]

I plan on making this a fun thing and I think the time will be well spent.
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Skipper

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Reply with quote  #18 
Remember Dave the Plast Buster just a little will do. Don't over do the PB.
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #19 
I will be very careful. I tested a little area with naptha and, yes, I see how careful I must be with the finish [smile]. I'm sure that the PB will be the same. I imagined turning the machine upside down and a puddle of PB comes flowing out all over my decals, etc. - so i will be sure to go sparingly. Thanks Skipper
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SteveH-VSS

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Reply with quote  #20 
It can be done, but it is hard to overdo it with a q-tip type application
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rainworx

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Reply with quote  #21 
So true....thanks SteveH-VSS.
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